Gamification and education

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In games we are always chasing our better selves. We are natural learners. But to unfold this skill we need to consider a few conditions. This is about Gamification in education.

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Gamification and education

  1. 1. Why (and how) Gamificationcontributes to education. Roman Rackwitz roman@engaginglab.com engaginglab.com romanrackwitz.de @RomanRackwitz /rrackwitz "In games we are chasing our better selves." - Roman Rackwitz From the series of Gamification & education: The horizontal approach.
  2. 2. GAMIFICATION & EDUCATION: In games we are always chasing our better selves. The human desire to be involved & engaged in a game-like situation is what made us to succeed all the challenges that we faced since the beginning of human kind. We are natural learners. But to unfold this skill we need to consider a few conditions.
  3. 3. Gamers voluntarily invest countless hours in developing their problem-solving skills within the context of games. - J A M E S P A U L G E E , 2 0 0 8 They [the gamers] recognize the value of extended practice, and develop personal qualities such as persistence, creativity, and resilience through extended play, - J A N E M C G O N I G A L , 2 0 1 1
  4. 4. Replace 'gamers' with 'students' and it becomes obvious why games could be a great partner for our educational systems.
  5. 5. THE BIG QUESTION IS: "HOW DO WE EDUCATE OUR CHILDREN TO TAKE THEIR PLACE IN OUR GLOBAL SOCIETY, GIVEN THE FACT THAT WE DON'T KNOW WHAT THE FUTURE AND ITS ECONOMIES, CULTURAL IDENTITIES, AND GLOBAL CHALLENGES WILL LOOK LIKE AT THE END OF NEXT YEAR?" ROMAN RACKWITZ ENGAGEMENT DESIGNER FOUNDER & CEO ENGAGINGLAB GMBH & RACKSOCIAL WWW.ROMANRACKWITZ.DE
  6. 6. HOW? W H A T S C H O O L C A N L E A R N F R O M G A M E S !
  7. 7. Agent Principle In good learning the learner must know, that what he learns matters. A person's time and 'brain-resources' are scarce. So, it is necessary to make it obvious to the student, that by participating in this particular topic, he won't wasted his time. Games make you an agent by letting you co-design the game while playing it. The player's actions and his decisions affect the game. There are choices, decisions & actions to take and so, the gamer is co-designing the actual performance of the game. ("No, just to earn good grades, or to avoid bad ones, is not meaningful enough!")
  8. 8. Customization Every student is different the same way every gamer has a different set of skills and experiences. Good learning environments need to find a way to customize difficulty individually thus allowing you to solve problems in manifold ways. "In games we are always chasing our better selves. This is why we need to provide an individual 'Path to Mastery'." - Roman Rackwitz
  9. 9. Identity "The beginning of learning is to know: Who am I gonna be?" - James Paul Gee. Games are great in creating an identity: Why the gamer is acting and who he is going to be. Learning has the same potential of being an invitation to become a new kind of person with his own set of skills, goals and possibilities.
  10. 10. Problem Solving The difference between games and school is that the former is more about problem solving, the latter more about learning facts. - Roman Rackwitz We know that problem based learning is already well-known but there is still a long way to go when it comes to its implementation. Teachers often don't have the time to wait for individual solutions. "There is just enough time for the geek to get it."
  11. 11. Sequencing problems In games sequencing problems is level design. "Early problems set the player up for later success." - James Paul Gee The human mind works best by breaking down problems in order to solve them. This way people go from step by step solutions to solving the overall complex problem. Therein lies the vast potential of using problem sequencing in school.
  12. 12. Pleasantly frustrating It is interesting that we love to face challenges and even to fail by trying to overcome them, when we think about activities that we are doing voluntarily. E.g.: Why is that? Because this is what our brain is designed for: to learn! By failing within a particular environment (see the slides: we experience it rather as progress than failure. Without failing first, there is almost no way to experience the pleasure of finally 'getting it'. Games, Sports, Hobbies The 5 Pillars of Gamification) keep the challenge at a 'cutting edge.'
  13. 13. HOW TO GET STARTED? A F I R S T S T E P
  14. 14. Math Biology Arts Geology Phsyic Math Biology Arts Geology Phsyic discipline-mentality Story driven Divergent Thinking Let's start by changing the perspective from rather thinking about education as a knowledge delivery system of separated disciplines and head over to look at learning as a process of progress within a given story or question. Stories create a context that trigger curiosity, set the stage of why to deal with content and make it easier to relate to the given situation individually. Story A Story B Story C sw itch 90°
  15. 15. WWW.SIRKENROBINSON.COM WHAT IS DIVERGENT THINKING?
  16. 16. Math Biology Arts Geology Phsyic Divergent Thinking-mentality Story A Story B Story C Diversity Mastery School designed with a divergent thinking approach means to begin the school year rather by looking at a complex challenge than just following through a timetable made up by separate disciplines. The goal is to solve this challenge, provided by the story. To be able to do so, students need to use all different disciplines together and so, to think divergently and more problem solving orientated.
  17. 17. Divergent Thinking-mentality creates a meaning to deal with the school material, given by the story --> meaning of school it lets students chose, to a particular degree, how to 'finish the story'. They learn that there are often numerous solution for one problem. They choose their own 'role' within the story --> Agent Principle the dependency of expertise in different disciplines enhances the need to collaborate. Great learning happens with others --> relatedness The horizontal journey of the students...
  18. 18. Journey through a story From the point of view of a student. Story A Story B Physic G eography History Level B Level A Level C This is how most of the most engaging experiences - like playing games, performing sports or just following your hobby - are designed from the users perspective. By knowing where to start, and to see the different possibilities of progress within a given context, it creates some kind of ownership of whatever is going to come.
  19. 19. OUR BRAIN IS A PURE LEARNING ENGINE. IT IS ALWAYS LOOKING FOR BROKEN PATTERNS AND HOW TO FIX THEM. THIS IS THE REASON WHY WE LOVE TO EXPERIENCE THE FAMOUS 'AHA-MOMENT'. BUT IT IS IMPORTANT TO US THAT THE ACTUAL LEARNING IS ALSO MEANINGFUL. SO, WE PREFER TO KNOW A STORY AROUND THE TOPICS WE NEED TO LEARN INSTEAD OF JUST BEING TOLD FACTS TO BE MEMORIZED. IF WE NEED TO MASTER OUR OWN JOURNEY WITHIN THAT STORY, THERE IS A REAL CHANCE TO GET HOOKED ON IT. ROMAN RACKWITZ | @ROMANRACKWITZ | FACEBOOK.COM/RRACKWITZ

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