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Compassionate Cities

  1. 1. Compassionate Cities ( Charter of Compassion) Compassionate Cities: An Antidote For Urban Loneliness / Isolation
  2. 2. Compassionate Cities Karen Armstrong, Charter for Compassion
  3. 3. Compassionate Cities: An Antidote For Urban Loneliness / Isolation
  4. 4. What Is Compassion? • Compassion literally means “to suffer together.” Among emotion researchers, it is defined as the feeling that arises when you are confronted with another’s suffering and feel motivated to relieve that suffering. • Compassion is not the same as empathy or altruism, though the concepts are related. • While empathy refers more generally to our ability to take the perspective of and feel the emotions of another person, compassion is when those feelings and thoughts include the desire to help. Altruism, in turn, is the kind, selfless behavior often prompted by feelings of compassion, though one can feel compassion without acting on it, and altruism isn’t always motivated by compassion.
  5. 5. Compassion
  6. 6. Empathy
  7. 7. Altruism
  8. 8. Compassion literally means “to suffer together.”
  9. 9. Compassion • Compassion motivates people to go out of their way to help the physical, mental, or emotional pains of another and themselves. • Compassion is often regarded as having sensitivity, which is an emotional aspect to suffering. • Though, when based on cerebral notions such as fairness, justice, and interdependence.
  10. 10. Compassion
  11. 11. Compassion • Compassion involves allowing ourselves to be moved by suffering and experiencing the motivation to help alleviate and prevent it. • An act of compassion is defined by its helpfulness. • Qualities of compassion are patience and wisdom; kindness and perseverance; warmth and resolve.
  12. 12. Qualities of compassion are patience and wisdom; kindness and perseverance; warmth and resolve
  13. 13. Qualities of compassion are patience and wisdom; kindness and perseverance; warmth and resolve
  14. 14. Qualities of compassion are patience and wisdom; kindness and perseverance; warmth and resolve
  15. 15. Qualities of compassion are patience and wisdom; kindness and perseverance; warmth and resolve
  16. 16. Urban Loneliness/ Urban Isolation • It’s hard to believe someone could feel lonely surrounded by millions of people in an urban metropolis. • But the truth is, loneliness affects residents of all ages in major cities.
  17. 17. Urban Loneliness
  18. 18. Urban Loneliness
  19. 19. Urban Loneliness/ Urban Isolation • Although there’s no single source of the feeling, there are plenty of reasons why urbanites report that they’re not as sociable as those living in sparsely populated locations. • Almost as abundant are ways urban planners can make things less lonely for people in the future.
  20. 20. Urban Loneliness/ Urban Isolation
  21. 21. Why People Move to Cities • A 2016 report stated that two billion people would move to cities within the next 20 years. • Mass migration is nothing new cities have become the epicenter of opportunity. • Whether new residents seek work, education, healthcare, or social mobility, a metropolitan area is where they’re most likely to find it. • Despite all of the opportunities that come with living in these major cities, there are some drawbacks.
  22. 22. Mass migration is nothing new cities have become the epicenter of opportunity
  23. 23. Why People Move to Cities • The problem is that a move to a big city means newcomers have to leave their social circles behind. • Whether they're a few miles or several hours away from their family and childhood friends, life in the city can be a separation that makes these relationships feel the distance. • Plus, without the built-in sociability that comes with school or a career, it might be hard to meet people at first.
  24. 24. Why People Move to Cities
  25. 25. How Living Alone Affects People • Another facet of city life that affects both young and old residents is the fact that so many urbanites live alone • Not everyone who lives alone is lonely, of course. Research shows that the quality of social interactions makes people feel more fulfilled, as opposed to the quantity. • So, even if someone spends most of their time in their studio apartment, they won’t feel a sense of loneliness if they grab dinner once a week with their best friend. • Without that interaction, though, they might feel more isolated.
  26. 26. How Living Alone Affects People • Perhaps unsurprisingly, the age group most susceptible to this kind of loneliness is the elderly. • That’s because as people age, social circles shrink. Think about it as retirees, seniors no longer have daily interactions with colleagues. • They might watch as friends, family, and even spouses pass away. • This type of loneliness can affect their health, too, so planning social gatherings with elderly family members who live alone can be beneficial to both of you.
  27. 27. How Living Alone Affects People
  28. 28. How Urban Planners Can Help • It may seem as though the answer’s simple: make urban spaces more conducive to long-term living so people can live their entire lives in these communities. • This type of a transformation will take years to complete, especially since the cost of living and real estate prices remain high in places like Metro City. • In the interim, urban planners can use their position to encourage more social interaction among city dwellers who will fill the square miles they so carefully design. One great place to start is with green spaces.
  29. 29. Make Urban Spaces More Conducive To Long-term Living
  30. 30. How Urban Planners Can Help • here are already numerous health benefits that come with time spent outdoors, but an urban green area can be more than just a breath of fresh air. • It can be a meeting place for those who live in the neighborhood, whether they’re first-time friends or have a long history together. • Urban planners can also bring the conveniences of these extra-large cities to smaller metropolises so that people have all the same opportunities and benefits of city living without leaving their home bases.
  31. 31. How Urban Planners Can Help
  32. 32. How Urban Planners Can Help • Adding public transport, bicycle lanes, and making public facilities more accessible by walking will give smaller cities that same convenient feel. • As a planner, you might feel as though you’ve provided all the tools to city residents so they can lead happy, social lives with their neighbors and friends. But sometimes, the most crowded places on Earth can be the loneliest. • Keep this in mind as you work. There’s plenty more that can be done to combat urban loneliness, and you could be the one to make a change with a few thoughtful planning choices.
  33. 33. How Urban Planners Can Help
  34. 34. Compassionate City • “A compassionate city is an uncomfortable city! A city that is uncomfortable when anyone is homeless or hungry. • Uncomfortable if every child isn’t loved and given rich opportunities to grow and thrive. • Uncomfortable when as a community we don’t treat our neighbors as we would wish to be treated.” • --Karen Armstrong, Founder of the global movement, The Charter for Compassion
  35. 35. “A compassionate city is an uncomfortable city! A city that is uncomfortable when anyone is homeless or hungry.
  36. 36. Compassionate City
  37. 37. Compassionate City • Human beings are social animals. • We live and work and socialize together in communities that exist in diverse cultures and climates throughout the Earth. • Within each of these communities from Mongolia to Mogadishu to Managua to Minnesota, human beings experience compassion for others, relieving pain and suffering for their families, for their neighbors, for their communities.
  38. 38. Compassionate City
  39. 39. Compassionate City • But the structure of modern society of nation states and mega cities and a world population that has grown to over seven billion often thwarts and distorts this natural desire to be compassionate. • The sense of disconnection is so pervasive that unkindness, indifference, and selfishness appear as the norm; compassion, kindness and caring are the outliers.
  40. 40. Compassionate City
  41. 41. Compassionate City • In a Compassionate Community, the needs of all the inhabitants of that community are recognized and met, the well-being of the entire community is a priority, and all people and living things are treated with respect.
  42. 42. Compassionate City
  43. 43. Compassionate City • More simply, in a Compassionate Community, people are motivated by compassion to take responsibility for and care for each other.
  44. 44. Compassionate City • A community where compassion is fully alive is a thriving, resilient community whose members are moved by empathy to take compassionate action, are able to confront crises with innovative solutions, are confident in navigating changes in the economy and the environment, and are resilient enough to bounce back readily from natural and man-made disasters.
  45. 45. Compassionate City
  46. 46. Compassionate City • No single community in the world is a Compassionate Community in any abstract or formal sense, just as no community is devoid of compassion. • Each community will find its own path to establishing compassion as a driving and motivating force, and each will conduct its own evaluation of what is “uncomfortable” in that community’s unique culture that is, those issues that cause pain and suffering to members of the community.
  47. 47. Compassionate City
  48. 48. Compassionate City • For one community that discomfort may be youth violence or an epidemic of teen suicide. • Another community may discover that a portion of their community—perhaps immigrants, the homeless, or an LGBTQ group--has been marginalized, harassed, or even physically threatened.
  49. 49. Compassionate City
  50. 50. Charter for Compassion • The Charter for Compassion is a document that urges the peoples and religions of the world to embrace the core value of compassion. • The charter currently is available in more than 30 languages and has been endorsed by more than two million individuals around the globe
  51. 51. Charter for Compassion
  52. 52. Charter for Compassion • Charter for Compassion International, the Charter's supporting organization, has enrolled 311 communities in 45 countries in its Compassionate Communities campaign and has partnered with more than 1,300 organizations to spread the Charter's message of compassion in 10 sectors: the arts, business, education, environment, healthcare, peace, religion/spirituality/interfaith, science & research, social sciences and restorative justice
  53. 53. Charter for Compassion
  54. 54. History • On February 28, 2008, scholar and author Karen Armstrong won the TED Prize. • In her acceptance speech she called for help in creating, launching and propagating a Charter for Compassion, based on the fundamental principle of the Golden Rule
  55. 55. Scholar and author Karen Armstrong
  56. 56. Golden Rule • The Golden Rule is the principle of treating others as you want to be treated. It is a maxim that is found in most religions and cultures. It can be considered an ethic of reciprocity in some religions, although different religions treat it differently.
  57. 57. Golden Rule
  58. 58. Golden Rule • The maxim may appear as a positive or negative injunction governing conduct: • Treat others as you would like others to treat you (positive or directive form) • Do not treat others in ways that you would not like to be treated (negative or prohibitive form) • What you wish upon others, you wish upon yourself (empathetic or responsive form)
  59. 59. Golden Rule
  60. 60. The Council of Conscience • The Council of Conscience, a multi-faith, multi-national group of religious thinkers and leaders, then met in Vevey, Switzerland, to craft the final Charter for Compassion. • The Councilors sorted and reviewed the thousands of written submissions, considered the meaning of compassion, determined key ideas to include in the Charter and created a plan for how the Charter will live in the world
  61. 61. The Council of Conscience, a multi-faith, multi-national group of religious thinkers and leaders
  62. 62. The Council of Conscience • The Charter for Compassion was unveiled by Karen Armstrong and the Council of Conscience on November 12, 2009, at the TutuNational Press Club in Washington, DC. • That day, more than 75 launch events took place around the globe and more than 60 Charter for Compassion plaques designed by Yves Behar were hung at significant religious and secular sites around the world. • At its launch, the Charter was endorsed by the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond among many others
  63. 63. The Charter for Compassion
  64. 64. Charter for Compassion -- The Organization • Just a few months after Armstrong was awarded the TED Prize, a partnership of individuals and organizations around the world began coalescing to bring the Charter for Compassion to life. On May 4, 2009, the Compassionate Action Network (CAN) was launched in Seattle. • CAN's intention, expressed in its founding document, was to create "an association of like-minded programs, projects and organizations that collectively represent the power of thousands of relationships."
  65. 65. Compassionate Action Network (CAN)
  66. 66. Charter for Compassion -- The Organization • CAN became the home for the Charter for Compassion from the summer of 2012 through December 2013 and provided a wealth of startup assistance to the Charter organization, including staff, fundraising, resource development, and strategic planning. • With the support of CAN, the Fetzer Institute and many other groups and individuals committed to the Charter's ideals, the Charter for Compassion grew steadily in scale and scope. In January, 2014, almost six years after the TED Prize award, a group of leaders in the movement organized as the Global Compassion Council and formed the Charter for Compassion (CFC) as a non-profit(c)(3) organization. The Global Compassion Council became CCI's advisory panel
  67. 67. Compassionate Action Network (CAN)
  68. 68. Charter For Compassion Mission • Its mission is to support the emergence of a global movement that brings the Charter for Compassion to life. • It does this by being a network of networks— connecting organizers and leaders from around the world; providing educational resources, organizing tools and avenues for communication; sharing lessons, stories and inspiration; and providing an umbrella for Charter for Compassion conferences, events, collaborations, conversations and initiatives to create compassionate communities and institutions around the globe.
  69. 69. Charter For Compassion Mission
  70. 70. Compassionate City • Although the early work of the Charter was focused on building a network of cities, it soon became evident that communities both larger and smaller than cities wanted to join the global movement in which compassion is at the heart of a community’s activities. • The Charter’s growing network of Compassionate Communities now includes cities, towns, townships, shires, hamlets, villages, neighborhoods, islands, states, provinces, counties, republics, and countries.
  71. 71. Compassionate City
  72. 72. Compassionate City • The Charter’s Compassionate Communities program is not a certificate program that offers a seal of approval, nor does it subscribe to a single definition of a Compassionate Community. • Instead, the Charter invites communities of all sizes to bring compassion to life in practical, specific ways through compassion-driven actions in neighborhoods, businesses, schools and colleges, healthcare, the arts, local government, peace groups, environmental advocacy groups, and faith congregations.
  73. 73. Compassionate City
  74. 74. What Are the Steps for Creating a Compassionate Community? • Any individual, group, or organization that recognizes the need for greater compassion in a community is encouraged to begin the process for creating a Compassionate Community. • While the Charter does not prescribe any one path, it does recommend that the process be designed and carried out by a diverse and inclusive coalition of people so that all voices within the community are heard, and the significant issues are addressed.
  75. 75. What Are the Steps for Creating a Compassionate Community?
  76. 76. What Are the Steps for Creating a Compassionate Community? • The cities and communities that sign on to become Compassionate Cities and Communities have often begun their work by identifying the issues that are troubling the community and need to be addressed through compassionate action. • For example, a community may discover a significant issue related to social justice-- for women, for immigrants, or for some other marginalized group. • Other communities may want to address issues of drug use, gang violence, the lack of equitable healthcare, or the effects of environmental racism. • Others may decide to work to provide empowerment to youth or to educate their communities about the need for compassion in addressing environmental issues.
  77. 77. What Are the Steps for Creating a Compassionate Community?
  78. 78. Steps to Take • Any individual, group, or organization that recognizes the need for greater compassion in a community is encouraged to begin the process for creating a Compassionate Community. • While the Charter does not prescribe any one path, it does recommend that the process be designed and carried out by a diverse and inclusive coalition of people so that all voices within the community are heard, and the significant issues are addressed.
  79. 79. Any individual, group, or organization that recognizes the need for greater compassion in a community is encouraged to begin the process for creating a Compassionate Community.
  80. 80. Steps to Take • The cities and communities that sign on to become Compassionate Cities and Communities have often begun their work by identifying the issues that are troubling the community and need to be addressed through compassionate action.
  81. 81. Compassionate Cities and Communities have often begun their work by identifying the issues that are troubling the community
  82. 82. Steps to Take • For example, a community may discover a significant issue related to social justice-- for women, for immigrants, or for some other marginalized group. • Other communities may want to address issues of drug use, gang violence, the lack of equitable healthcare, or the effects of environmental racism. Others may decide to work to provide empowerment to youth or to educate their communities about the need for compassion in addressing environmental issues.
  83. 83. Community May Discover A Significant Issue Related To Social Justice
  84. 84. checklist of 10 suggested steps • This checklist of 10 suggested steps was developed for those who want to organize a Compassionate City or Community, but it may also be useful to any group organizing for social change and development.
  85. 85. Steps 1 • Bring together a group of people who are open to identifying “discomforts” in your community.
  86. 86. Steps 2 • Discover already-existing programs that are dealing with local programs and celebrate their successes.
  87. 87. Steps 3 • Invite people to join you in assessing your community.
  88. 88. Steps 4 • Analyze challenges and opportunities, choose an initial focus.
  89. 89. Steps 5 • Create short and long-term objectives and action plans.
  90. 90. Steps 6 • Share ideas and plans with local government and work for a public resolution and affirmation of the Charter for Compassion.
  91. 91. Steps 7 • Launch a kickoff event to widely publicize your plans and begin implementation of action plans around focus area(s).
  92. 92. Steps 8 • Monitor and measure your progress, and continue planning.
  93. 93. Steps 9 • Communicate within the community on a regular basis and reach out to share globally
  94. 94. Steps 10 • Compare your goals and actions against the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
  95. 95. Compassionate Communities • At the heart of the Charter for Compassion's work is its Campaign for Compassionate Communities. • In the beginning, this effort was focused on building a network of cities, but it soon became evident that communities both larger and smaller than cities wanted to join the movement to embrace compassion as a core value.
  96. 96. Compassionate Communities
  97. 97. Compassionate Communities • The Charter's growing network of Compassionate Communities encompasses nearly 50 countries and includes cities, towns, townships, shires, hamlets, villages, neighborhoods, islands, states, provinces, and counties. • Of these, more than 76 cities globally have affirmed the Charter for Compassion through city, community councils or other government entities. • Affirming the Charter means that a community has identified issues on which they are working, and have committed to a multi-year action plan.
  98. 98. List of these Compassionate Cities
  99. 99. Louisville, KY—Model City • Louisville, KY, is a shining example of a Compassionate Community, having been named the ICC’s Model City of the year for four consecutive years (2012–2015). • Louisville was the seventh city to sign on to the Compassion Charter, and Mayor Greg Fischer created Compassionate Louisville to help develop and implement a city-wide campaign to nurture and champion the growth of compassion. • In 2015, the city broke its own world record, with more than 166,000 volunteers and acts of compassion
  100. 100. Louisville, KY—Model City
  101. 101. Louisville, KY—Model City • Compassionate Louisville’s education team launched the Compassion Bench project, which is designed to provide safe spots in the community where children are encouraged to express compassion.
  102. 102. Compassion Bench project, which is designed to provide safe spots in the community where children are encouraged to express compassion.
  103. 103. Louisville, KY—Model City • The first was installed at the Louisville Islamic Center on the heels of an act of vandalism there that ultimately served only to unify the community.
  104. 104. Louisville, KY—Model City • Mayor Fischer noted that the vandalism at the mosque illustrates the heart of compassion in Louisville. • Within hours of the terrible act, dozens of community and religious leaders showed up at an 8 a.m. press conference to denounce the hate and make plans for a community cleanup the next day. • That cleanup drew a crowd of nearly 1,000 people—men, women and children; people of all color, nationality, religion and political leanings. “If the vandals’ goal was to highlight division, they failed miserably,” said Mayor Fischer. “This is a city that rejects hate, and the response to the incident at the mosque was a beautiful illustration of the work we’ve done to become a community of even greater compassion.”
  105. 105. Mayor Fischer noted that the vandalism at the mosque illustrates the heart of compassion in Louisville.
  106. 106. Within hours of the terrible act, dozens of community and religious leaders showed up at an 8 a.m. press conference to denounce the hate and make plans for a community cleanup the next day
  107. 107. Louisville, KY—Model City • Other examples of the city’s commitment to compassion in 2015 include: • The community’s Give Local Louisville effort brought in almost $3 million for local charities in one day. • Members of Compassionate Louisville’s Coordinating Circle have mentored more than 40 other communities interested in joining the Compassionate Cities movement, including surrounding counties like Henderson, Ky., as well as large cities like Detroit. • In April, Mayor Fischer announced that Louisville and Jefferson County Public Schools will serve as the site of an independently funded, $11 million health and wellness project focused on teaching caring for oneself and others.
  108. 108. Louisville, KY—Model City
  109. 109. Louisville, KY—Model City • Louisville supported and competed in the “Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest!” in September, joining cities across the nation in vying to post the greatest number of good deeds in an 11-day stretch in September. • Nearly 100 local organizations and businesses have made a commitment to compassion this year, including the international YUM! Brands and Brown-Forman.
  110. 110. “Compassion Games: Survival of the Kindest!”
  111. 111. Louisville, KY—Model City • Metro Louisville has lined up almost 100 volunteer mentors to work one-on-one with at-risk youth in a program called “Right Turn.” • And Louisville Metro Government itself launched Metro Mentors, which allows and encourages city employees to spend two hours of paid time each week working with at-risk youth. • In March, area nonprofits worked with Liberians in our community to fill a huge 12-metre (40 ft) ocean-going container with emergency meals, water purification and medical supplies and equipment for Ebola victims and families and for those suffering the aftermath of the civil war in Liberia
  112. 112. Louisville, KY—Model City
  113. 113. The Compassionate City Charter • Compassionate Cities are communities that recognize that all natural cycles of sickness and health, birth and death, and love and loss occur every day within the orbits of its institutions and regular activities. • A Compassionate City is a community that recognizes that care for one another at times of crisis and loss is not simply a task solely for health and social services but is everyone’s responsibility.
  114. 114. The Compassionate City Charter
  115. 115. The Compassionate City Charter • Compassionate Cities are communities that publicly encourage, facilitate, support and celebrate care for one another during life’s most testing moments and experiences, especially those pertaining to life-threatening and life-limiting illness, chronic disability, frail, ageing and dementia, death in childhood, grief and bereavement, and the trials and burdens of long term care.
  116. 116. Compassionate Cities are communities that publicly encourage, facilitate, support and celebrate care for one another during life’s most testing moments
  117. 117. The Compassionate City Charter • Though local government strives to maintain and strengthen quality services for the most fragile and vulnerable in our midst, those persons are not the limits of our experience of fragility and vulnerability. • Serious personal crises of illness, dying, death and loss may visit any us, at any time during the normal course of our lives. • A compassionate city is a community that squarely recognizes and addresses this social fact
  118. 118. A compassionate city is a community that squarely recognizes and addresses this social fact
  119. 119. The Compassionate City Charter • Through the auspices of the Mayor’s office or equivalent body, a compassionate city will by public marketing and advertising, by use of the city’s network and influences, by virtue of collaboration and co-operation, in partnership with social media and its own offices –develop and support the following 13 social changes to the cities key institutions and activities.
  120. 120. The Compassionate City Charter • 1.Our schools will have annually reviewed policies or guidance documents for dying, death, loss and care. • 2.Our workplaces will have annually reviewed policies or guidance documents for dying, death, loss and care. • 3.Our trade unions will have annually reviewed policies or guidance documents for dying, death, loss and care. • 4.Our places of worship will have at least one dedicated group for end of life care support. • 5.Our city’s hospices and nursing homes will have a community development program involving local area citizens in end of life care activities and programmes
  121. 121. The Compassionate City Charter • 6.Our city’s major museums and art galleries will hold annual exhibitions on the experiences of ageing, dying, death, loss or care. • 7.Our city will host an annual peacetime memorial parade representing the major sectors of human loss outside military campaigns –cancer, motor neuron disease, AIDS, child loss, suicide survivors, animal companion loss, widowhood, industrial and vehicle accidents, the loss of emergency workers and all end of life care personnel, etc.
  122. 122. The Compassionate City Charter • 8.Ourcity will create an incentives scheme to celebrate and highlight the most creative compassionate organization, event, and individual/s. • The scheme will take the form of an annual award administered by a committee drawn from the end of life care sector. • A ‘Mayors Prize’ will recognize individual/s for that year who most exemplify the city’s values of compassionate care.
  123. 123. The Compassionate City Charter
  124. 124. The Compassionate City Charter • 9.Our city will publicly showcase, in print and in social media, our local government policies, services, funding opportunities, partnerships, and public events that address ‘our compassionate concerns’ with living with ageing, life- threatening and life-limiting illness, loss and bereavement, and long term caring. • All end of life care-related services within the city limits will be encouraged to distribute this material or these web links including veterinarians and funeral organizations.
  125. 125. The Compassionate City Charter
  126. 126. The Compassionate City Charter • 10.Our city will work with local social or print media to encourage an annual city- wide short story or art competition that helps raise awareness of ageing, dying, death, loss, or caring.
  127. 127. The Compassionate City Charter • 11.All our compassionate policies and services, and in the policies and practices of our official compassionate partners and alliances, will demonstrate an understanding of how diversity shapes the experience of ageing, dying, death, loss and care –through ethnic, religious, gendered, and sexual identity and through the social experiences of poverty, inequality, and disenfranchisement. • 12.We will seek to encourage and to invite evidence that institutions for the homeless and the imprisoned have support plans in place for end of life care and loss and bereavement.
  128. 128. The Compassionate City Charter
  129. 129. The Compassionate City Charter • 13.Our city will establish and review these targets and goal since the first two year and thereafter will add one more sector annually to our action plans for a compassionate city –e.g. hospitals, further and higher education, charities, community & voluntary organizations, police & emergency services, and so on
  130. 130. The Compassionate City Charter
  131. 131. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign • Helping cities extend the benefits of technology to vulnerable citizens • All over the world, smart technologies are transforming cities. Reducing congestion. Cutting crime. Slashing emissions. Boosting resilience. Modernizing our infrastructure. Giving citizens web and smart phone access to city services. • Yet far too often, these benefits do not extend to those most in need. The poor. The disabled. The homeless. Those without Internet access.
  132. 132. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign
  133. 133. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign • The same digital technology that improves infrastructure can also improve the human condition. • City leaders simply need to know how so they can put it to work for their most vulnerable citizens.
  134. 134. City leaders simply need to know how so they can put it to work for their most vulnerable citizens.
  135. 135. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign • Providing that "know how" is the mission of the Council's new Compassionate Cities effort, a coalition of public, private and philanthropic organizations focused on helping cities help the disadvantaged in four areas: • Food and water • Shelter • Upward mobility • Wellness
  136. 136. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign
  137. 137. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign • Rethinking existing technologies “Our primary objective with this initiative is to reduce suffering in cities through the use of technologies already being applied to solve other city challenges," said Council Executive Director Philip Bane, who is spearheading the Compassionate Cities effort. "This is not about a slew of new technologies cities have to budget for; it's about applying existing smart technologies – from data analytics to social media – to improve living standards for all citizens."
  138. 138. Council Executive Director Philip Bane, who is spearheading the Compassionate Cities effort
  139. 139. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign • United in compassion • Today there is growing momentum to promote compassion in urban centers as populations swell and meeting basic needs becomes even more challenging. • Charter for Compassion International, for example, encourages cities to commit to the principles of its charter that call for making the well-being of all citizens a priority. • The Council's tech-centric approach adds another important dimension to the conversation.
  140. 140. United in compassion
  141. 141. Smart City Council launches Compassionate Cities campaign • The Council's tech-centric approach adds another important dimension to the conversation. • "City leaders know what they want to do," Bane said. • "They want to solve homelessness and hunger. They want to ensure access to clean water and health services. • They want all of their citizens to have a route out of poverty." • The question is how to do it. • The answer oftentimes is technology
  142. 142. Compassionate Cities
  143. 143. Compassionate City • Although the early work of the Charter was focused on building a network of cities, it soon became evident that communities both larger and smaller than cities wanted to join the global movement in which compassion is at the heart of a community’s activities. • The Charter’s growing network of Compassionate Communities now includes cities, towns, townships, shires, hamlets, villages, neighborhoods, islands, states, provinces, counties, republics, and countries.
  144. 144. Compassionate City
  145. 145. Terminology • End-of-life care • End-of-life care refers to health care for a person with a terminal condition that has become advanced, progressive, and/or incurable.
  146. 146. Ethical Reciprocity • Ethical Reciprocity • The social norm of reciprocity is the expectation that people will respond to each other in similar ways responding to gifts and kindnesses from others with similar benevolence of their own, and responding to harmful, hurtful acts from others with either indifference or some form of retaliation.
  147. 147. Ethical Reciprocity
  148. 148. Urban Loneliness • Urban Loneliness • Urban loneliness is a virtual pandemic. • Even though there have never been as many cities across the world as there are right now with such high populations, urban loneliness carries with it huge social, medical and financial consequences.
  149. 149. Books Compassionate Cities: Public Health and End-Of-Life Care by Allan Kellehear
  150. 150. Books Designing the Compassionate City: Creating Places Where People Thrive by Jenny Donovan
  151. 151. References • Charter for Compassion • https://charterforcompassion.org/ • Compassionate Cities • https://phpci.info/become-compassionate-cities • Compassionate Community • https://charterforcompassion.org/communities • Designing the compassionate city • https://theconversation.com/designing-the-compassionate-city-to-overcome-built-in- biases-and-help-us-live-better-92726 • SCC launches Compassionate Cities campaign • https://smartcitiescouncil.com/article/compassionate-cities • Understanding the Unique Challenges of Urban Loneliness • https://www.planetizen.com/blogs/98502-understanding-unique-challenges- urban-loneliness • What Makes a Compassionate City? • https://charterforcompassion.org/what-makes-a-compassionate-city-cci
  152. 152. Thanks..

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