Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

FAO Presentation on CSA

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Nächste SlideShare
CIMMYT presentation on CSA
CIMMYT presentation on CSA
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 19 Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Andere mochten auch (9)

Anzeige

Ähnlich wie FAO Presentation on CSA (20)

Weitere von FMNR Hub (20)

Anzeige

Aktuellste (20)

FAO Presentation on CSA

  1. 1. CSA Implementation Support in Malawi through the MoAIWD (2012-2015) George Phiri Project Technical Coordinator CSA Project (Malawi) FAO/EPIC 1
  2. 2. 2www.fao.org/climatechange/epic Content of Presentation 2  Brief background to the CSA Project  Thrust of CSA Activities Implemented by FAO and MoAIWD  Vision for CSA in Malawi  Entry Points for Scaling Out CSA in Malawi 2
  3. 3. Brief background to the CSA Project 3
  4. 4. Recent Climate Trends in Malawi 4 • Malawi particularly prone to adverse climate hazards: frequent and prolonged dry spells, seasonal droughts, intense rainfall, riverine floods, and flash floods. • Droughts and floods increased in frequency, intensity, and magnitude over the past 20 years. • Significant increasing trends in the frequency of hot days and nights in all seasons. • Mean annual temperature is projected to increase by 1.1 to 3.0°C by the 2060’s, and by 1.5 to 5.0°C by the 2090s. • All models consistently project increases in the proportion of rainfall that falls in heavy events in the annual average of up to 19% by the 2090s.
  5. 5. Agriculture and Climate Change in Malawi 5 • Agriculture (which is mainly rain-fed) is central to Malawi’s economy and livelihoods, and will continue to be fundamental for sustainable development of the country. • In the last 5 years, agriculture has accounted for 35% of GDP, 85% of the labour force and 83% of foreign exchange earnings. • Agriculture is the sector that will be most severely impacted by climate change (NAPA). • Over 50 percent of the population lives below the poverty line and one in five people is chronically food insecure.
  6. 6. Our View in Brief: 6 Agriculture: key sector to address challenges of food security under climate change (sink and source) Ag growth effective means of poverty reduction Projected CC impacts entail an urgent need for the adaptation of the agriculture sector  Mitigation can come through synergistic measures and be an additional source of finance
  7. 7. Thrust of CSA Activities Implemented by FAO and MoAIWD 7
  8. 8. The CSA project aims at building evidence-based agricultural development strategies, policies and investment frameworks to: 1. sustainably increase agricultural productivity and incomes; 2. build resilience and the capacity of agricultural and food systems to adapt to climate change; and 3. seek opportunities to reduce and remove GHGs compatibly with their national food security and development goals.
  9. 9. Approach of the CSA project in Malawi 9 is NOT about… • Providing one-size-fits-all solutions for agricultural technology or practice for the whole world, region, country or sub-national level; • Analyzing GHG emissions reductions potentials as a single driver It IS about… • Providing a context-specific approach to agricultural development; • Based on specific evidences and trends found in Malawi; and • Based on the project methodology which makes a link between research findings, policy making and capacity development
  10. 10. www.fao.org/climatechange/epic Develop a policy environment & agricultural investments to improve food security and provide resilience under climate uncertainty NEEDS RESEARCH COMPONENT What are the barriers to adoption of CSA practices? Legal & Institutional Appraisal: mapping institutional relationships and identifying constraints What are the synergies and tradeoffs between food security, adaptation and mitigation from agricultural practices? POLICY SUPPORT COMPONENT Identifying where policy coordination at the national level is needed and draw recommendations on how to do it Facilitating national participation/inputs to climate and agriculture international policy process Project Framework Evidence Base Strategic Framework & Policy Advice OUTPUTS Investment proposals Capacity Building What are the policy levers to facilitate adoption and what will they cost?
  11. 11. What is special about the CSA Project? Three aspects stand out: • The approach taken brings together, in a coherent framework, economics, institutional analysis, and policy to understand barriers to the adoption of practices; • Matches spatial climate data and household survey data to examine how climate affects economic decisions by households; and • Analyses are structured to be useful in the development of country-owned investment proposals, as well as identifying and building mechanisms to link to financing sources- both Climate Change and Agriculture 11
  12. 12. 1. Evidence: Quantitative and qualitative analyses of primary and secondary data at household and community level combined with institutional and geo-referenced climate data to: a) assess the situation on food security, adaptation and potential mitigation; b) Identify the best CSA options: through the CBA in 4 districts (Balaka, Ntcheu, Kasungu and Mzimba) – 1,433 fields by 524 HH over 11 EPAs; c) Understand barriers to CSA adoption using World Bank LSMS-ISA data; d) Risk management analysis – identification of risk reducing tools; and e) Identify enabling factors. Activities 1/3: Creating a base of evidence
  13. 13. 2. Project coordination unit/core team: keeping a dialogue with members from MoAIWD, and other stakeholders such as NGOs, university, civil society and FAO 3. Policy and institutional mapping: to better understand policy formulation, linkages and potential gaps or conflict/contradictions 4. Institutional data collection: to better understand influence of institutions (i.e. cooperatives, access to credit, subsidies, land tenure etc) in adopting CSA vs conventional agriculture. 5. Supporting country’s policy formulation through policy dialogue and analysis Activities 2/3: Policy component
  14. 14. 6. Coordination between climate change and agricultural policy (e.g. enhancing climate change and agricultural policy alignment in support of CSA, Supporting capacity to link international and national policy issues) 7. Capacity development: • Supporting MSc students, a PhD student and mentoring • Implement training activities to agricultural frontline staff • Support policy makers’ participation to UNFCCC negotiations 8. Collaboration with CCAFS: using scenarios to improve CSA planning 9. Developing a strategic framework for investment in CSA in Malawi Activities 3/3: Capacity building and overarching
  15. 15. Vision for CSA in Malawi
  16. 16. Climate change adapted agriculture sector underpinned by evidence-based planning and programming of an out-scaled and well-coordinated climate-smart agriculture that addresses on-farm and off-farm risks. What is this Vision?
  17. 17. Entry Points for Scaling Out CSA in Malawi
  18. 18. • Malawi - already experiences several climate change effects; most of these frequently negatively impact on agriculture; • Negative impacts of climate change influence the application of agricultural practices/strategies that are most effective in increasing productivity and farm incomes; • CSA represents an approach to building, consolidating and disseminating evidence on climate change effects and effective strategies across the country has been initiated; • Emerging results from Malawi-FAO CSA project - there are several activities planned under ASWAp with high CSA potential (= investments into enabling actions to support CSA) • ASWAp (especially as the next phase is being considered), as well as the launch of the NCCIP provides a good basis for guiding investments. Critical to ensure their coordination – at intra- and inter-sector levels; Entry Points for Scaling Out CSA in Malawi
  19. 19. Thank you www.fao.org/climatechange/epic

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here
  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here
  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here
  • Given these premises and acknowledging progress within the political environment (next slide)
  • Given these premises and acknowledging progress within the political environment (next slide)
  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here
  • Felt the need of linking research with policy and real stuff done in the field.
    What is real stuff in the field? Investments made and farmers switching from conventional  into CSA.
    In a resource based management approach we then back-casted and thought ok: what do you need to prepare an investment proposal well done and have policy makers and stakeholder buying in and really investing on things?
    We needed to find the really best bet options and convince policy makers and donors of those. But first we also needed to be convinced.
    How would we do that?
    Get stakeholders involved up-front and always engaged through dialogue and active participation.
    By providing solid and scientific evidence of which we wanted to be convinced ourselves.
  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here
  • The factors that drive adoption of any one of the practices analysed are distinct, thus
    Adoption of any one practice is conditioned by whether another practice has been adopted or not. Some practices are complementary others are substitutes

    Implications for understanding and overcoming barriers to selection for each practice, distinguishing structural aspects such as exposure from potential interventions at the household or systemic levels linked to adaptive capacity.

    The first finding is based on the analysis of various climate related effects over time and space for Malawi which indicated highly heterogeneous distribution of effects even within a relatively small country such as Malawi. These climate effects have important impacts on which practices are selected and ultimately on their yield benefits. Our results show that farmers in areas of higher mean rainfall and lower maximum temperatures tend to use more inorganic fertilizer, while those in areas of delayed onset of rainfall and higher maximum temperatures were more likely to have SLM practices. Climate risk clearly plays an important role in determining the practices selected. We find that greater climate variability as represented by the coefficient of variation of rainfall and temperature increases adoption of risk-reducing inputs such as SLM measures, but reduce the use of inputs (such as inorganic fertilizer) with riskier benefits under these conditions.
  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here
  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here
  • The geographical distribution of the climate impacts in Malawi measured by these variables over the period 1985-2012
    As can be seen, there are significance differences in terms of rainfall variability across the three geographical regions in Malawi. Districts in the southern region generally have higher exposure to climate impacts relative to those in central and northern Malawi, with lower levels of mean rainfall,
  • You all know what CSA is all about so no need to talk about it here. To identify practices that would be suitable for each context you need to look at these three pillars through engaging policy makers, farmers’union and other relevant stakeholders.

×