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Multilingual Ecologies in the American Southwest Borderland

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Multilingual Ecologies in the American Southwest Borderland

  1. 1. David Gramling and Chantelle Warner University of Arizona, Tucson, USA
  2. 2. Guiding Questions What can an ecological perspective on language and translating tell us about the body politic of an arid, rural, border area between de jure ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ countries? What emergent multilingual landscapes can be documented in such a region, from a language- ecological framework and the subjectivities of the individuals who live and speak within them? What does the meaning-making, speaking body have to do with state / law in this particular border context?
  3. 3. Southern Arizona: Snapshot Almost 20% of Arizonans speak Spanish; approx. 40% Hispanic or Latino 22 Native American tribes in AZ; 25% of the state is tribal land; 4.5% of population identifies as Native American Fifth in US per capita for refugee placements; 2007- 2011, 10% of newcomers to Pima County were refugees
  4. 4. Tucson Weekly May 15, 2014
  5. 5. Today, language users have to navigate much less predictable exchanges in which theinterlocutors use a variety of different languages and dialects for various identification purposes, and exercise symbolic power in various ways to get heard and respected. They are asked to mediate inordinately more complex encounters among interlocutors with multiple language capacities and cultural imaginations, and different social and political memories. (Kramsch 2014: 390) Linguistic Ecologies
  6. 6. Layering of Phenomena “And the connection between such scales is indexical: it resides in the ways in which unique instances of communication can be captured (indexically) as ‘‘framed’’ understandable communication, pointing towards social and cultural norms, genres, traditions, expectations— phenomena of a higher scale level.” (Blommaert 2007: 4)
  7. 7. Local Case Studies Foreign, third languages and multilingual subjectivity Tucson refugees and multiliteracies Trauma, Translation, and Transgender (January 2015) International Partnerships (Center for Middle Eastern Studies) Curriculum Development (New Doctoral Program and Seminars in ‘Translation and Multilingual Studies’
  8. 8. Research Methods semi-structured interviews participant observations ethnography focus groups curriculum development documents and journals
  9. 9. Literature Review: Topics Language Ecology and Complexity Subjectivity and Agency Multiliteracies and Education Translation in the age of Globalization, Internationalization, Localization, and Translation Posthumanism vs. Monolingualism Deixis and Nationality
  10. 10. Open access journal : cms.arizona.edu Focus and Scope The Journal of Critical Multilingualism Studies is a peer-reviewed, transdisciplinary journal of scholarship on multilingualism, monolingualism, and their related social, cultural, historical, and literary/medial phenomena. CMS invites scholarly contributions from various fields that take stock of collective paradigmatic and discursive developments vis-à-vis multilingualism in recent years. CMS seeks to offer diverse fields an opportunity to dialogue with one another across and among various disciplinary conventions and vocabularies, while bearing in mind a diverse scholarly audience.

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