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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners
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Jesus was a friend of tax collectors and sinners

  1. JESUS WAS A FRIEND OF TAX COLLECTORS AND SINNERS EDITED BY GLENN PEASE Matthew 11:19 19The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, 'Here is a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectorsand sinners.'But wisdom is provedright by her deeds." BIBLEHUB RESOURCES Pulpit Commentary Homiletics The JustificationOf Wisdom Matthew 11:19 R. Tuck John's peculiarity was no oddity; it was the powerarrangedfor him in the Divine wisdom. The peculiarity of Jesus was no eccentricity;it was the expressionof that Divine Spirit of wisdom which dwelt in him. Men may criticize the methods of John and Jesus;the story of the ages fully justifies the wisdom of those methods. I. WISDOM USES VARIOUS AGENCIES. "The spiritual unfoldings of wisdom in the religions world are manifold." John moves you by his fear and terror; Jesus moves you by his quiet goodness.John's wisdomthunders; the wisdom of Jesus flows out in mild words. Men "wonder at the gracious words
  2. which proceedfrom his mouth." Through the intellect God appeals to you in one way; and through sympathy in quite another way. How sweetlygentle is electricityin the growth of lilies, and in the generationof birds, bees, butterflies! But in certainconditions it gathers itself up, and flashes in lightning, accompaniedwith terrible artillery. "Wisdomin John Baptistwas ascetic andsincere;in Jesus it was freer, gentler, and sweetlysocial" (Pulsford). We can never fairly judge an agencyuntil we see how it stands in its relation - what it does, what it is calculatedto do. Then what seems insignificant and even unsuitable is plainly seento be an inspiration of wisdom. II. WISDOM IS JUSTIFIED IN THE ADAPTATION OF ITS AGENCIES. Estimate fairly what John had to do, and his austerity and severity are fully justified. Estimate fairly what Jesus has to do, and his friendliness and readiness to enter into the common spheres of life are fully justified. Wisdom is justified in all her methods and changes. III. WISDOM ONLY FALLS TO JUSTIFYITSELF TO A RIVAL WISDOM. "The children of pride and self-will justify Wisdom in no form. They puff up their ownconceitby complaining of every mode in which she presents herself. John comes to them grave enough, earnestas life and death, smiting at the roots of their hereditary nature; but they say, ' What a gloomy fellow!' Jesus comes,bland and winning, ready to sit at table with every class of men; but they say, ' He is fond of a gooddinner and his wine.' So that neither canJohn break them from their old habits, nor Jesus attractthem to the Divine-human life." - R.T.
  3. Biblical Illustrator The Son of man came eating. Matthew 11:19 Christ and common life W. S. Jerome. I. We have here a strong PROOF OF THE HUMANITY OF CHRIST. "The Son of man." His oneness withmen; not exempt from the necessities ofour nature; He was subject to the laws under which we live. No manna fell from heaven for Him. II. Christ ate and drank WITH MEN. Notonly as others, but with others. He was no recluse. Jesus represents the new order, which is a life of liberty, because a life of love. Religionmust be able to endure the strain of life. III. Here Christ SANCTIFIED THE COMMON DUTIES OF EVERYDAY. Nothing is so common as eating and drinking; it is commonplace. The temptation is to make the hours for meals mere feeding times, or to become an epicure. Christ's example guards againstthis. He taught the dignity of our bodies. He who recognizes the body as God's gift will never dishonour its appetites. The daily meals may be family sacraments cheeredby Christian intercourse. Christ came to fit men for this world as wellas for the next. (W. S. Jerome.) Wisdom is justified of her children
  4. T. Manton. I. THE DIFFERENT COURSES OF LIFE WHEREIN JOHN AND JESUS APPEARED. 1. That God sendeth forth His servants with divers dispositions. 2. That men are qualified according to the dispensationwherein God useth them. John, a preacherof repentance, was austere;Christ, as a giver of pardon, mild. 3. That men are apt to complain. 1. Exceptagainstwhat is done by God, and whatsoevermethods are used to reduce them to a sense ofpardon. The censures ofthe two things disliked in Christ were not just. 1. His diet. All our food should be sanctified. 2. His company. II. THE REASONS WHY HE CHOSE THIS SORT OF LIFE. 1. BecauseHe would not place religion in outward austerities and observances. 2. Christ would live a strict, but sociable and charitable life; and did not observe the laws of proud pharisaicalseparation, but spent His time in doing good. 3. Christ came to setus an example, and would take up that course of life most imitable by all sorts of persons. 4. It was fit His form of life should suit with the nature of the kingdom. 5. BecauseChristwould not gratify human wisdom, as He would not gratify sense, by choosing a pompous life, so He would net gratify wisdom by choosing an austere life. 6. To show us the true nature of mortification, which consists not in abstinence and retreat from temptations, but in a spirit fortified againstthem.
  5. III. THE OBSERVANCESWHICH WE MAY BUILD THEREON. 1. We may observe the humanity, goodness, and kindness of that religion which we profess, both with respectto ourselves and others. 2. That external holiness which consistethin an outside strictness without love usually puffeth up men. 3. That a free life, guided by a holy wisdom, is the most sanctifiedlife. (T. Manton.) A friend of publicans and sinners. A friend of publicans and sinners C. H. Spurgeon., Rev. Treffy. I. OUR LORD PROVED HIMSELF IN HIS OWN TIME TO BE THE FRIEND OF SINNERS. 1. He came among them. 2. He sought their goodby His ministry. 3. He showedHis patience towardthem by the contradiction He endured from them. II. WHAT CHRIST IS DOING NOW FOR SINNERS. (C. H. Spurgeon.) I. CHRIST A FRIEND. In a friend we anticipate finding sincere attachment, affectionate concernto promote our welfare, freedomin fellowshipand communication, unflinching fidelity. II. THE DUTY WE OWE TO HIM. Friendliness, gratitude, fellowship, integrity, constancy,
  6. III. THE ADVANTAGES RESULTING FROM THE PERFORMANCEOF IT. The friendship of Christ affords rich consolation, exhaustless supplies, requisite instruction, eternalinheritance. Address the enemies of Christ, the undecided, and His friends. (Rev. Treffy.) But wisdom is justified of her children. Wisdom justified of her children H. Melvill, B. D. I. How WISDOM BECOMES JUSTIFIED TO HER CHILDREN. Notice those respects in which the scheme of Christianity is consideredfoolishness by the world. 1. A strong natural dislike of Christianity is founded on the meanhess of the Saviour's life and the ignominy of His death. The Christian's greatstruggle is with earthly attachments, and he acknowledges withthankfulness the wisdom of any arrangementwhose direct tendency is to help him in the struggle. 2. They often allege the disproportion of the means to the end. Reasoncannot decide how much the pardon of a sin must cost. The converted man sees the heinousness ofsin. He sees that only an infinite sacrifice couldput it away. 3. It is regardedas unsuited to the ends which it proposes to effect, and no heavier charge could be brought againstits wisdom. The idea of substitution is said to encourage men in sin; hut where canwe find higher morality and truer friendship than amongstmen who are trusting in Christ? II. WISDOM IS JUSTIFIED THROUGHHER CHILDREN TO OTHERS. This wisdom is so manifest in the effects of Christianity on the lives of its disciples, that enemies are inexcusable in charging it with foolishness.The children of God must vindicate the wisdom of religion, (H. Melvill, B. D.)
  7. Wisdom justified in her children T. Jackson, M. A. I. WHAT IS THE WISDOM TO WHICH REFERENCEIS HERE MADE. Some suppose our Lord to have meant Himself; in Proverbs it is declaredthat by "Wisdom" God createdthe heavens. The term wisdom is also applied to the doctrine of the true God. "The fear of the Lord that is wisdom." II. To SHOW HOW IT HAS BEEN IN ALL AGES EXPOSED TO THE INDIFFERENCE, CONTEMPT, OR THE MISAPPREHENSIONOF MANKIND. 1. Deny her doctrines. 2. Forgether commands. III. How IT HAS BEEN NEVERTHELESS JUSTIFIED IN ITS CHILDREN. 1. In the life of every saint who has arrived in heaven. "A cloud of witnesses" prove wisdom is justified of her children. 2. Wisdom is justified in all the socialrelationships of life. Is he a husband? wisdom will have given him a new affection. (T. Jackson, M. A.) The world's estimate of religion Studies. I. Evangelicalreligionis CHARACTERIZED, AS WISDOM. As it rightly applies the sublimest knowledge;as it diligently studies the most approved rule; as it zealously prosecutes the most enduring interest. II. EvangelicalreligionHAS BEEN CHARGED WITH FOLLY. Its principles, its feelings, its practices, have been accountedfoolishness.
  8. III. Evangelicalreligionis JUSTIFIED BY THE EXPERIENCE ON ITS POSSESSORS. Theyreceive her doctrines, avow her service, obeyher precepts. (Studies.) Wisdom justified T. Manton. I. WHAT IS THE WISDOM OF GOD IN THE WAY OF SALVATION PRESENTEDBYTHE GOSPEL? The end of the means. II. THAT THIS WISDOM IS DESPISEDAND CONTRADICTEDBY THE CARNAL WORLD. III. HOW AND WHY IT MUST BE JUSTIFIED BYTHE SINCERE PROFESSORSOF THE GOSPEL. 1. It must be approved and received by themselves. 2. It must be professedand owned when it is in contempt in the world. 3. This professionmust be honoured and recommended to others by a holy conversation.Why? 1. Becauseofthe charge that is put upon us to testify for God, and justify His ways. 2. Wisdom deservethto be justified by us. 3. Those who condemn wisdom by their tongues, justify it in some measure by their consciences. 4. If we do not justify religion, we justify the world. 5. Christ will one day justify all His sincere followers. 6. Becauseofthe necessityof justifying wisdom in the times we live in.
  9. (T. Manton.) COMMENTARIES Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (19) Eating and drinking—i.e., as in the feastin Matthew’s house, or at the marriage-feastofCana, sharing in the common life of man. The words point almost specificallyto the two instances just named, and the very form and phrase recallthe question which the Phariseeshad askedofthe disciples, “Why do ye eat and drink with publicans and sinners?” (Luke 5:30). Wisdom is justified of her children.—Literally, was justified. This is our Lord’s answerfor Himself and the Baptist to the contradictorycalumnies of the Jews. Menmight accusewisdom, true heavenly wisdom, on this ground or that, but she would be, or rather (the tense implying a generalisedfact)is evermore acquitted, justified, acknowledgedas righteous, alike in her severer or more joyous forms, by all who are indeed her children, i.e., by all who seek and love her as the mother of their peace and joy. Like so many of our Lord’s other sayings, the parable stretches far and wide through the ages. The evil world rejects all who seek to overcome its evil, some on one pretext, some on another; but true seekers afterwisdomwill welcome holiness in whatever form it may appear, cheerful or ascetic,Protestantor Romish, Puritan or liberal, so long as it is real and true. Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary 11:16-24 Christ reflects on the scribes and Pharisees, who had a proud conceit of themselves. He likens their behaviour to children's play, who being out of temper without reason, quarrel with all the attempts of their fellows to please them, or to get them to join in the plays for which they used to assemble. The
  10. cavils of worldly men are often very trifling and show greatmalice. Something they have to urge againstevery one, however excellentand holy. Christ, who was undefiled, and separate from sinners, is here representedas in league with them, and polluted by them. The most unspotted innocence will not always be a defence againstreproach. Christ knew that the hearts of the Jews were more bitter and hardened againsthis miracles and doctrines, than those of Tyre and Sidon would have been; therefore their condemnation would be the greater. The Lord exerciseshis almighty power, yet he punishes none more than they deserve, and never withholds the knowledge ofthe truth from those who long after it. Barnes'Notes on the Bible But whereunto shall I liken ... - Christ proceeds to reprove the inconsistency and fickleness ofthat age of people. He says they were like children - nothing pleasedthem. He refers here to the "plays" or "sports" of children. Instrumental music, or piping and dancing, were used in marriages and festivals as a sign of joy. See the notes at Isaiah 5:11-12. Compare Job21:11; 2 Samuel 6:14; Judges 11:34;Luke 15:25. Children imitate their parents and others, and actover in play what they see done by others. Among their childish sports, therefore, was probably an imitation of a wedding or festal occasion. We have seenalso (the notes at Matthew 9:23) that funerals were attended with mournful music, and lamentation, and howling. It is not improbable that children also, in play: imitated a mournful funeral procession. One part are representedas sullen and dissatisfied. They would not enter into the play: nothing pleasedthem. The others complained of it. We have, said they, takenall pains to please you. We have piped to you, have played lively tunes, and have engagedin cheerful sports, but you would not join with us; and then we have played different games, and imitated the mourning at funerals, and you are equally sullen; "you have not lamented;" you have not joked with us. Nothing pleases you. So, said Christ, is this generationof people. "John" came one way, "neither eating nor drinking," abstaining as a Nazarite, and you were not pleasedwith him. I, the Son of man, have come in a different manner, "eating and drinking;" not practicing any austerity, but living like other people, and you are equally dissatisfied - nay, you are less pleased. You calumniate him, and abuse me for not doing the
  11. very thing which displeasedyou in John. Nothing pleases you. You are fickle, changeable, inconstant, and abusive. Markets - Places to sellprovisions; places of concourse,where also children flockedtogetherfor play. We have piped - We have played on musical instruments. A "pipe" was a wind instrument of music often used by shepherds. Neither eating nor drinking - That is, abstaining from some kinds of food and wine, as a Nazarite. It does not mean that he did not eat at all, but that he was remarkable for abstinence. He hath a devil - He is actuatedby a bad spirit. He is irregular, strange, and cannot be a goodman. The Son of man came eating and drinking - That is, living as others do; not practicing austerity; and they accuse him of being fond of excess, and seeking the societyofthe wicked. Gluttonous - One given to excessive eating. Wine-bibber - One who drinks much wine. Jesus undoubtedly lived according to the generalcustoms of the people of his time. He did not affectsingularity; he did not separate himselfas a Nazarite;he did not practice severe austerities. He ate that which was commonand drank that which was common. As wine was a common article of beverage among the people, he drank it. It was the pure juice of the grape, and for anything that can be proved, it was without fermentation. In regard to the kind of wine which was used, see the notes at John 2:10. No one should plead the example, at any rate, in favor of making use of the wines that are commonly used in this country - wines, many of which are manufactured here, and without a particle of the pure juice of the grape, and most of which are mixed with noxious drugs to give them colorand flavor. Wisdom is justified of her children - The children of wisdom are the wise - those who understand. The Saviourmeans that though that generationof Pharisees andfault-finders did not appreciate the conduct of John and
  12. himself, yet the "wise,"the candid - those who understood the reasons of their conduct - would approve of and do justice to it. Jamieson-Fausset-BrownBible Commentary 2. Now when John had heard in the prison—Forthe accountof this imprisonment, see on [1261]Mr6:17-20. the works ofChrist, he sent, &c.—Onthe whole passage, seeon[1262]Lu 7:18-35. Matthew Poole's Commentary Ver. 18,19. Luke hath the same words, Luke 7:33-35. The sense of the words is this: God hath by his providence used all means to win this people to the gospel. The doctrine of John the Baptist and Christ was the same, but their temper and converse was very different: John was an austere and morose man, Christ was of a more free and familiar conversation;but these men would neither give the one nor the other a goodword; they reviled both of them, and rejectedthem both, and the doctrine which they brought. John came neither eating nor drinking, that is, not as other men ordinarily do; he was a man that lived most in the wilderness, and fed upon very ordinary diet, not eating with publicans and sinners, not coming at any feasts, &c.;and they said of him, He hath a devil; he is a melancholic, hypochondriac fellow, a kind of a madman. The Son of man came eating and drinking, he was of a more affable, pleasant temper, of a more free and less reservedconverse, eating and drinking as other men (though keeping to the law of temperance)such things as the country afforded, not refusing to be present at feasts, though publicans and sinners were there. They said of him, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners: he displeasedthem with the two greatfreedom of his conversation;from whence, by the way, they may be better instructed, who place some perfection, or merit, in living like monks
  13. and hermits; by that rule John the Baptistwas to be preferred before Christ. But Christ could please the Pharisees and lawyers, and their followers, no more than John did. They could not sayhe was melancholic or morose;but they blasphemed him to a higher degree, calling him a glutton and drunkard, and a friend of publicans and sinners. A godly man, let his temper and converse be what it will, pleasethnone who hateth the truth of the gospel, and the powerof godliness. If he be reserved, then he is a morose, melancholic man; if he be of a more free and open converse, then he is a drunkard, or a glutton; something or other they must have to say againsta man that will not run with them to the same excessofriot, though they lay to their charge things that they know not. The business is, they hate the powerof godliness in them. This instance of these men’s thus treating John the Baptist and Christ, is of mighty use to strengthen those who meet with the very same things. But wisdom is justified of her children. There is a greatvariety amongst interpreters in giving the sense of these words. Some think them spoken ironically, for the Pharisees wentfor the children of wisdom. Some think them spokenplainly, and think it should be, wisdom is judged, or condemned, of her children; but though the word dikaioomai, signifying to justice or do justice to another, which, according to the merit or demerit of the person, may be by justifying or condemning, upon which accountit was true here that wisdom was condemned of those who pretended to be her children, and the word is so used in other authors, yet we have no such usage ofit in Scripture. Not to reckonthe various senses others put upon the words, the plain sense of them seems to be this. It is a proverbial speech, something like that, Ars non habet inimicum praeterignorantem, Learning hath no enemies but the ignorant. 1. I, who am the Wisdom of God, am justified by you, who truly believe on me: you know I am no glutton, no winebibber, no friend of publicans and sinners. Or;
  14. 2. Grace is justified of all that are partakers of it. Godly men that are wise will own the grace of God in all men, whether they be of John’s temper or of mine, whether of more austere or more pleasanttempers. Or; 3. The wise counselof God, making use of severalinstruments of several tempers to win these people unto his gospel, will be justified, that is, acquitted, defended, praised, adored of those who belong unto God, and are acquainted with his wisdom and counsels. Luke saith, The people justified God, Luke 7:29. Some, by the children of wisdom, understand the scribes and Phariseesthemselves, (who thought themselves the children of wisdom), or the generality of the Jews, who were condemned in their own consciences, and could not but in heart justify Christ, though in their speechesthey condemned him. But Christ never calledthem the children of wisdom. This interpretation therefore seemethsomething strained. That which seemeththe most natural is what I before hinted. Though those that pretend to be the children of wisdom thus speak of John and of me, yet those who are truly wise will justify me, and also the counsels and wisdom of my Father in the use of all means to bring them to receive the glad tidings of salvation, brought to them both by my more austere and reservedforerunner, and by myself, who have chosen, though a holy and unblamable, yet a more free and pleasantway of converse with them. Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible The sonof man came eating and drinking,.... Meaning himself, who ate and drank as men usually do, lived in the common way of life, was free and sociable, wentto feasts, entertainments, and weddings, when he was invited; and was affable, courteous, and friendly in his deportment, to all men; and they say, behold a man gluttonous, a voracious man, an epicurean, one that indulges his appetite to a very greatdegree, and in a scandalous manner;
  15. a winebibber, a common tippler, one that drinks to excess;whom the Rabbins call (k), who is one, they say, that drinks up his cup at one draught; one that is given to wine, and is greedy of it: a friend of publicans and sinners; such as are openly and notoriously wicked; and loves their company, for the sake oftippling with them; and encourages them in their revelling and drunkenness; a very black charge this! But wisdom is justified of her children; either the wisdom of God, in making use of ministers of a different dispositionand deportment, whereby some are gained, and others left inexcusable:or the Gospel, in which there is such a display of divine wisdom, which is vindicated from the charge of licentiousness, by the agreeable lives and conversations ofthe children of God: or rather Christ himself, who is the wisdom of God; and in whom are hid all the treasures ofwisdom and knowledge;who, howeverhe may be traduced by ignorant and malicious men, yet will be acquitted from all such charges, as here insinuated, by all the true sons of wisdom; or by such, who are made wise unto salvation. We may learn from hence, that no sort of preachers and preaching will please some men; that the best of Gospelministers may be reproachedas libertines, or madmen; and that they will be sooner, orlater, justified and clearedfrom all such aspersions. (k) T. Bab. Pesachim, fol. 86. 2. Betza, fol. 25. 2. Geneva Study Bible The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners. {4} But {f} wisdom is justified of her children. (4) That which the many refuse, the electand chosenembrace. (f) Wise men acknowledgethe wisdom of the gospelwhen they receive it. EXEGETICAL(ORIGINAL LANGUAGES) Expositor's Greek Testament
  16. Matthew 11:19. ὁ υἱὸς τ. ἀ.: obviously Jesus here refers to Himself in third person where we might have expectedthe first. Again the now familiar title, defining itself as we go along by varied use, pointing Jesus out as an exceptionalperson, while avoiding all conventionalterms to define the exceptionalelement.—ἐσθίωνκαὶ πίνων: the “Sonof Man” is one who eats and drinks, i.e., non-ascetic and social, one of the marks interpretative of the title = human, fraternal.—καὶ λέγουσι, and they say:what? One is curious to know. Surely this genial, friendly type of manhood will please!—ἰδοὺ, lo! scandalisedsanctimoniousnesspoints its finger at Him and utters gross, outrageous calumnies.—φάγος, οἰνοπότης, φίλος, aneaterwith emphasis = a glutton (a word of late Greek, Lob., Phryn., 434), a wine-bibber; and, worse than either, for φίλος is used in a sinister sense and implies that Jesus was the comrade of the worstcharacters, andlike them in conduct. A malicious nick- name at first, it is now a name of honour: the sinner’s lover. The Sonof Man takes these calumnies as a thing of course and goes onHis gracious way. It is not necessaryto reflect these characteristicsofJesus and John back into the parable, and to identify them with the piping and wailing children. Yet the parable is so constructedas to exhibit them very clearlyin their distinctive peculiarities by representing the children not merely employed in play and quarrelling over their games, whichwould have sufficed as a picture of the religious Jews, but as playing at marriages and funerals, the former symbolising the joy of the Jesus-circle, the latter the sadness ofthe Baptist- circle (vide my Parabolic Teaching ofChrist, p. 420).—καὶ ἐδικαιώθη,etc. This sentence wears a gnomic or proverbial aspect(“verba proverbium redolere videntur,” Kuinoel, similarly, Rosenmüller), and the aorist of ἐδικ. may be taken as an instance of the gnomic aorist, expressive of what is usual; a law in the moral sphere, as elsewhere the aorist is employed to express the usual course in the natural sphere, e.g., in Jam 1:11. Weiss-Meyerstrongly denies that there are any instances ofsuch use of the aoristin the N. T. (On this aoristvide Goodwin, Syntax, p. 53, and Bäumlein, § 523, where it is called the aoristof experience, “der Erfahrungswahrheit”.)—ἀπὸ, in, in view of (vide Buttmann’s Gram., p. 232, onἀπὸ in N. T.).—ἔργων:the reading of [68] [69], and likely to be the true one just because τέκνωνis the reading in Luke. It is an appeal to results, to fruit (Matthew 7:20), to the future. Historicalin form, the statementis in reality a prophecy. Resch, indeed (Agrapha, p. 142), takes
  17. ἐδικ. as the (erroneous)translation of the Hebrew prophetic future used in the Aramaic original = now we are condemned, but wait a while. The καὶ at the beginning of the clause is not = “but”. It states a fact as much a matter of course as is the condemnation of the unwise. Wisdom, condemned by the foolish, is always, of course, justified in the long run by her works orby her children. [68] CodexSinaiticus (sæc. iv.), now at St. Petersburg, published in facsimile type by its discoverer, Tischendorf, in 1862. [69] CodexVaticanus (sæc. iv.), published in photographic facsimile in 1889 under the care of the Abbate Cozza-Luzi. Cambridge Bible for Schools andColleges 19. But wisdom is justified of her children] Wisdom = “divine wisdom”—God regardedas the All Wise. Justified = “is accountedrighteous”—“isacquitted of folly.” Of her children = “by the divinely wise.” The spiritual recognisethe wisdom of God, both in the austerity of John and in the loving mercy of Jesus who condescends to eat with publicans and sinners. The word translated but should be and. Either the adversative force lies rather in the whole sentence than in the particle, or the Greek καί is put for the Hebrew connecting particle vau, which is sometimes adversative. Bengel's Gnomen Matthew 11:19. Ἄνθρωπος φάγος, κ.τ.λ., a gluttonous man, etc.) They distinguish Him, as one out of many, by a distinction opposedto that mentioned in the preceding verse.—τῶντέκνων, children) we have shown, in the Apparatus,[532]that τῶν ἔργων—works—wasancientlya widely received reading. Ambrose, on Luke 7:35, says:—“Therefore wisdomis justified of all her children.[533]It is well said ‘of all,’ because justice is observedtowards all
  18. [i.e. in God’s dealings with all], so that the faithful may be accepted, the unfaithful rejected. Very many of the Greeks adoptthe reading, ‘Wisdom is justified of all her works,’because it is the work of justice to observe the due measure towards the merit of every single individual.” He, however, appears to mean the codices ofSt Matthew, not those of St Luke, for he is in the habit of recurring to them from time to time, although he is commenting on St Luke.[534]—ΑὐΤῆς[535])Valla[536]thinks that this refers to γενεᾶς; but see Luke 7:35, where there are more remarks on the present passage. Cf. Luke 11:31. [No doubt Christ is the Wisdom meant. The children of Wisdom are those who suffer themselves to be gatheredby her into her company. It is for this reasonthat Wisdom is blamed on the ground of too simple and ready indulgence towards such persons, and she is therefore thus compelled at last to justify herself. Luke 15:1-2, etc.—V. g.] [532]In the Apparatus, p. 117, he says— [533]The first sentence is not quoted by Bengel, but, on referring to the original. I consideredthe meaning so much plainer with it than without it, that I took the liberty of inserting it. The passagein Ambrose stands thus:— [534]Luke, Luke 7:35, adds πάντων. B correctedlater, reads, as the MSS. alluded to by Ambrose, τῶν ἔργων: so MSS. in Jerome, both Syriac and Memph. Versions. But Dac Vulg., Orig., Hil. and Rec. Text, read τέκνων.— ED. [535]Gen. fem. sing, of αὐτὸς. E. V. renders it her, sc. Wisdom’s. Valla would render it of it, sc. of this generation.—(I. B.)
  19. [536]LAURENTIUS VALLA, one of the most distinguished Latin scholars of the fifteenth century. Born in Rome about 1406;became Professorof Eloquence, first at Pavia, and afterwards at Milan; went to Rome in 1443, and became canonof St John the Lateran. Died 1457. He published, besides many other works, annotations on the N. T.—(I. B.) “Justificata estergo Sapientia ab omnibus filiis suis. Bene ab omnibus, quia circa omnes justitia servatur; ut susceptio fiat fidelium rejectio perfidorum. Undeplerique Græcisic habent: Justificata estSapientia ab omnibus operibus suis; quod opus justitiæ sit, circa unius cujuscunque meritum servare mensuram.”—(I. B.) “19)τέκνων) operibus notat Hieronymus in Evangeliis quibusdam legi, in Comm. ad h. l. sic vero etiam Æth. Copt. Pers. Syr. Videtur Græcus librarius antiquissimus pro τῶν τέκνων in maxima literarum similitudine, legisse τῶν ἔργων. Quæ strictura docere nos possit, ex Græco Matthæi Evangelio deductum esse EvangeliumNazarenorum [an apocryphal gospelso called], quippe quod hoc loco sine dubio respexitHieronymus. Eundem varietatem, ex Hieronymo, ut apparet, notavit Hafenrefferus in edit. suâ N. T.”—(I. B.) Pulpit Commentary Verse 19. - The Son of man (Matthew 8:20, note) came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold (ἰδού, simply demonstrative, as in the LXX. of 1 Samuel 24:12;2 Samuel 24:22) a man gluttonous (a gluttonous man, RevisedVersion, for the Greek, ἄνθρωπος φάγος, merelyreproduced the original Semitic order), and a wine-bibber, a friend of publicans and sinners (Matthew 9:10, note). A friend. The idea of affection, which through common use of the words has fallen so much into the backgroundboth in the Greek φίλος and our English "friend," is brought out clearly in the Syriac roh'mo, which is, perhaps, the very word that our Lord spoke. But; and (RevisedVersion); καί: i.e. and yet, whatever you may say. Wisdom; i.e. the Divine wisdom, by which all creationwas made (Proverbs 8:22-31;Wisd. 7:22), and which is the source
  20. of all true understanding (Proverbs 8:12-16), particularly of the will of God (Wisd. 7:27, 28;comp. Luke 11:49, "The Wisdom of God" speaking in Scripture). Is justified (ἐδικαιώθη). The aoristis used either as expressing what is wont to happen (Madvig, § 111, Romans a), or perhaps as expressing the completenessofthe justi fication, (cf. ἐβλήθη, John 15:6). Nosgen, contrary to New Testamentusage, under stands ἐδικαιώθη as meaning "is condemned because ofher works" ("So habensie die Weisheit... um ihrer Werke willen ve rurtheilt"), but the ordinary interpreta tion holds goodthat she is acquitted of any error or wrong. Of her children; works (Revised Version); ἀπὸ τῶν ἔργων αὐτῆς, with the Sinaitic manuscript and the original hand of the Vatican, besides some of the versions. The common reading, τέκνων, has come from Luke. In these words lie the chief difficulty of this difficult sentence. Of(ἀπό) may be used of agents (comp. James 1:13; James 5:4: Luke 6:18, almostas though it were ὑπό), but it is more natural to understand it here of the causes orreasons forthe verdict. And ἀπό thus gives au excellent sense. OurLord says that the Divine Wisdom is justified in the minds of men from the results she brings about. Of what is he thinking? Doubtless moral results, and probably those found in the change that might be seenin the publicans and sinners of which he has just been speaking. The Divine Wisdom, which appearedto the carelessand unsympathetic so strange and changeable in her methods, is, notwithstanding, pronounced to be in the right, because ofthe results of her activity, the men and the women brought under her influence. These κανιναὶ κτίσεις (2 Corinthians 5:17; Galatians 6:15) are always the best justification of misunderstood plans. While, however, this seems the best interpretation of the sentence as recordedin Matthew, it must be confessedthat in Luke it appears more natural to understand "her children" as those who justify her; and further, this was probably St. Luke's own interpretation. For he seems to purposely give an explanation of the apothegmin the verses (Luke 7:29, 30)by which he joins the equivalent of our vers. 16-19 to the equivalent of our ver. 11. He there tells us that all the people and the publicans "justified God," having been baptized with the baptism of John, but the Phariseesand the lawyers rejectedGod's plan towards them, not having been baptized by him. Wisdom's children justified her; others did not. Anyhow, ἔργων would appear to be the more original of the two terms, for with the explanation preferred above, τέκνων
  21. would be very easilyderived from it. It may, indeed, be due to a more primitive confusion between ‫ע‬ ֹ‫ב‬ ֹ‫ד‬ ֹ‫ה‬ָ‫א‬ ("her works," cf. Ecclesiastes9:1) and ‫ע‬ ֹ‫ב‬ ֹ‫ד‬ ָּ‫ה‬ָ‫א‬ ("her servants," Hebrew ‫ד‬ ֶ‫ה‬ֶ‫,)א‬ this last word being commonly rendered δοῦλοι, and, perhaps through παῖδες, even υἱοί and τέκνα (cf. Reseh, ' Agrapha,' p. 277), but even then it is unlikely that the former and harder reading should be only due to a mistake for the latter. That the harder and metaphoricalshould be changed into the easierand more literal, even as early as St. Luke's time, appears much more probable. PRECEPT AUSTIN RESOURCES BARCLAY The AccentOf SorrowfulRebuke (Matthew 11:16-19) 11:16-19 "To whatwill I compare this generation? It is like children in the market-place, calling to their companions, and saying, 'We piped to you and you did not dance; we wailed and you did not mourn.' ForJohn came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, 'The man is mad.' The Sonof Man came eating and drinking, and they say, 'Look you, a gluttonous man and a wine- drinker, the friend of tax-collectors andsinners.' But wisdom is shown to be right by her deeds." Jesus was saddenedby the sheer perversity of human nature. To him men seemedto be like children playing in the village square. One group said to the other: "Come on and let's play at weddings," and the others said, "We don't feel like being happy today." Then the first group said, "All right; come on and let's play at funerals," and the others said, "We don't feel like being sad today." They were what the Scots callcontrary. No matter what was offered, they found a fault in it.
  22. John came, living in the desert, fasting and despising food, isolatedfrom the societyof men; and they saidof him, "The man is mad to cut himself off from human societyand human pleasures like that." Jesus came, mixing with all kinds of people, sharing in their sorrows and their joys, companying with them in their times of joy; and they said of him, "He is a socialite;he is a party-goer; he is the friend of outsiders with whom no decentperson would have anything to do." They calledJohn's asceticismmadness;and they called Jesus'sociabilitylaxness of morals. They could find a ground of criticism either way. The plain fact is that when people do not want to listen to the truth, they will easilyenough find an excuse for not listening to it. They do not even try to be consistentin their criticisms;they will criticize the same person, and the same institution, from quite opposite grounds. If people are determined to make no response they will remain stubbornly unresponsive no matter what invitation is made to them. Grown men and womencan be very like spoiled children who refuse to play no matter what the game is. Then comes Jesus'final sentence in this section:"Wisdomis shownto be right by her deeds." The ultimate verdict lies not with the cantankerous and perverse critics but with events. The Jews might criticize John for his lonely isolation, but John had moved men's hearts to God as they had not been moved for centuries; the Jews might criticize Jesus for mixing too much in ordinary life and with ordinary people, but in him people were finding a new life and a new goodness anda new power to live as they ought and a new access to God. It would be well if we were to stopjudging people and churches by our own prejudices and perversities; and if we were to begin to give thanks for any person and any church who canbring people nearer to God, even if their methods are not the methods which suit us. BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATOR
  23. Verse 19 Matthew 11:19 The Son of man came eating. Christ and common life I. We have here a strong proof of the humanity of Christ. “The Son of man.” His oneness withmen; not exempt from the necessities ofour nature; He was subject to the laws under which we live. No manna fell from heaven for Him. II. Christ ate and drank with men. Not only as others, but with others. He was no recluse. Jesus represents the new order, which is a life of liberty, because a life of love. Religionmust be able to endure the strain of life. III. Here Christ sanctifiedthe common duties of every day. Nothing is so common as eating and drinking; it is commonplace. The temptation is to make the hours for meals mere feeding times, or to become an epicure. Christ’s example guards againstthis. He taught the dignity of our bodies. He who recognizes the body as God’s gift will never dishonour its appetites. The daily meals may be family sacraments cheeredby Christian intercourse. Christ came to fit men for this world as well as for the next. (W. S. Jerome.) Wisdom is justified of her children I. The different courses oflife wherein john and Jesus appeared. 1. That God sendeth forth His servants with divers dispositions.
  24. 2. That men are qualified according to the dispensationwherein God useth them. John, a preacherof repentance, was austere;Christ, as a giver of pardon, mild. 3. That men are apt to complain. 1. Exceptagainstwhat is done by God, and whatsoevermethods are used to reduce them to a sense ofpardon. The censures ofthe two things disliked in Christ were not just. 1. His diet. All our food should be sanctified. 2. His company. II. The reasons whyhe chose this sortof life. 1. BecauseHe would not place religion in outward austerities and observances. 2. Christ would live a strict, but sociable and charitable life; and did not observe the laws of proud pharisaicalseparation, but spent His time in doing good. 3. Christ came to setus an example, and would take up that course of life most imitable by all sorts of persons. 4. It was fit His form of life should suit with the nature of the kingdom. 5. BecauseChristwould not gratify human wisdom, as He would not gratify sense, by choosing a pompous life, so He would net gratify wisdom by choosing an austere life. 6. To show us the true nature of mortification, which consists not in abstinence and retreat from temptations, but in a spirit fortified againstthem. III. The observanceswhichwe may build thereon.
  25. 1. We may observe the humanity, goodness, and kindness of that religion which we profess, both with respectto ourselves and others. 2. That external holiness which consistethin an outside strictness without love usually puffeth up men. 3. That a free life, guided by a holy wisdom, is the most sanctifiedlife. (T. Manton.) A friend of publicans and sinners. A friend of publicans and sinners I. Our Lord proved himself in his own time to be the friend of sinners. 1. He came among them. 2. He sought their goodby His ministry. 3. He showedHis patience towardthem by the contradiction He endured from them. II. What Christ is doing now for sinners. (C. H. Spurgeon.) I. Christ a friend. In a friend we anticipate finding sincere attachment, affectionate concernto promote our welfare, freedomin fellowshipand communication, unflinching fidelity. II. The duty we owe to him. Friendliness, gratitude, fellowship, integrity, constancy,
  26. III. The advantages resulting from the performance of it. The friendship of Christ affords rich consolation, exhaustlesssupplies, requisite instruction, eternal inheritance. Address the enemies of Christ, the undecided, and His friends. (Rev. Treffy.) But wisdom is justified of her children.- Wisdom justified of her children I. How wisdom becomes justified to her children. Notice those respects in which the scheme of Christianity is consideredfoolishness by the world. 1. A strong natural dislike of Christianity is founded on the meanhess of the Saviour’s life and the ignominy of His death. The Christian’s greatstruggle is with earthly attachments, and he acknowledges withthankfulness the wisdom of any arrangementwhose direct tendency is to help him in the struggle. 2. They often allege the disproportion of the means to the end. Reasoncannot decide how much the pardon of a sin must cost. The converted man sees the heinousness ofsin. He sees that only an infinite sacrifice couldput it away. 3. It is regardedas unsuited to the ends which it proposes to effect, and no heavier charge could be brought againstits wisdom. The idea of substitution is said to encourage men in sin; hut where canwe find higher morality and truer friendship than amongstmen who are trusting in Christ? II. Wisdom is justified through her children to others. This wisdom is so manifest in the effects of Christianity on the lives of its disciples, that enemies are inexcusable in charging it with foolishness. The children of God must vindicate the wisdom of religion, (H. Melvill, B. D.) Wisdom justified in her children
  27. I. What is the wisdomto which reference is here made. Some suppose our Lord to have meant Himself; in Proverbs it is declaredthat by “Wisdom” God createdthe heavens. The term wisdom is also applied to the doctrine of the true God. “The fearof the Lord that is wisdom.” II. To show how it has been in all ages exposedto the indifference, contempt, or the misapprehensionof mankind. 1. Deny her doctrines. 2. Forgether commands. III. How it has been nevertheless justified in its children. 1. In the life of every saint who has arrived in heaven. “A cloud of witnesses“ prove wisdom is justified of her children. 2. Wisdom is justified in all the socialrelationships of life. Is he a husband? wisdom will have given him a new affection. (T. Jackson, M. A.) The world’s estimate of religion I. Evangelicalreligionis characterized, as wisdom. As it rightly applies the sublimest knowledge;as it diligently studies the most approved rule; as it zealouslyprosecutes the most enduring interest. II. Evangelicalreligionhas been chargedwith folly. Its principles, its feelings, its practices, have been accountedfoolishness. III. Evangelicalreligionis justified by the experience on its possessors.They receive her doctrines, avow her service, obeyher precepts. (Studies.)
  28. Wisdom justified I. What is the wisdomof God in the way of salvation presentedby the gospel? The end of the means. II. That this wisdom is despisedand contradictedby the carnalworld. III. How and why it must be justified by the sincere professors ofthe gospel. 1. It must be approved and received by themselves. 2. It must be professedand owned when it is in contempt in the world. 3. This professionmust be honoured and recommended to others by a holy conversation. Why? 1. Becauseofthe charge that is put upon us to testify for God, and justify His ways. 2. Wisdom deservethto be justified by us. 3. Those who condemn wisdom by their tongues, justify it in some measure by their consciences. 4. If we do not justify religion, we justify the world. 5. Christ will one day justify all His sincere followers. 6. Becauseofthe necessityof justifying wisdom in the times we live in. (T. Manton.)
  29. ALAN CARR JESUS:THE FRIEND OF SINNERS Intro: It has been said that a dog is man's best friend. It doesn't seemto matter what you do to your dog, he just keeps onloving you just the same. There are times when I am on the outs with everyone in our home, but that little dog of ours will come and remind me that she still cares. If you had a million dollars and a dog, you would have a million so-calledfriends and a dog. If you lose the million dollars and have nothing left, those million friends would also be gone, but you would still have the dog. He doesn't care about money, titles, position or privilege. All he asks is for the privilege of being near his master. If you speak his name, you make his day. If you pet him on the head, he thinks he is in dog heaven. His love is unselfish and undying. He is as constantin his love as the sun is in its course acrosshe heavens. I suppose it is true that among all the animals in God's vast creation, there is no greater friend to mankind than the dog. Sadly, most men do not experience that kind of devotion in their human friendships. Here is what some have said regarding human friendships: Friendship is but another name for an alliance with the follies and the misfortunes of others. Our own share of miseries is sufficient: why enter then as volunteers into those of another? Thomas Jefferson(1743-1826), U.S. president. Letter, 12 Oct. 1786, to Maria Cosway. Friendship is a disinterestedcommerce betweenequals; love, an abject intercourse betweentyrants and slaves. Oliver Goldsmith (1728-74), Anglo-Irishauthor, poet, playwright. Mr. Honeywood, in The GoodNatur'd Man, act1. Old friendships are like meats served up repeatedly, cold, comfortless, and distasteful. The stomachturns againstthem.
  30. William Hazlitt (1778-1830), Englishessayist. The Plain Speaker, "Onthe Pleasure ofHating" (1826). The most fatal disease offriendship is gradualdecay, or dislike hourly increasedby causes too slenderfor complaint, and too numerous for removal. Samuel Johnson(1709-84), Englishauthor, lexicographer. The Idler, no. 23, in Universal Chronicle (London, 23 Sept. 1758;repr. in Works of Samuel Johnson, vol. 2, ed. by W. J. Bate, John M. Bullitt and L. F. Powell, 1963). It seems evident from these quotes that these men think friendship to be a brittle and weak thing. Thankfully not everyone agrees withthis interpretation. The greatestsweetenerofhuman life is Friendship. To raise this to the highest pitch of enjoyment, is a secretwhich but few discover. JosephAddison (1672-1719), Englishessayist. Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, andPoeticalFragments, "OfFriendship" (1794). To the query, "What is a friend?" his reply was "A single soul dwelling in two bodies." Aristotle (384-322 B.C.),Greek philosopher. Quotedin: DiogenesLaertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, "Aristotle," bk. 5, sct. 20. A friend may well be reckonedthe masterpiece ofNature. Ralph Waldo Emerson(1803-82), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Essays, "Friendship" (First Series, 1841). As you journey through life, you will make and lose friends. It is just the way things are! Thank God for the friends you have and pray for those you don't have any longer. But, as you travel, remember that there is a Friend who outshines all the friends you will make, or lose, along life's way. He was called, "A friend of sinners" by His enemies. I think in all the Bible, there is no sweetername to given to the Lord Jesus Christ than this. To think that those
  31. who are called the enemies of Godhave, for themselves, a Friend of such noble stature and quality as Jesus. He is the Friend of the friendless! When we look into the Word of God, we are met with this word "friend" many times. In severalof these places, the Bible gives us a definition of just what a friend really is. Therefore, I would like to apply the acid test of the Word of God to the Lord Jesus and show you that He is the sinner's Friend! Notice some traits that prove this truth. I. Jn. 15:12-13 A REAL FRIEND SACRIFICES 12 This is my commandment, That ye love one another, as I have loved you. 13 Greaterlove hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. 14 Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoeverI command you. 15 Henceforth I call you not servants;for the servantknoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have calledyou friends; for all things that I have heard of my FatherI have made known unto you. John 15:12-15 A. Perhaps you have had a friend for which you would do anything. Or, perhaps you have been fortunate enough to have a friend that would do anything for you. If so, then be glad, for a friend of that degree is a rare thing! B. These verses teachus the truth that Jesus lovedus so much that He was willing to die in our place on the cross. Evenwhen were His enemies and lost in sin, He still willingly died for us, Rom. 8:7; Rom. 5:6-8. C. (Ill. Many think they need a friend with money, or power, or prestige, or influence, or a million other things the world places its hopes on. In truth, the sinner needs a friend who can save him from his sins and keephim out of Hell. Jesus, and Jesus alone, is that Friend! A thousand others could have died, but none other could have paid the sinner's due! Jesus died so that sinners might live in Him! The righteous died for the unrighteous. Jesus proved that He was and is the sinner's best Friend!)
  32. (Jack Lawlertells this story: "Nearmy office is a storage lockerbuilding. A shabbily-dressed little man kept his tools and ran his yard maintenance business from one of them. We spoke daily. One day, he claspedmy arm and askedif he could talk with me. I was very busy, hesitated, then said, "Yes." He told me his troubles, tearfully. His wife had left him, his partner had stolen from him. I tried to encourage him, urged him to turn his problems over to God, and told him I would pray for him. "A few days later I was emptying a waste basketinto a large dumpster in back of my office building. As I leaned over, my glassesfellinto the foul garbage. Gazing down into the dumpster, I was mortified. Suddenly, my little neighbor appeared. I told him of my loss. Instantly, he vaulted into the dumpster, sorted through the garbage, found my glasses andheld them up to me, smiling triumphantly. I thanked him over and over. "'It's nothing,' he said. 'You're my friend.' "The Scripture says we should love one another. Sometimes love requires sudden, unselfish action." II. Pro. 17:17 A REAL FRIEND LOVES A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity. Pro. 17:17 A. One characteristic oftrue human friendship is an undyinglove that unaffected by problems, misunderstandings or harsh words. It is a love that transcends all these things and continues to function as if nothing ever happened. A love like this betweentwo human friends is almostnonexistent! B. Jesus, onthe other hand, displays this kind of love without wavering! Notice His promise in Jeremiah 31:3, "Yea, I have loved thee with an everlasting love." Notice that the term of this love is eternity. There is nothing which man can do that can alter the love of Godfor him. Even though we are undeserving and horribly flawed at our best, He loves us with an unchanging, everlasting love! Ill. Rom. 8:31-39.
  33. C. Jesus is a real Friend because He loves us unconditionally. He places no limits on His great love for man. If you remember nothing from any sermon you ever hear in this church, remember this, "Godloves you!" ( Robert Ingram tells of the time when he and his wife first had the opportunity to go snowskiing. Theywere only going to have two-and-a-half days on the slopes and hoped to spend the whole time learning how to ski. When they arrived at the resort, they decided to call some friends who lived about 150 miles from there. When they told them where they were, the friends said, "Why don't you come and see us? We're only three hours away." Robert knew that if they did that it would take up a whole day of their skiing time, so he rather flippantly said, "No, you're not a six-hour friend." A little while later their friends calledback to say they had hired a babysitter, were packing up the car, and would be there to take us to dinner the next evening. Robert was embarrassedwhenthey closedthe conversationby saying, "You are six- hour friends for us." What he had intended as a joke turned out to be a valuable lesson, however. He learned that friendship has a price. His friends were willing to sacrifice in order to spend time with him. We must have a similar willingness to sacrifice in order to spend time nurturing our relationship with God.) III. Pro. 18:24 A REAL FRIEND IS STEADFAST A man that hath friends must shew himself friendly: and there is a friend that stickethcloserthan a brother. Prov 18:24 A. I suppose there have been times when we have all been betrayed by someone we thought to be our friend. It is never pleasantand the pain never really goes completelyawayfrom our hearts. But, what a joy it is to find a friend that doesn't turn and walk awayfrom us when we have hard times, or when we down. B. Jesus is a steadfastFriend. There will never come a day when He isn't there beside us to keepus, guide us and to comfort us. He is a Friend that sticketh closerthan a brother!
  34. (Ill. A little girl came home after being with a friend and said to her mother, "Janie was very sad, Mommy, because her kitty died. But I helped her feel better." When askedwhatshe had done, she replied, "I cried with her." How wonderful it would be if we as Christians were as perceptive as that 4-year-old child. She realizedthat sharing her friend's sorrow would do more goodthan anything else. Sometimes words, eventhose basedon the Bible, are no substitute for genuine sympathy. When a personsees how much we really care, only then can our comments bring help and encouragement.) (Ill. Jesus knows our hurts and He knows how to comfort us in our trying times - Heb. 4:15-16.) C. Besides being steadfastin comforting us in times of sorrow, Jesus has given us His word that He will forever be with us until our journey has ended. Heb. 13:5; Matt. 28:20. What's more, He has send unto us the Holy Spirit who performs a wonderful comforting ministry in our lives, John 14:16-18. (Ill. The Holy Spirit is "Another Comforter." This is, He is "allon paraklhton"." Simply put, "allon" = Another of the same kind and quality, and "paraklhton" = One who comes alongside of. Jesus is telling the grief strickendisciples not to fear, because He is sending One just like himself to walk alongside them as they journey.) (Ill. Thank God for those friends who will stand by when the going gets tough. Michelle is a 16-year-oldgirl who lives in Michigan. She has cancer, and she was facedwith months of chemotherapy. Without those powerful treatments, she had little hope. Michelle was apprehensive and afraid, but eachtime she went in to getan injection, her best high schoolfriend went with her. "I would lie on my back after those treatments and be emotionally and physically exhausted," she said. "But my friend would hold my hand and softly repeat, 'You're going to make it, Michelle. I know you're going to make it.'" While other kids were out playing ball, going shopping and doing homework, Michelle's friend was doing what friends do best. She was being steadfast!) IV. Mt. 11:19; Lk. 19:7 A REAL FRIEND ACCEPTS
  35. The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners. But wisdom is justified of her children. Matt 11:19 And when they saw it, they all murmured, saying, That he was gone to be guestwith a man that is a sinner. Luke 19:7 A. In these 2 passages,people were concernedthat Jesus, who they perceived to be a holy man, was spending His time hanging out with people of a disreputable character. Thank God for those people who are willing to love you, warts and all. I have always been of the opinion that folk can just take me as I am or they can go on their way. It is a greatthing to find a true friend that loves you just as you are. B. This is one of the greatestaspectsofhaving Jesus for a friend. He loves you just like you are. He doesn't ask you to change before He will love you. He just loves you - Psa. 103:14. C. This truth offers no excuse to the person who wants to live a sinful live. Jesus expects His children to live cleanand do the best they can by His grace. However, when we fail, and we will, He doesn't throw is aside and look for a new friend. He does what a friend should do, He reaches downto us in our time of need and reminds us that He still loves us and that He still cares. D. He loves us in spite of our failures! We never have to earn His love. According to the Scriptures, we are "acceptedin the Beloved", Eph. 1:6. (Ill. This term means that we "fit in." In our selves, we are sinful and dirty. We could never hope to be worthy of coming into the presence ofGod. But in Jesus, we "fit in." We are declared righteous and we are acceptedby God, just as we are! That is an incredible thing!) V. Pro. 27:6 A REAL FRIEND OFFERS CORRECTION Faithful are the wounds of a friend; but the kisses ofan enemy are deceitful. Pro. 27:6
  36. A. Rare is the friend who will come to you face to face to tell you when you have made a mistake. A friend who will come to you in love and will tell you that you are wrong is a friend indeed! It is no friend who will allow you to go on in evil and not sayanything for fear of hurting your feelings. Realfriends will reachout in their love for their friends. B. Jesus is a friend who will correctyou when you are wrong! (Ill. Hebrews 12:6-11) VI. Matt. 26:50 A REAL FRIEND FORGIVES And Jesus saidunto him, Friend, wherefore art thou come? Thencame they, and laid hands on Jesus, and took him. Matt 26:50 A. In any friendship, it is inevitable that there will be times when feelings will be hurt. Blessedis that friend who has the power for forgive and to forget. When old wounds are allowedto lie open and fester, then disease is always the result. A genuine friend may be hurt and offended, but he will quickly put it behind him in favor of peace and unity. By the way, anyone who refuses to forgive is no friend, but is an enemy for they will, by their hateful spirit, destroy both themselves and you. B. Thank God, Jesus is a friend who forgives!How many times have we crossedthe line and gone where God has forbidden us? How many times have we, like the Prodigal, smelling of the world, dirty with the filth of sin, turned back to Jesus and with a repentant heart told Him how wrong we were? When we did, we did not find an enemy. Instead, we found a Friend. We found One who loved us in spite of our wanderings and One who was ready to stand up in our behalf and plead our case before the bar of Heaven. Thank God! Jesus is a Friend who forgives - 1 John 1:7-2:1. C. Let no saint fear to return home. When He does, he find a forgiving Friend in the Personof the Lord Jesus Christ! (Ill. One of the all-time greats in baseballwas Babe Ruth. His bat had the powerof a cannon, and his record of 714 home runs remained until Hank
  37. Aaron came along. The Babe was the idol of sports fans, but in time age took its toll, and his popularity beganto wane. Finally the Yankees traded him to the Braves. In one of his lastgames in Cincinnati, Babe Ruth beganto falter. He struck out and made severalmisplays that allowedthe Reds to score five runs in one inning. As the Babe walkedtoward the dugout, chin down and dejected, there rose from the stands an enormous storm of boos and catcalls. Some fans actually shook their fists. Then a wonderful thing happened. A little boy jumped over the railing, and with tears streaming down his cheeks he ran out to the great athlete. Unashamedly, he flung his arms around the Babe's legs and held on tightly. Babe Ruth scoopedhim up, hugged him, and sethim down again. Patting him gently on the head, he took his hand and the two of them walkedoff the field together.Suchunreservedloyalty is what true friendship is all about. We have such a friend in the person of Jesus Christ. ) VII. John 15:15 A REAL FRIEND IS OPEN Henceforth I call you not servants;for the servant knowethnot what his lord doeth: but I have calledyou friends; for all things that I have heard of my Father I have made knownunto you. John 15:15 A. There are few friends with which you can share your deepestsecrets without fear of them being spread around like leaves from an autumn tree. It is a blessing, however, when you find that friend with whom you canbe open and honest. B. Jesus is such a Friend! You can tell Him any thing and He will never betray your confidence - 1 Pet. 5:7. You can lay any burden off onto His shoulders without fear that He will mock you or run to tell another - Matt.. 11:28. C. His Friendship is a 2 way street. Just as longs for you to confide in Him, He is willing to share His truths with you. He has a will for your life and He will lead you into that truth when you are willing to walk with him as with a friend, John 13:16. Can you honestly saythat you have an open relationship with the Lord Jesus?
  38. Conc:Robert Louis Stevenson's tells a story of two sisters in Edinburgh. These sisters lived comfortably in a rather large one-roomapartment. But one day they had a sharp disagreement. As time passed, their angergrew, and they stopped speaking to eachother. Instead of resolving their dispute or one of them moving out, they both stubbornly remained in the apartment-- all the while refusing to communicate. Stevensonwrote, "A chalk line drawn upon the floor separated their two domains; it bisectedthe doorwayand the fireplace, so that each could go out and in and do her cooking without violating the territory of the other. So, for years, they coexistedin a hateful silence." How foolish! It is a sad thing when we draw off areas of our lives and will not allow Jesus to enter those areas. He longs to be our friend and if we will lowerour defenses and let him enter, He will do just that and will come in unto us and will be the best Friend we have ever had. Yes, Jesus is the sinner's Friend. But, to what extent that is true in your life is up to you. I invite you, this evening, to come before the Lord and seek to be His Friend, He is alreadyyours. JOHN MACARTHUR Treating Christ with Criticism and Indifference Sermons Matthew 11:16–24 2287 Sep20, 1981 Play Audio Add to Playlist A + A - Reset
  39. Matthew 11 is our study this morning, and I have been blessedthis week in preparation of my heart and mind to share with you from this text. There’s so much here, and such a clear, concise, and important message,that I’ve asked the Lord repeatedlyin my prayers to use it in a specialway to penetrate hearts. Matthew 11, and we’re looking today at verses 16 through 24, and we’re going to take that as a unit. It includes, really, two features, or two elements, and yet they tie togetherso well that I want to take them as a unit. Our Lord expectedpeople to respond to His message, andto properly respond, and so, one of the things that our Lord commonly saidappears in verse 15 of this chapter. He said, “He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.” We find that in severalother places in the gospelof Matthew. We also find our Lord saying that even from heavenin Revelationchapters 2 and 3, when in the letters to the churches, He repeatedly says, “He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.” In other words, the Lord wants men to properly listen to what He says. The revelationof Godis given with a response in mind; the proper response. And if you remember our last lessonon John the Baptist, you’ll remember that the Lord is calling on the people not only to listen to Him, but to John as well. And if they will listen to John, they will listen to Him, for John speaks of Him. If they had receivedJohn, the forerunner, they would then have received the one of whom John spoke, and if they had receivedthe one of whom John spoke, they would have receivedin their hearts the Kingdom, and if the nation had receivedHim, they would have receivedthe earthly Kingdom as well. And so, our Lord has called for them to hear, but while calling, He recognizes that most do not hear; they do not listen. It is basic to biblical truth that men must respond, that men must react, that men are given a choice when confronted with the truth of God; to hear it, to believe it, to acton it, or to rejectit. Now, by the time we come to chapter 11 of Matthew, we have had ten chapters of the message, tenchapters of the revelation of Jesus Christ. And now, in chapters 11 and 12, Matthew records for us the various kind of responses to Christ.
  40. Now, we’ve already seenthat one of the responses is honestdoubt, and honest doubt was really that response that characterizedJohn the Baptist. He believed, and yet he had some doubt, and so, the Lord dealt with that in the first fifteen verses;and now, He’s going to go on to some other responses to Christ that are much more serious. Honestdoubt canoccur even in the case of a believer, as it did with John. But He’s going to go on to talk about rejection, a superficial kind of amazement and fascination. He’s going to talk about blasphemy in chapter 12. But in our sectiontoday, He’s going to speak of two other responses to Christ that are very common; the first is criticism, and the secondis indifference. One talks about what men do, and one talks about what men don’t do, and a man or a woman can be damned to hell just as much by what they do not do as by what they do. When you look aheadto the ultimate greatwhite throne judgment, it is certain that some people are going to sayas a defense, “Inever did anything.” And that will be their condemnation: they never did anything. Now, at the end of chapter 11, and the end of chapter12, mingled in with these negative responses, are two positive sections, in which the Lord calls for the right response. And so, in a realsense, this is a very critical sectionof Matthew’s gospel. Tenchapters of presentationof who Christ is, now calling for the right response;very essential. Verse 15 really, then, is a callto believe. It’s a callto hear with faith. But this generation, the generationof our Lord’s time, would not hear. And so, He poses a question in verse 16: “But whereunto shall I liken this generation?” “Icallfor this generationto hear, but they do not hear.” The majority of them were not interested in listening to Jesus Christ, though His miracles were, beyond question, convincing that He was from God. “What will I liken them to?” He says. And then He launches in, really, to these two chapters, describing all of the negative ways in which His generation responded to Him. The first one He talks about is criticism. One of the things that characterizedthem was they were just critical; no matter what He did or what He said, they criticized it. There was no validity in the criticism; they were just looking for something to pick on, and there are
  41. people like that today. No matter what the messageis, no matter what is said or what is done, by the church or those who represent Christ, they will always criticize it, because they’re not seeking truth. They’re not open to truth. They will not acknowledgetheir sin. They are not interested in a Savior, and so they just sit back and criticize. Now, back to that phrase that begins verse 16 for a moment: “Whereunto shall I liken this generation?” Thatphrase is a very interesting phrase. That question is a very interesting question, for in Jewishliterature - in the Midrash, which is the, sortof the compilation of Jewishtraditional teaching - that is the most common formula for introducing a parable. Now, all good teachers know that you have to teachin word pictures, or in analogies,or similes, or metaphors, or figures of speech, to make people understand things. And that was true with the rabbis as well, and so they would commonly say this phrase, “To what is the matter like?” and that is the most common phrase in Rabbinic teaching for introducing a parable. Or, “How can I liken this point to something in life that will make it clearto you? What is it like?” And Jesus is, then, in a very traditional rabbinic way, launching Himself into a parable. “Whereunto shall I liken this generation?”“How canI illustrate what this generationis like?” And then He begins. “It is like children sitting in the market places, and calling unto their fellows, and saying, ‘We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced; we have mourned unto you, and ye have not lamented.’” Now, stop there. That’s very interesting. At first reading, you probably don’t want to - don’t understand what it’s saying. Let me help you a little. In the centerof every town and village was a place calledthe agora in Greek, and the agora means marketplace, andon the market days, the people would come in. And they would fill up that open space in the middle of town, with all of their carts, and their little lean-to stores, and all of their wares, andthey would sell everything in the marketplace. And it was a favorite place for the children to play, when they had free hours or when their parents were milling around in the marketplace, andchildren would inevitably be scurrying through the
  42. marketplace. And, of course, they knew eachother, and so, eventually they would all come together, and games would begin to take shape. Now, this would be very much like a public park, or a town square, and in fact, on the days when the market wasn’tthere, it was a greatwide-open space, and there would even be more room for the children to play. And children commonly, as children today, then would play the games that sort of mimicked the life of their elders. They would copy what their parents did. And one of the popular games they played was wedding, and another favorite was funeral - a little harder to imagine - but they liked to play wedding and funeral. You say, “Why?” Well, because those were public socialevents. Whenevera wedding occurred, there was always a parade through town, a great processional. The bride, the bridegroom, the friend of the bridegroom, and all of the ladies who were waiting on the bride, and everybody else in the wedding, they would come through town. And there would come folks along playing pipes and flutes, and people would be skipping and hopping and dancing with joy, as they went through the town in this procession. And so, the children would always see this, and they would know it was a part of life. Very likely they would get together, and somebody, that very fortunate little girl, would getto be the bride, and perhaps she would dress herself a little bit fancy, and she would take the role of the bride. And some little fellow would get to be the bridegroom, and somebodyelse the friend of the bridegroom, and some of the ladies who would be attending the bride, and they would get the whole game going. And they would be going through town, and somebody who could blow a whistle or play a little flute would be playing, and they would be calling to their friends, and say, “Come on and join the procession.” And then, after they played wedding a little while, they decided to play funeral - which is just as inevitable as wedding - and it was also public. Forwhenever there was a funeral, they would lift up the body, and carry the body through the city, and all the people involved with the family would come along.
  43. And they would hire certain Jewishwomenwho were paid wailers, and they would come in and wail, and moan, and lament, and the kids would see this. And so, after they played wedding a while, they got tired of that, and they decided to play funeral. And so, they would wail, and scream, and they would beat on themselves. The term that is used means to strike yourselves, and it was very common in funeral processions that the people would beat on their chest, and they’d beat on their heads, and hit themselves all over their bodies. And so, the little kids would just pick this up. They’d maybe put on some black clothes, and they’d pound on themselves, and as they were playing funeral, they would cry to their little friends, and say, “Come on, and play funeral with us.” But do you know what? There were some kids that didn’t want to play. And that’s why verse 17 says, “We piped, and you didn’t dance; and we mourned unto you, and you didn’t strike yourselves.” I mean, there were a bunch of kids in the parable that were just spoilsports, bad sport. “We don’t want to play your dumb game.” “So, we’llchange our game. You don’t like wedding, we’ll play funeral” - that’s the opposite extreme. “We don’t want to play that, either. We don’t want to be involved at all.” Peevish children. The sadgame, you see, is opposite the glad game, but they aren’t going to play either game;they just stubbornly don’t want to play. They just want to kind of sit on the sidelines and criticize - the sheerperversity of human nature. Now, the principle of the parable is very clear. There are some people who just don’t want to play, no matter what the game is, right? No matter how you approachthem, they don’t want to play. They’ll criticize the wedding, and they’ll criticize the funeral. Nothing satisfies them. They will always find fault, because they are basically unwilling to participate, unwilling to be satisfied. Now, Jesus says,“Thatis like this generation. You just don’t want to play. No matter what the game is, you will not be satisfied. “You’re like the children who, when calledby their little friends, had no openness, and no interest, just a bitter, critical, contrary spirit.” Now, look at verse 18, and here comes the application: “ForJohn came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He hath a demon.’” Now, what is that? John came in a funeral mode. John came austere. Johncame dressedin a camel’s hair
  44. cloak, whichwould have been black. John came eating locusts and wild honey, having no normal socialrelationships. He lived in the desert. By all human definitions, he was a recluse and a hermit. He came pounding awaythe messageofjudgment and fiery condemnation. He talked about an axe chopping at the root of the tree. He cried out for repentance, and the demonstration of the fruit of repentance - Matthew 3. I mean, he came in a funeral mode. He came serious and austere. He lived apart from the normal relationships of life. He never enteredinto socialactivities at all. He was a voice crying in the wilderness. And you know what they said of him? “He has a demon. He is possessed. Imean, anybody who acts that weird is possessed.” It’s interesting, isn’t it, that at