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components of EHR ppt.pptx

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components of EHR ppt.pptx

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An electronic health record is the systematized collection of patient and population electronically stored health information in a digital format. These records can be shared across different health care settings.

An electronic health record is the systematized collection of patient and population electronically stored health information in a digital format. These records can be shared across different health care settings.

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components of EHR ppt.pptx

  1. 1. UNIT-IV COMPONENTS OF EHR Dr.Anjalatchi Muthukumaran Vice principal ,ECON
  2. 2. ELECTRONICHEALTHRECOR D(EHR) • Electronic health record, is the electronic version of the client data found in the traditional paper record. • EHRs are defined as “a longitudinal electronic record of patient health information generated by one or more encounters in any care delivery setting.
  3. 3. EHR sample record
  4. 4. Records system started in EHRs developed between 1971 and 1992 were developed with hierarchical or relational databases, around or added to hospital billing and scheduling systems while others such as COSTAR, PROMIS, TMR, and HELP were developed as clinical systems to help improve medical care and for use in medical research
  5. 5. Who is created EHR first ?  In the 1960s, Larry Weed, an American physician, researcher, educator, and entrepreneur, developed the Problem Oriented Medical Record. With this, Weed introduced the idea of electronically recording and maintaining patient data. Weed may be identified as the person who invented electronic health records themselves.
  6. 6. Trends in EHR
  7. 7. Charateristic
  8. 8. Time line for EHR history  The 1960s: Problem-Oriented Medical Records  (POMR). Developed by Dr. Lawrence Weed in 1968, POMR is still used by some medical and behavioral health providers today.  The 1970s: The Dawn of the EHR System  In 1972, the world was introduced to the very first iteration of what we now know as an EHR. The Regenstrief Institute in Indianapolis enlisted the help of Clement McDonald to develop its EHR program.
  9. 9. Continued  The 1990s: The Internet’s Effects on EHR  By the early 1990s, the majority of U.S. industries had already taken the plunge into automating data and transactions. Health care, on the other hand, was struggling to keep up. In 1991, a book titled “The Computer-Based Patient Record: An Essential Technology for Health Care”
  10. 10. Continued  The 2000s: EHR Standardization and Adaptation  The EHRs of the ’90s would likely be unrecognizable to today’s user base. Before the requirements of HIPAA, EHR capabilities didn’t have to conform to any standards.
  11. 11. EHR Today  Over the course of five years, EHRs became nearly ubiquitous in medicine as well as behavioral health settings. In 2015, the adoption rate for hospital clinics reached 92 percent. Independent clinics, usually due to financial restrictions, were somewhat behind with an adoption rate of nearly 80 percent.
  12. 12. EHR evolution 2021
  13. 13. The Future of EHR  The history of electronic health records is still being written. EHRs have come a long way since the development of problem-oriented medical records, and there’s no sign of that innovation stopping any time soon. For behavioral health providers, two particular trends stand out for the future evolution of EHR.
  14. 14. Some of the other ways EHRs are continuing to evolve include:  Improved accessibility:  Optimized workflows  Integrated tele health visits  Ongoing automation
  15. 15. Roles of EHR  • Represents patient’s health history  • Medium of Communication among health care practitioners  • Legal document for health care  • Source for clinical outcomes and health services research  • Resource for practitioner education  • Alerts, reminders, quality improvement
  16. 16. Components of EHR
  17. 17. Data Components of EHR
  18. 18. Continued
  19. 19. Clinical Decision support System
  20. 20. CLINICAL DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (CDSS)  • A CDS system is a software that assists the provider in making decisions with regard to patient care.  • CDSS provides physicians and nurses with real-time diagnostic and treatment recommendations.
  21. 21. Function of CDSS
  22. 22. What are 5 benefits of EHR?  With EHRs, information is available whenever and wherever it is needed.  Improved Patient Care.  Increase Patient Participation.  Improved Care Coordination.  Improved Diagnostics & Patient Outcomes.  Practice Efficiencies and Cost Savings.
  23. 23. Patient Safety With EHR  Patient safety with EHR Researchers found that computerized physician reminders increased the use of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations from practically 0% to 35% and 50%, respectively, for hospitalized patients. 
  24. 24. Prevention of complication  Prevention of complication with EHR Willson et al, found a significant association between computerized reminders and pressure ulcer prevention in hospitalized patients. They found a 5% decrease in the development of pressure ulcers 6 months after the implementation of computerized reminders that targeted hospital nurses.
  25. 25. Continued
  26. 26. Best uses of practice with EHR • Rossi and Every, found that computerized reminders as part of a CDSS have been linked to an 11.3% increase in appropriate hypertension treatment in a primary care setting.
  27. 27. Decreased cost of care with EHR •Tierney et al found a 14.3% decrease in the number of diagnostic tests ordered per visit and a 12.9% decrease in diagnostic test costs per visit when using an EHR with CDS and CPOE components.
  28. 28. Computerized physician order entry(CPOE)  Computerized physician order entry(CPOE)  • CPOE is a software that allow physicians to enter orders directly into the computer rather than doing so on paper.  Example  • drugs,  • laboratory tests,  • radiology,  • physical therapy
  29. 29. Benefits of CPOE • Eliminates potentially dangerous medical errors caused by poor penmanship of physicians. • Eliminate errors caused by unclear telephone orders • It also makes the ordering process more efficient because nursing and pharmacy staffs do not need to seek clarification or to solicit missing information from illegible or incomplete orders. • Enhances patient safety
  30. 30. Evidence base practice  Evidence Studies suggest that serious medication errors can be reduced by 55% when a CPOE system is used alone, and by 83% when coupled with a CDS system that creates alerts based on what the physician orders.  • Using a CPOE system, especially when it is linked to a CDS, can result in improved efficiency and effectiveness of care.
  31. 31. Health Information Exchange (HIE)
  32. 32. Health information exchange (HIE)
  33. 33. HIE Benefit
  34. 34. Technologies involved In EHR
  35. 35. PICS
  36. 36. Meaning of PICS
  37. 37. Bar Coding System
  38. 38. Continued
  39. 39. RFI-Radio frequency Identification
  40. 40. Meaning of RFI
  41. 41. ADM-Automated Dispencing Medicines
  42. 42. Automated dispensing medicine
  43. 43. Benefits ADM
  44. 44. Electronic Medication Administration records (EMAR)
  45. 45. Meaning EMAR
  46. 46. Benefits of EHR
  47. 47. Benefits of block chain EHR
  48. 48. Benefit Outcomes
  49. 49. Draw backs including • adoption and implementation costs, • ongoing maintenance costs, and • loss of revenue associated with temporary loss of productivity.
  50. 50. Barrier adoption Research abstract
  51. 51. continued
  52. 52. Continued
  53. 53. Advantages and Disadvantage of EHR
  54. 54. Current problems with EHR
  55. 55. Issue with EHR
  56. 56. Summary
  57. 57. Conclusion •EHR adoption must be considered one of main approaches that diversify our focus on quality improvement and cost reduction. •Over time, providers and researchers will be eager to quantify the returns that are expected from these investments.
  58. 58. Summary
  59. 59. References • IOM. Crossing the quality chasm: a new health system for the 21st century. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine; 2001. [PubMed] • Dexter PR, Perkins S, Overhage JM, et al. A computerized reminder system to increase the use of preventive care for hospitalized patients. N Engl J Med. 2001;345(13):965–970. [PubMed] • Willson D, Ashton C, Wingate N, et al. Computerized support of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment protocols. Proc Annu Symp Comput Appl Med Care. 1995:646–650. [PMC free article][PubMed] • Rossi RA, Every NR. A computerized intervention to decrease the use of calcium channel blockers in hypertension. J Gen Intern Med. 1997;12(11):672–678. [PMC free article] [PubMed] • Tierney WM, Miller ME, McDonald CJ. The effect on test ordering of informing physicians of the charges for outpatient diagnostic tests. N Engl J Med. 1990;322(21):1499–1504.
  60. 60. Continued  • Bates DW, Leape LL, Cullen DJ, et al. Effect of computerized physician order entry and a team intervention on prevention of serious medication errors. JAMA. 1998;280(15):1311– 1316. [PubMed]  • Bates DW, Teich JM, Lee J, et al. The impact of computerized physician order entry on medication error prevention. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 1999;6(4):313–321. [PMC free article] [PubMed]  • The National Alliance for Health Information Technology. Report to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology on Defining Key Health Information Technology Terms. [Accessed April 18, 2011].http://healthit.hhs.gov/portal/server.pt/community/healthit_ hhs_gov__reports/1239.  • Walker J, Pan E, Johnston D, et al. The value of health care information exchange and interoperability. Health Aff (Millwood) 2005;Suppl:W5-10–15-18. [PubMed]

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