Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.

Research and Science of Story Bridge

165 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

This powerpoint highlights data and findings from research and evaluation about the Story Bridge process. To learn more about Story Bridge, please visit: www.storybridge.space

  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

Research and Science of Story Bridge

  1. 1. STORY BRIDGE Pathway to Change Performance of Humanity Dr. Qinghong Wei, Executive Director & Co-Artistic Director www.storybridge.space
  2. 2. FRAMEWORK AGENCY SOCIAL FINAN- CIAL EDUCA- TIONAL INFORMA -TIONAL PSYCHO- LOGICAL Empowerment Framework. Source: Alsop et al, 2006.
  3. 3. STORY BRIDGE & EMPOWERMENT A DISSERTATION RESEARCH FROM FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Colquitt Camilla Mount Dora Minneola Source: Wei, 2014.
  4. 4. STORY BRIDGE & EMPOWERMENT Source: Wei, 2014. This multiple-case study compared Colquitt, GA, a community that has practiced Story Bridge since 1992, with three other communities. The research has found that:  Respondents of Colquitt,, show the highest levels of individual agency in 3 assets out of 4 - organizational, psychological, and educational and skills assets.  They also exhibit the highest degrees of empowerment in 2 of the 3 domains – state/political and society/community.
  5. 5. Figure 4.14 Word Clouds of responses to the question ‘what things you would most like to change?’ Source: Wei, 2014. STORY BRIDGE & EMPOWERMENT
  6. 6. Figure 4.16 Word Clouds of responses to the question ‘what is the one thing you would most like to do in your life?’ Source: Wei, 2014 STORY BRIDGE & EMPOWERMENT
  7. 7. Figure 4.22 Interests in Election 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120% Colquitt Camilla Mt Dora Minneola Interest in Election Not interested Slightly interested Fairly interested Very interested STORY BRIDGE & EMPOWERMENT Source: Wei, 2014.
  8. 8. Figure 4.31 Involvement in community decision-making 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120% Colquitt Camilla Mt Dora Minneola Involvement in Community Decision-Making Not involved at all Slightly involved Fairly involved Very involved STORY BRIDGE & EMPOWERMENT Source: Wei, 2014.
  9. 9. EVALUATION RESULTS STORY BRIDGE PROJECT WITH MIGRANT WORKERS IN BEIJING, CHINA Changes in levels of individual skills in the Beijing project. Source: pARTicipate, 2016 3.57 3.24 3.48 3.43 2.95 3.00 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 领导力 管理能力 交流沟通的能力 解决冲突的能力 营销推广的能力 创造力 参加故事桥后技能水平的变化(自述) 项目结束 项目开始 Creativity Marketing Conflict Resolution Communication Management Leadership
  10. 10. Source: pARTicipate, 2016 The evaluation results found that after participating in the 9-month Story Bridge program, there was:  20% increase in individual ability for conflict resolution  30% increase in self-confidence, and  41% increase in community engagement among participants.. EVALUATION RESULTS STORY BRIDGE PROJECT WITH MIGRANT WORKERS IN BEIJING, CHINA
  11. 11. EVALUATION RESULTS HARMONY IN THE HILLS Source: Community Performance International, 2017 A youth-driven, intergenerational Story Bridge program funded by U.S. Department of Justice Clay County, KY 2017
  12. 12. EVALUATION RESULTS HARMONY IN THE HILLS Source: Community Performance International, 2017
  13. 13. EVALUATION RESULTS HARMONY IN THE HILLS To view the complete infographic: https://create.piktochart.com/output/23486058-harmony-in-the-hills-2017
  14. 14. Diversity => Inter- generativity Generative Social Space Challenges => Capacity Authentic Expression => Validation EVIDENCE- BASED EMPOWERMENT PATHWAYS OF STORY BRIDGE
  15. 15. Authenticity Stories from the heart Freedom to express True stories Diversity Diversity adds energy Diversity enhances teamwork Everyone brings something important Age diversity EMPOWERMENT PATHWAYS IDENTIFIED BY PARTICIPANTS AT SUMMIT OF COMMUNITY-BASED DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM, CENTER FOR APPALACHIAN PHILANTHROPY, IN LEXINGTON, KY, MAY 2015 Challenges People rise to the challenge Willingness to get outside your comfort zone Safety to be creative Acceptance of change Social Space Establish relationships as we tell stories Empathy, compassion and love for each other New friendships by networking and working together No judgment Take the risk to speak one’s truth Discover unity in diversity Acceptance of varied ideas when we shared Respect of others’ views/beliefs when they differed from ours Positive comments Trust in group Coming together as one Source: Community Performance International, 2015
  16. 16. Diversity => Inter- generativity Generative Social Space Challenges => Capacity Expression => Validation Story Bridge Psycho- logical Social FinancialEducation Infor- mational STORY BRIDGE
  17. 17. INFORMAL ECONOMY HAMIN LIU • Communities work because of the Generative Social Space – AWUG effect: Activities with Unrelated Generative effect – Intentional effort to heal and strengthen relationships – Festivals: cultural and relationship renewal • When the Generative Social Space is – Present and vibrant: self- sustaining growth – Weak and diminished: violence and destruction
  18. 18. NON-THEATRICAL APPLICATION THE INTERNET SCHOOL The first online empowerment and education program for rural China designed with the empowerment pathways. The program connects teachers worldwide with rural schools of China. The pilot was launched in 2013 with one class in a middle school in Gansu. Now the program has benefited thousands of students in multiple provinces, funded by major foundation in China.
  19. 19. NON-THEATRICAL APPLICATION: THE INTERNET SCHOOL
  20. 20. NON-THEATRICAL APPLICATION: THE INTERNET SCHOOL 19% 7% 81% 90% 0% 3% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Non-IS Students IS Students Very difficult Somewhat difficult Quite easy Figure 3. Perceived level of difficulty of achieving life goals, self-reported by students. Source: Overseas China Education Foundation, 2014.
  21. 21. REFERENCES • Alsop, R., Bertelsen, M.F., and Holland J. (2006). Empowerment in Practice: From Analysis to Implementation. The World Bank. • Community Performance International. (2015) Results Report for the Vulnerable Population Program, May Summit. Center for Appalachian Philanthropy. • Liu, H. (2011) In Search of the Informal Capital in Community. The Fetzer Institute. • Liu, H. (2010) . Strengthening Local Leaders and Self-Organizing Structures in Vulnerable Communities. Center on Community Philanthropy, Clinton School of Public Service, University of Arkansas. • Overseas China Education Foundation. (2014) Annual Evaluation Report for the Internet School. Chen Family Foundation. • pARTicipate. (2016) Evaluation Report for the Story Bridge program I in Beijing, China. Vibrant Communities. • Wei, Q. (2014). Creativity-based Empowerment and Development: A Multiple-Case Study to Investigate Alternative Development Strategies in Small Towns. Florida State University. CONTACT Dr. Qinghong Wei community@storybridge.space www.storybridge.space

×