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A chinese approach to management

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chinese management
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A chinese approach to management

  1. 1. Presented by: Ceezee Yasmin S.Kanwal Noreen Chahrazad
  2. 2.  Introduction  China’s Unique Management Practices  Structuring Organizations Simply  Examples  Wanxiang’s Key Success Factor  Sany’s Key Success Factor  Localizing Value Propositions  Developing Products Quickly  Difference Between Chinese Style And Western Style  Conclusion
  3. 3. What is Management? Management is the process of reaching organizational goals by working with and through people and other organizational resources. Management in China I. State owned enterprise – Experiment with western management practices II. Private owned companies – New management practices
  4. 4.  Creation of their own ecosystem In this perspective, business leaders needs to build everything. e.g. Hai Di Lao’s Key Success Factor  Adept in Management  Leaders have to be as proficient at managing the state as they are at managing operations.
  5. 5. Trading Mentality  High Asset Turn-Over  Good Timing over Perfection Organization Structure  Everyone reports at the top
  6. 6.  China’s business leaders decentralise which helps them respond to market shifts and rapidly add new business lines chinese companies create structures that give business unit nearly total autnomy -Exemple:
  7. 7.  An organizational flat structure with few or no levels of middle management between staff and executives. It allows as many direc reports as possible Example :
  8. 8. Brands wanxiang Sany Media Whirlpoo l Hotpot restaura nt Tencent QQ
  9. 9.  Automotive Part  Bicycle parts from scrap material  Manufacturing components for Detroit’s Big Three:  Now, buying and turning around the factories of U.S. automotive component makers.
  10. 10. Key Factors: Brought Cheaper Parts from Chinese Factories: • Feed the higher-value machining • Finish processes in United States. Invested Other Companies : • Sources • Provides lean management coaching Built Stronger Relationships • American managers • Employees
  11. 11.  Company operate in two time frames: Executing today’s business • Adding resources • Separate Manager • Autonomy • Responsible Expansion of Business • Incubating new business models • launching new brands. • Separate Manager • Autonomy • Responsible
  12. 12.  Sany’s major product lines: ◦ Ready-mix cement trucks ◦ Excavators  Sold to local leasing companies ◦ Rent to local contractors on a job-by-job basis ◦ Strong network connection ◦ Well connected  Compete on their preferential access  keep capital commitments down. PTA is a trading bloc that gives preferential access to certain products from the participating countries.
  13. 13.  Founder: Zhang Yong  Fast growing hot pot restaurant Key Factor: Spot Recruit Retain Store Managers by age of 21
  14. 14.  To test trainees: ◦ Assign high responsibility tasks ◦ Negotiating ◦ Takeover a rival chain  Coaching  Feedback  Training  Retening Incentives to Manager • Trips outside China • Housing • Education for their children Creates his own suppliers (Strengthen Bench Mark ) • By offering wannabe entrepreneurs • Promise lots of future business
  15. 15. Pulls Capital Sources • Local governments (financial incentives and subsidies) • Chinese Communist Party angels • Provincial investment funds • Friends of friends Strong personal relationships • Show capability to help bureaucrats meeting their goals. • Increase their credit ratings
  16. 16.  Launched in Shenzhen in 1998  Free instant-messaging service named QQ  Tencent, China’s leading internet service portal  Gain an advantage by quickly rolling out new offerings  Tencent now has over700 million users  Less Innovating more imitating
  17. 17.  Rate of adding more features Features Games Search engine Ecommerce marketplace Music Micro blogs Virtual currency Q- coins
  18. 18.  China is still developing ◦ inexperienced customers ◦ undercapitalized companies ◦ Silent brands ◦ unique local business customs ◦ Local traditions Value Proposition Statement convinces a potential consumer that one particular product or service will add more value or better solve a problem than other similar offerings. Localization provides companies a way to capture value
  19. 19.  The way chinese companies develop new products from exixting technologies and ramp u large-scale production is very speed -Examples:KFC; GOOD BABY INTERNATIONAL HOLDINGS
  20. 20. Skilled chinese companies rely on are mainly downstream industrial competencies such as :  Ability to lunch new offedring examples wangxiang; midea;good baby international holdings  Prototypes wiftly to meet buyer’s demand  Adapt designs to use differents materials when the originals were expensive or available  Modify equipement so that they could make differents products  To keep cost down
  21. 21.  Trouble is, entrepreneurial people tend to leave as quickly as they sign on, which is why turnover in China’s private companies is upwards of 20% a year.  most companies have invested little in talent retention and are weak when it comes to coaching  Feedback and training
  22. 22.  The findings of this articale increase our understanding of corporate social responsibility from the consumers perspective in a chinese and western setting :  Based on primary data Chinese companies generally keep engi- neering and manufacturing close, often co- locating them. Multinational firms usually maintain greater organizational distance between the two functions. They Tend to acquire new technologies either through formal licensing deals or by reverse-engineering them, but they keep the physical work of experimentation and production in-house. Multinationals, with their opposite re- source endowments, do the opposite. Chinese companies also hire more midlevel engineering and manufacturing people, even though they’re getting expensive. But for WESTERN COMPANIES’ process is usually design to driven by the desire to save production steps and labor hours, however the added en- gineering and manufacturing bandwidth gives the Chinese the luxury of tinkering, which can solve difficult problems. As an example when Apple had to re-design the screen of its first iPhone at the last minute, its Shenzhen supplier roused its engineers out of bed, developed a bet- ter screen, and overhauled the production line—in just four days’ time.
  23. 23.  In summary, we were able to explore the uniqueness of Chinese corporate governance practices with regard to ownership and temporal variables. In addition, we were able to demonstrate the mediation effect of firm size on the relationship between executive age and firm performance. Our results suggest that while younger firms are more successful in China, the state is still the dominant player and will likely be so for some time.  Unlike the west, private and institutional ownership do not make that much of a difference in terms of firm performance. In addition, duality and board size are not determining factors while board vigilance has minimal impact. On the other hand, international ownership is as important as state ownership and larger companies enjoy the benefits of hiring executives imbued with guanxi. In closing, as global business practices are still relatively diverse, both researchers and practitioners should be alert to differences in governance practices across different societies.

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Lean management is an approach to running an organization that supports the concept of continuous improvement, a long-term approach to work that systematically seeks to achieve small, incremental changes in processes in order to improve efficiency and quality
  • Developed countries are sold to contractors and expected to last decades.
    Dnt compete on basis of durability, financial commit ant , reliability.

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