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A STUDY ON THE WELFARE MEASURES PROVIDED IN THE COMPANY WITH REGARDS TO JOB SATISFACTION IN TVS COMPANY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE AT MADURAI

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“A STUDY ON THE WELFARE MEASURES PROVIDED IN THE
COMPANY WITH REGARDS TO JOB SATISFACTION IN TVS
COMPANY WITH SPECIAL REFE...
CHAPTER I
Introduction
2
ABSTRACT
Employee welfare policies are one of the important features in the
growth of the company. The welfare measures & ...
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A STUDY ON THE WELFARE MEASURES PROVIDED IN THE COMPANY WITH REGARDS TO JOB SATISFACTION IN TVS COMPANY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE AT MADURAI

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This study deals with the detailed analysis of the welfare measures provided in the company and the measures which can be introduced for the betterment of employees with special reference to TVS company at Madurai.

This study deals with the detailed analysis of the welfare measures provided in the company and the measures which can be introduced for the betterment of employees with special reference to TVS company at Madurai.

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A STUDY ON THE WELFARE MEASURES PROVIDED IN THE COMPANY WITH REGARDS TO JOB SATISFACTION IN TVS COMPANY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE AT MADURAI

  1. 1. “A STUDY ON THE WELFARE MEASURES PROVIDED IN THE COMPANY WITH REGARDS TO JOB SATISFACTION IN TVS COMPANY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE AT MADURAI” A project report submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the award of the degree of POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Submitted by ANTHONY JUDE ASHOK RAJ Reg. No: 17GIB13370001 1
  2. 2. CHAPTER I Introduction 2
  3. 3. ABSTRACT Employee welfare policies are one of the important features in the growth of the company. The welfare measures & policies are designed to attract, motivate and retain good employee. Companies offering more voluntary benefits have better chance of attracting qualified people and retaining them. Job satisfaction is a multifaceted concept. It is an integral component of an organisational climate and it is an important element in the management of employee relationship. Therefore the research objective is to study the job satisfaction based on the welfare measures provided in TVS company. Introduction: This study is all about the employee’s welfare measures given by the company to satisfy the employees, through which the satisfaction level of the employees is measured. Welfare measures are the basic facilities provided to the employees in a company. Job satisfaction level is measured with the means of employee’s welfare measures provided in a company. I`ll be focusing mainly on TVS company in Madurai for my research. TVS motor company: It is a multinational motorcycle company headquartered at Chennai, India. It is the third largest motorcycle company in India with a revenue of over 13,000 Cr ($2 billion) in 2016- 17. The company has an annual sales of 3 million units and an annual capacity of over 4 million vehicles. TVS Motor Company is also the 2nd largest exporter in India with exports to over 60 Countries. TVS Motor Company Ltd (TVS Motor), member of the TVS Group, is the largest company of the group in terms of size and turnover. 3
  4. 4. History: Early History - Sundaram Clayton was founded in 1962 in collaboration with Clayton Dewandre Holdings, United Kingdom. It manufactured brakes, exhausts, compressors and various other automotive parts. The company set up a plant at Hosur in 1978, to manufacture mopeds as part of their new division. In 1980, TVS 50, India's first two-seater moped rolled out of the factory at Hosur in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. A technical collaboration with the Japanese auto giant Suzuki Ltd. resulted in the joint-venture between Sundaram Clayton Ltd and Suzuki Motor Corporation, in 1982. Commercial production of motorcycles began in 1984. TV Sundram Iyengar: TVS was established by Mr TV Sundaram Iyengar. He began with Delhi first bus service in 1911 and founded T.V. Sundaram Iyengar and Sons Limited, a company in the transportation business with a large fleet of trucks and buses under the name of Southern Roadways Limited. When he died in 1955, his sons took the company ahead with several forays in the automobile sector, including finance, insurance, two-wheelers/ three wheelers, tyres and components, housing, aviation, logistics etc. The group has managed to run 97 companies that account for a combined turnover of nearly US$6 billion. Birth and early life - T.V. Sundram Iyengar was born in 1877 in Thirukkurungudi,Tirunelveli in the Madras Presidency, British India. Sundram Iyengar started his initial career as a lawyer, as per his father's wishes, then moved to work for the Indian railways and later in a bank. [2] As an industrialist - Sundram Iyengar later quit his jobs[3] and laid the foundation for the motor transport industry in South India when he first started a bus service in the city of Madurai in the year 1911.[3][4] He established the T.V. Sundram Iyengar and Sons Limited in 1911, which by his death in 1955, operated a number of buses and lorries under the title of Southern Roadways Limited.[4] This paved the way for the genesis of the TVS Group. During the times of the second world war, Madras Presidency was met with petrol scarcity, to meet the demands, Sundram Iyengar designed and produced the TVS Gas Plant. He also started a factory for rubber retreading, besides two more concerns, the Madras Auto Service Ltd and the Sundaram Motors, a division of T V Sundram Iyengar & Sons Ltd., the former was the largest distributors of General Motors in the 1950s.[4] What started as a single man's passion soon became the business of a family. 4
  5. 5. Sundram Iyengar had five sons and three daughters, and in his patriarchal Tamil Brahmin family all male members got into the business. With his son, T.S. Duraisamy's early death, four other sons— T.S. Rajam, T.S. Santhanam, T.S. Srinivasan and T.S. Krishna – became an integral part of the business and ever since there have been four largely distinct branches that, however, have worked under the TVS umbrella. The group established by Sundram Iyengar, according to the company, is currently the largest automobile distribution company in India, enjoys a turnover of about US$ 7.2 Billion and has an employee strength of over 60,000. The group operates in diverse fields like automotive component manufacturing, automotive dealerships, finance and electronics,[5] as well as into IT solutions and services. TV Sundram Iyengar & Son’s: T V Sundram Iyengar & Sons, established in 1911, is the holding company of the TVS group and is the largest automobile corporate dealer in India. The service focused company provides employment to over 10000 people with revenue of around INR 8000 Crores. It operates through three divisions, viz., TVS, Sundaram Motors and Madras Auto Service. Being the trading and distribution arm of the group, the business activities of TVS & Sons include dealerships for Automobile vehicles, sales & service of products for special applications like Construction & Material handling. The company manages Joint Ventures in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh for automobile distribution, dealership business through its subsidiary company in South Africa and vehicle servicing business in Saudi Arabia. The Dealership Business focuses on sales and distribution of commercial vehicles, utility & sports utility vehicles, passenger cars representing various automobile vehicle manufacturers such as Ashok Leyland, General Motors, Honda, Mahindra & Mahindra, Mahindra Navistar, Mercedes Benz, Renault, Volkswagen and off highway equipment manufactured by Escorts, JLG, Ingersoll Rand and Pal Finger. The company has more than 150 outlets and sells over 60,000 vehicles and service reporting exceeds 600,000 vehicles per annum. TVS & Sons also has two subsidiary companies that include TVS Logistics Services Limited – India’s leading third party logistics service provider and TVS Automobile Solutions Limited – India’s largest after-market service provider for passenger cars, which also operates the brand My TVS. 5
  6. 6. Suzuki Relationship - TVS and Suzuki shared a 19-year-long relationship that was aimed at technology transfer, to enable design and manufacture of two-wheelers specifically for the Indian market. Re-christened TVS-Suzuki, the company brought out several models such as the Suzuki Supra, Suzuki Samurai, Suzuki Shogun and Suzuki Shaolin. In 2001, after separating ways with Suzuki, the company was renamed TVS Motor, relinquishing its rights to use the Suzuki name. There was also a 30-month moratorium period during which Suzuki promised not to enter the Indian market with competing two-wheelers. Recent: Recent launches include the TVS Apache RR 310, the TVS Apache RTR 200, TVS Victor and TVS XL 100. TVS has recently won 4 top awards at J.D. Power Asia Pacific Awards 2016, 3 top awards at J.D. Power Asia Pacific Awards 2015 & Two-Wheeler Manufacturer of the Year at NDTV Car & Bike Awards (2014–15) In early 2015, TVS Racing became the first Indian factory team to take part in the Dakar Rally, the world's longest and most dangerous rally. TVS Racing partnered with French motorcycle manufacturer sherco , and named the team Sherco TVS Rally Factory Team. TVS Racing also won the Raid de Himalaya and the FOX Hill Super Cross held at Sri Lanka. In three decades of its racing history, TVS Racing has won over 90% of the races it participates in. In 2016 TVS started manufacturing the BMW G310R, a model co-developed with BMW Motorrad. On 6 December 2017, TVS launched their most-awaited motorcycle, the Apache RR 310 in an event at Chennai. The 310cc motorcycle with an engine which was co-developed with BMW features first ever full fairing on a TVS bike, dual-channel ABS, EFI, KYB suspension kits, etc. It is expected to rival bikes like KTM RC 390, Kawasaki Ninja 250SL after hitting the market. The Apache RR 310 is designed and realised entirely in India. Welfare measures: The company have to keep the employees attracted to the company and this keeps them happy to the extent possible. Welfare measures are over and above the wages paid to employees. These include improved working conditions, health care facilities, insurance for self and family, recreation facilities, improved industrial relations and so on. These measures may not be in the form of monetary benefits. 6
  7. 7. All these measures are aimed at Keeping the workers happy and satisfied, to provide better employment life and health to workers, reduce stress situations, improve intellectual, cultural and materials conditions, Welfare measures are as follows: Welfare measures are provided mainly by the employers. However government schemes, social set up and charitable agencies may also extent their help all aimed at improving employee health, economic betterment and social status. There are reasonable welfare measures available to employees through statutory provisions in most cases to improve the degree of welfare facilities. The welfare measures are not rigid. It will be changing all the time. It reflects the personality of the Welfare Officer on his vision, creativity and understanding the spirit of his work ethics. The welfare measures may also help develop the personality of employees to certain extent. Motive behind providing welfare schemes is to create efficient, healthy, loyal and satisfied labour force for the organization. The important welfare measures can be detained as follows: Housing schemes, medical benefits, education and recreation facilities for workers’ families help in raising their standards of living. Because the welfare of their families is taken care of workers’ pay more attention towards work increasing their productivity. Employees become loyal to the employer. They will stick on. They start taking active interest in their jobs and work with a feeling of involvement and participation. There are statutory and non-statutory welfare schemes. Under the Factories Act and Rules, Dock worker’s Act, Mines Act etc. there are certain provisions on Welfare. These are to be complied with failing which legal proceedings will be initiated against the employer. Even appointment of Labour Welfare Officer where more than 500 workers are employed is statutory requirement. 7
  8. 8. Statutory Welfare Schemes: The statutory welfare schemes include the following provisions: o Drinking Water o Facilities for sitting o First aid appliances o Latrines and Urinals o Canteen facilities o Spittoons o Lighting o Washing places o Changing rooms o Rest rooms Non statutory schemes: Housing, recreation facilities, and all that one can imagine can be extended to the workers under welfare scheme. Some industries provide schools and college, sports clubs and teams of their own, scholarships for employees’ children etc. all aimed at one thing – keep the employee and get their work. Job satisfaction: Job satisfaction or employee satisfaction has been defined in many different ways. Some believe it is simply how content an individual is with his or her job, in other words, whether or not they like the job or individual aspects or facets of jobs, such as nature of work or supervision. Others believe it is not so simplistic as this definition suggests and instead that multidimensional psychological responses to one's job are involved. Researchers have also noted that job satisfaction measures vary in the extent to which they measure feelings about the job (affective job satisfaction) or cognitions about the job (cognitive job satisfaction). 8
  9. 9. Factors affecting job satisfaction: An employee's overall satisfaction with his job is the result of a combination of factors -- and financial compensation is only one of them. Management's role in enhancing employees' job satisfaction is to make sure the work environment is positive, morale is high and employees have the resources they need to accomplish the tasks they have been assigned. Industrialisation Madurai: Important socio-economic development in the district: The District has a very few reputed organizations in the private sector like T.V.Sundaram Iyengar & Sons, Madura Coats, Fenner (I) Ltd., George Oaks Ltd. etc. which are engaged in the production of variety of goods like tyres and tubes, machineries, textile, conveyor belts etc. and also provided employment opportunities. The District offers ample scope for the field of textiles, readymade garments, bakery units, and floriculture, dairy and cold storage units, Agro and Herbal products, Granite stones, Blue metal jelly, Chamber bricks, Rubber and plastic based industries. There is also a very good scope for starting food processing and agro based industries. Infrastructure facilities & climate for industrial development: Besides for achieving parity in industrial growth and for distributing economic activities evenly all over the District, there is a need for building up the infrastructure facilities uniformly. The District Annual Credit Plan envisages implementation of good numbers of innovative and hi-tech projects in the field of agriculture, horticulture, farm forestry, and wasteland development, dairy and small-scale industries. The system of transport plays a pivotal role in overall economic development of any area. Madurai District has well laid out roads and railways lines connecting all major towns within and outside the State. The District has possessed a very good communication network. Water that is essential for industrial use and human consumption are also available plenty in most areas of the District. 9
  10. 10. 37 banking groups along with their branches are operating in this District. Banks and other financial institutions play a crucial role in promoting rapid industrial growth. They should formulate the lending strategy taking into consideration of the following factors. Taking lending decisions expeditiously based upon the viability of project reports. • Focusing increased attention on developing backward and most backward areas of the District. • Promoting new entrepreneurship based upon the genuine requirements of the borrowers TVS groups of company: TVS Group is an Indian diversified industrial conglomerate with its principal headquarters located in Madurai and presence across the Globe. Almost all holdings of the group are private. The largest and most visible subsidiary is TVS Motors, the third-largest two-wheeler manufacturers in India. TVS Group, with group revenue of more than US$6 billion, is an automotive conglomerate company, specialized in manufacturing of two-wheeler, three- wheeler, auto-electrical components, high tensile fasteners, die casting products, dealership business, brakes, wheels, tyres, axles, seating systems, fuel injection components, electronic and electrical components and many more. History: From its beginnings at the turn of the 20th century, TVS Group has grown to become the largest manufacturer and distributor of auto components in India.[citation needed] T V Sundram Iyengar and Sons Private Limited is the holding company of the TVS Group; the founder was Shri. T. V. Sundram Iyengar. Objective of the study: • To study the theoretical background of welfare measures & job satisfaction of employees • To examine the reviews of welfare measures & job satisfaction of employees. 10
  11. 11. • To find the satisfaction level of employees from the welfare measures provided by the company. • To improve additional welfare measures for the increment of job satisfaction level of the employees. • To give a valuable suggestions based on the project. Scope of the study: This study deals with the detailed analysis of the welfare measures provided in the company and the measures which can be introduced for the betterment of employees which will lower the turnover ratio of employees, attract people to come work in the firm and also to retain the current employees. Statement of the problem: Due to the low availability of welfare measures in a company that are provided to the employees ,they face many problems in personal life as well as in their career .so if there is good welfare measures for an employee, the job satisfaction will increase .According to the welfare measure provided by the company the employees satisfaction level is determined. Hence the job satisfaction of an employee will be influenced by the welfare measures of the company. Hypotheses of study: Hypothesis is usually considered as the principal instrument in research. Its main function is to suggest new experiments and observations. Operational definition of concept: Welfare measures are provided mainly by the employers. However government schemes, social set up and charitable agencies may also extent their help all aimed at improving employee health, economic betterment and social status. There are reasonable welfare 11
  12. 12. measures available to employees through statutory provisions. In most cases collective bargaining helps to improve the degree of welfare facilities. Job satisfaction is the individual opinion towards his or her job. Methodology of the study: Research: Research in common parlance refers to a search for knowledge. Once can also define research as a scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic. In fact, research is an art of scientific investigation. Research Methodology: The process used to collect information and data for the purpose of making business decisions. The methodology may include publication research, interviews, surveys, and other research techniques, and could include both present and historical information. Area of study: The study of area is conducted in Madurai. Source of data: In this study used both primary & secondary data. Period of study: 10 month Type of data collection: In this project we have used both primary and secondary data. Chapter scheme: The Project has been organized and presented in FIVE chapters 12
  13. 13. • The first chapter discusses “Introduction of the study” the need for evaluating the Containerization business in the digital age. It presents the statement of problems, objectives of the study, and scheme of the report. • The second chapter “Review of Literature” which gives the details of the existing study related to the present study. • The third chapter explains” Research Methodology”. Provides a detailed account of the selection of tools, Evaluating tools, selection of the area, selection of the sample. • The fourth chapter discusses “Analysis and Interpretation”. Provides a Descriptive analysis, different analysis, Quantitative analysis. • The fifth chapter gives a capsule “Summary of Findings, Suggestions, and Conclusion” of the major results and discussions presented in the earlier chapters and offer suggestions. 13
  14. 14. CHAPTER II Review of literature 14
  15. 15. Introduction: In this chapter, the researcher reviewed existing literature and researches on job satisfaction, job stress, role conflict, and role ambiguity. The researcher studied concepts of job satisfaction based on safety measures provided in a company. Related information was grouped under these topics. Welfare measures: The labor welfare measures provided in an organisation affect the attitudes of employees towards work. Labor welfare facilities satisfy the needs of the employees, which can improve their working life, family life and overall welfare. Various studies have explored the labor welfare facilities provided by organizations and determined its influence on job satisfaction. Review of literature on welfare measures: Joshi (1927) in his study, “Trade Union Movement in India” felt that welfare work covers all the efforts which employers make for the benefits of their employees over and above the minimum standard of working conditions fixed by the Factories Act and over and above the provisions of the social legislations providing against accident, old age, unemployment, sickness. 15
  16. 16. Chattopadhyay Ramakrishna(1938) in his study, “Social Perspective on Labor Legislation in India” discussed in detail about the importance given to social security in various legislations, which are enacted from time to time by the Government of India. Seth (1940) in his study “Labor in Indian Coal Industry” discussed the agonies of Indian Coal miners under colonial rule. Radha Kamal Mukerjee (1945) conducts a study on, “The Indian Working Class” dealt with the problems of low earnings and the sad state of housing then prevalent in the Indian Collieries. The cement plant was covered under the Factories Act (1948) and its rules. The plant provided almost all welfare facilities as per the stipulations of the Act. These included drinking water, cool water facility, bathrooms, latrines, urinals, locker facility, comfortable sitting arrangement, spittoons, first aid boxes, training in first aid, lunchrooms cum rest rooms, and canteen facilities. The cement plant also implemented the Workmen's Compensation Act (1923), Payment of Gratuity Act (1972) and a provident fund trust was constituted for the benefit of workers. In addition to the statutory welfare facilities, this plant undertook various other voluntary welfare programmes to promote the well-being of its employees. A township was built for the employees, with 783 quarters provided at nominal rents to the employees. A cooperative credit society and consumer stores were set up in the township. The company established an education society for the education of the employees' children. The company also provided full-fledged medical facilities to the employees and their family members. Transport facilities, recreation facilities, shopping complex was also provided for the benefit of the employees and their families. Thus it could be observed that the company provided various labor welfare facilities and these included both statutory and non-statutory welfare facilities. With regard to the awareness of the labor welfare amenities, the findings of the study revealed that all the respondent employees of the study were aware of the available labor welfare facilities, which included both statutory and non-statutory welfare facilities. Moreover all the respondents were using the various labor welfare facilities provided to them. On the aspect of satisfaction with labor welfare facilities all the respondents of the study expressed satisfaction with regard to drinking water, spittoons, first aid appliances, latrines 16
  17. 17. and urinals, sitting facilities and rest rooms. With regard to workers education, all respondents who were sent for programmes expressed their satisfaction over it. With respect to the canteen provided, all respondents of the study were happy with its location, ventilations, fans and hygienic conditions of the canteen. However, some of the respondents (29 percent) were dissatisfied with the foodstuff provided by the canteen, while a few of them (11 percent) complained on the services provided by the canteen staff and very few of them were dissatisfied with the prices of the food items. With regard to housing facility, a great majority of the respondents was happy with quarters' allotment policy of the organization (89 percent). But many of them were not happy with the housing loan policy (97 percent), because the policy did not allow them to take loans to build houses in the locality of their choice. The study also found that all the respondents were satisfied with the availability of the provisions in the cooperative stores and its credit facility but dissatisfaction stemmed from cooperative loan facility for a majority of the respondents. With regard to medical facilities, all of them were satisfied with ambulance facility but in case of the remaining items (nursing staff, services of consultant doctors, diagnosis, treatment and medicines given in the company hospital) there was dissatisfaction expressed by some of the respondents. Concerning recreational facilities, all those respondents using the recreational club facilities and participating in cultural programmes were happy with them. A few of the user respondents were unhappy with the library and cable T.V. facility. According to the study canteen, housing, cooperatives, children education, medical facilities and recreational facilities were major aspects of employee welfare that affect the quality of life of employees and their family members. As for the social security provided by the organization all of the respondents were happy with regard to provident fund and the functioning of the provident fund trust committee, and a large majority of them were satisfied with Workmen's Compensation. Further the study drew attention to the relationship between age and satisfaction with welfare facilities. Older employees were satisfied more with canteen food, quarter allotment policy and quality of teaching. Middle age respondents were satisfied more with cooperative loan, 17
  18. 18. treatment and medicines given in the company hospital. Younger respondents participated more in club activities whereas older ones participated in cultural activities. Moreover the study revealed that category of employment was a major factor affecting satisfaction. The results showed that the monthly rated employees were more satisfied with the labor welfare facilities provided than the daily rated employees. It may be concluded that the organization under study provided various welfare facilities (statutory and non-statutory) for the benefit of workers and their families. This reflects the commitment of the management towards employee welfare. Employees are familiar with the welfare facilities. They are making use of these facilities depending on their needs. Overall a majority of them were satisfied with these facilities. The findings also revealed significant association between satisfaction with labor welfare facilities and age and category of employment. However the study did not analyze the level of job satisfaction of employees, the influence of labor welfare facilities on the level of job satisfaction, and that of gender and experience on job satisfaction. Punekar Sadanand Dattatreya (1942-49) in his study, “Social Insurance of Indian Industrial Workers” stated that social insurance aims at granting adequate benefits to the insured on a compulsory basis in times of unemployment, sickness and other contingencies with a view to ensure a minimum standard of living. He concluded that social insurance is absent in almost all the industries barring a few. Srivastava (1953) in his study, “Labor Welfare in India” detailed upon the labor welfare measures undertaken by select public and private sector companies in India. He found that public sector companies are far better than their private counterparts in the provision of welfare facilities to workers and employees. Agarwal Amarnarain (1957) in his study, “Insurance in India with reference to Social Security” explained the role of insurance in providing social security to people. He felt that huge scope exists for insurance business in India as the penetration of insurance business among the masses is highly low. Shanti Arora (1957) in the study, “The Social Security in India” felt that the various Acts and legislations made by the Government failed to provide social security to the masses. 18
  19. 19. Verma Omprakash (1958-65) in his study, “Labor Welfare and Industrial Peace in India” stated that many industries failed to provide adequate welfare facilities to their employees due to which industrial unrest had become a common phenomenon among various industries. Srivastava (1970) explores about the, “A Socio-Economic Survey of the Workers” in the Coal Mines of India (with special reference to Bihar) studied the socio-economic conditions of coal workers in Bihar. The study found that the socio-economic conditions of miners in Bihar are so poor due to high indebtedness, low wages and poor welfare facilities. Hasan (1972) conducts a study on, “The Social Security System of India” felt that social security schemes have characteristics such as provision of cash and medical relief and also the active involvement of the State in the provision of social security. He further stated that social security benefits are provided to employees as of right. Kudchelkar (1979) in his study, “Aspects of Personnel Management and Industrial Relations” felt that the need for labor welfare arises from the very nature of the industrial system. He felt that employers need to provide welfare facilities to employees as the latter are exposed to various risks and at the same time they have to work in an entirely strange atmosphere. Tyagi (1982) states about, “Labor Economics and Social Welfare” discussed the labor welfare practices in India such as the provision of intramural and extra-mural welfare facilities. He also discussed the various agencies involved in labor welfare. However, the study is totally theoretical in nature. Pramod Varma (1987) in his study, “Labor Economics and Industrial Relations” stated that organizations provide three types of welfare facilities. According to him, the first type of welfare facilities is related to the provision of subsidized canteens, crèches and medical facilities while the second type of welfare facilities is related to consumer cooperative stores, cooperative credit societies and educational assistance. The third type of welfare facilities is provided by community centers, welfare centres etc. Ahuja (1988) conducts a study on, “Personnel Management” emphasized the need for labor welfare and social security in India. He felt that provision of welfare and social security measures makes the employees satisfied with their jobs leading to their improved performance. 19
  20. 20. Arun Monappa (1990) states about the, “Industrial Relations” discussed labor welfare and social security measures in detail. He also explained the various problems faced by the enforcement machinery in the implementation of these welfare and social security measures. Tripathi (1998) explores about the, “Personnel Management & Industrial Relations” explained the principles of labor welfare services, types of labor welfare services, different legislations and Acts. He also discussed the social security measures in terms of medical care, sickness benefit, unemployment benefit, maternity benefit etc., besides explaining the social security system in India. David, A Decenzo (2001) and Stephen P. Robbins in their study, “Personnel / Human Resource Management explained the various benefits and services provided by the companies to their employees. According to them, the legally required benefits and services include social security premiums, unemployment compensation, workers compensation and state disability programs. They felt that the cost of the voluntary benefits offered appears to be increasing. Michael (2001) states about, “Human Resource Management and Human Relations” said that the provision of intra-mural and extra-mural welfare facilities help in improving the quality of work life of employees thereby good human relations will develop among different cadres of employees. Kannan (2001) stated that the ever increasing demand for welfare funds for each and every sub-sector of the informal sector may be viewed as a desperate reaction of the workers for a measure of social security in an unprotected labor market. Pylee and Simon George(2001) in their study, “Industrial Relations and Personnel Management” stated that companies should provide retirement benefits such as provident fund, gratuity and pension to employees. They felt that the provision of these benefits assists employees to be free from fear of want and fear of starvation besides instilling in them a feeling of security. Punekar, Deodhar and Sankaran (2004) explores about the, “Labor Welfare, Trade Unionism and Industrial Relations” stated that labor welfare is anything done for the comfort and improvement, intellectual and social-well being of the employees over and above the wages paid which is not a necessity of the industry. 20
  21. 21. Shashi, K. Gupta and Rosy Joshi (2005) conducts a study on, “Human Resource Management” discussed “labor welfare” in detail. The book covers all the aspects of labor welfare such as types of labor welfare, statutory provisions concerning welfare, approaches to welfare and also the significance of labor welfare. Mamoria et al.,(2005) in their study, “Dynamics of Industrial Relations” discussed the welfare facilities provided by various organisations such as cotton mills in Mumbai, Jute mills, steel plants, mines, plantations, railways, postal & telegraphs, ports and dockyards. They also discussed the employee welfare measures undertaken by the Government from the First Five Year Plan to Eighth Five Year Plan period. Singh (2005) explores about the, “Industrial Relations: Emerging Paradigms“ stated that social security is an attack on five giants such as wants, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness. According to him, social security is not a burden but a kind of wise investment that offers good social dividends in the long run. Venkata Ratnam (2006) in his study , “Industrial Relations” discussed the provisions made for social security in the constitution of India, labor legislations, collective agreements and voluntary arrangements for the organised sector. He also discussed the key issues in social security in the context of the emerging socio-economic environment. Micheal Armstrong (2006) states about, “A Hand Book of Human Resource Management” discussed the various welfare services provided to employees in detail. He stated that the provision of welfare services in terms of individual services, group services and employment assistance programs help in improving the identification of employees with the companies in which they are employed. Malik (2007) in his study discussed the various welfare measures to be provided to workers and employees under various Acts Viz., Mines Act, 1952, Factories Act, 1948, Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 etc. Aquinas (2007) conducts a study on, “Human Resource Management” explained the intra- mural and extra-mural welfare benefits provided to employees. He stated that some welfare benefits are provided as per legislation while some other welfare benefits are provided voluntarily by management or as a result of bi-partite settlements between the Management and Trade Unions. 21
  22. 22. Scott Snell and George Bohlander (2007) states about, “Human Resource Management” throw light on the various benefits especially social security benefits such as provident fund, gratuity, pension and insurance cover provided to employees. Gary Dessler and Biju Varkkey (2009) states about, “Human Resource Management” discussed the benefits and services provided to employees in India. They also discussed the benefits to be provided as per Central or State Law besides the discretionary benefits provided by employers. John M. Ivancevich (2010) in his study, “Human Resource Management” stated that an employer has no choice about offering mandated benefits programs and cannot change them in any way without getting involved in the political process to change the existing laws. According to him, the three mandated programmes are unemployment insurance, social security and a worker’s compensation. Aswathappa (2010) conducts a study on, “Human Resource Management” discussed the various types of benefits and services provided to employees in terms of payment for time not worked, insurance benefits, compensation benefits, pension plans etc. He also discussed the ways to administer the benefits and services in a better way. Goyal (1995) in this study, determined the extent of job satisfaction experienced by textile workers due to primarily the statutory labor welfare facilities provided in the private, public and co-operative textile sectors in Punjab, the awareness and implementation of these labor welfare facilities and their correlation with job satisfaction, including the relationship between labor welfare and job satisfaction. However, the researcher did not investigate the influence of personal factors (gender, age and experience) and hierarchy on the level of job satisfaction of the textile workers studied, compare the level of job satisfaction experienced by these workers in the different sectors of the textile industry, the influence of the non-statutory labor welfare facilities on job satisfaction and the differential influence in the dimensions of labor welfare facilities on the level of job satisfaction. Srivastava (2004) in his research study titled Impact of Labor Welfare on Employees Attitudes and Job Satisfaction, a comparative study was conducted on workers in the private and public sectors of Kanpur city. The researcher attempted to assess the quality of labor welfare activities, measure the degree of job satisfaction of workers provided with labor 22
  23. 23. welfare facilities in private and public sectors and evaluate the attitudes of workers towards management in both the sectors. With the help of three standardized instruments, data was collected for the purpose of the study. These included Labor Welfare Inventory by Srivastava (2002), which had a total of 47 items and measured eight dimensions of labor welfare facilities, Job Satisfaction Scale constructed and standardized by Srivastava (1996) consisting of 38 items and measuring nine dimensions of job satisfaction and Attitudes of Workers towards Management constructed and standardized by Kapoor (1972) consisting of 20 items. Incidental sampling technique was used to determine the sample of 100 workers each from the private and public sectors of Kanpur city. Thus the total sample of the study constituted 200 workers from the private and public sectors. The results of the study showed that better labor welfare facilities have a deep impact on workers psyche. If the conditions of workers are improved and they are provided with good labor welfare facilities they will be more satisfied in their jobs. Welfare facilities work as incentives for workers. The study also found that there was a significant difference in the labor welfare facilities provided in the private and public sector. The public sector provides better facilities to their workers than the private sector. However welfare facilities like subsidized loan, canteen and safety of workers scored significantly higher in private sector than the public sector. Significant difference was also found in the job satisfaction experienced between private and public sector workers. The public sector workers were more satisfied with their jobs than private sector workers. Public sector workers experienct, job security and get promotion on the basis of kindness from authority, while private sector workers feel job insecurity and get promotion on the basis of hard work and performance. Moreover the private sector workers also received very good salaries and incentives than public sector workers. A significant difference was also found in the attitudes of workers towards management in the two sectors. Public sector workers had a favourable (pro) attitude towards management while the private sector workers had an unfavourable (anti) attitude towards management. Furthermore workers who perceived better welfare in their organizations had a favorable attitude towards management as compared to the workers who perceived poor welfare facilities in their organizations. Workers who perceived better welfare activities experienced 23
  24. 24. higher degree of job satisfaction compared to those who perceived poor welfare facilities in private as well as public sectors. According to this better welfare facilities influence job satisfaction. Srivastava (2004) thus made an in depth study of the influence of labor welfare facilities on job satisfaction, including its effect on the attitude towards management, the comparative difference in the labor welfare facilities provided between the private and public sectors and the attitudes of workers towards management in the two sectors. The researcher did not probe into the personal factors (gender, age and experience) influencing the level of job satisfaction, the influence of the dimensions of labor welfare facilities on the level of job satisfaction, the statutory and non-statutory labor welfare facilities and its influence on job satisfaction of workers. Further no attempt was made to study the influence of hierarchy on the level of job satisfaction in these industries. Agnihotri (2002) the study on labor welfare and job satisfaction was conducted by this study on Labor Welfare Activities and Its Impact on Laborer Behaviour found that job satisfaction and the different dimension of welfare facilities was significantly related. Srimannarayana and Srinivas (2005) conducted a study titled Welfare Facilities in a Cement Plant: Employees' Awareness, Utilization and Satisfaction which analyzed welfare facilities provided by the plant, its administration and examined the extent of awareness, utilization and satisfaction of the employees with the welfare facilities. For the purpose of the study a private cement plant located in rural India was selected. The sample of the study constituted officers in the personal department (management) and a random sample of 100 workers covering 50 monthly rated employees and 50 daily rated employees. A schedule was administered to the sample to collect their viewpoint on welfare. Kumar (2003) conducted a study 0n the title Labor Welfare and Social Security: Awareness, Utilization And Satisfaction of Labor Laws. The study was on workers in selected medium scale and large scale units equally drawn from public and private sectors in Haryana. A representative sample of 12 units was selected from these industries in Haryana. The objective of the study was to ascertain the level of awareness, the extent of implementation and utility of selected labor laws among the workers in the selected units. A comparison was made of the awareness, implementation and utility of selected labor laws in the public and private sectors chosen for the study. 24
  25. 25. The results of the study revealed that on the awareness aspect of the factories Act (1948) workers in the private sectors were relatively more aware of the existence of the Factories Act compared to workers in the public sectors. Considering the modus operandi of different provisions of the Act it was found that workers in the public sectors were relatively more aware of the provisions in the Factories Act such as health, safety, welfare, and annual leave with wages than workers in the private sectors. Similar results were realized for large scale and medium scale units of the public sectors, but in the case of safety provisions awareness was more in the large-scale units of the private sectors and medium scale units of the public sectors. On the aspect of implementation of the Factories Act the proportion of workers satisfied with the provisions of the Act (ventilation, temperature, drinking water, cleanliness and welfare) was relatively more in the public sectors than private sectors. The Act's provision on lighting, safety, overtime, and rest room facilities were noticed to be provided more in the private sectors, while the proportion of workers satisfied with the provision of first-aid and canteen in the private and public sectors were found to be the same. On the utility front of the provisions of the Factories Act the proportion of workers expressing high utility was relatively more in public sectors than private sectors except on the health provision. With the other labor laws studied such as Minimum Wages Act the workers in the public sectors were found to be more aware of the existence of the Act than workers in the private sectors. With the implementation of the Act workers in the public sectors were found relatively more satisfied with the provisions of the Act, except with the wage rate of different classes. The proportion of workers expressing high utility of provisions of the Act (except the wage rate of different classes and employment covered provisions) was relatively higher in the public sectors. The awareness of labor laws like Provident Fund Act, Employees' State Insurance Act and Workmen's Compensation Act was found to be high for all respondents in the private and public sectors of the study. The study stressed upon only the statutory welfare facilities as determined by the labor laws and the extent of awareness, implementation and utility of these laws for workers in the selected public and private sectors in Haryana. The study brought out the comparative 25
  26. 26. differences in the awareness, implementation and utility of labor laws between the private and public sectors. The study did not consider the level of job satisfaction of workers in these sectors, the influence of labor welfare facilities on job satisfaction, personal factors influencing job satisfaction and the impact of statutory and non-statutory labor welfare facilities on job satisfaction. Gani (1993) in his study on Quality of Work Life in a State Setting: Finding of an Empirical Study attempted to examine some important aspects of quality of work life, adopted from various studies in India and abroad. Using the technique of stratified proportionate sampling, the sample of the study constituted 250 workers from five large and medium scale manufacturing public and private sector units in Kashmir and Jammu Divisions. A comprehensive interview schedule was prepared and used after proper pretesting to elicit information from workers on various issues under the study. The information was secured from respondents through personal investigation methods. Like type technique was used to prepare the scale while selecting items to measure the attitudes of workers. With a view to measure the level of workers' job satisfaction, a scale developed and standardized by Ganguli (1954) consisting of 30 internally consistent statements and measuring nine dimensions of job satisfaction was used with slight modification. Results of the study revealed that wage discontent, deplorable working and living conditions, job insecurity and poor industrial relations climate, continues to be the major consideration in employees working lives. Furthermore considering that the increase in earnings have not led to an increase in real wages and that the improvements in wages alone can neither satisfy the worker nor cause job mobility and work commitment among them, the results draw attention to the fact that the non-wage incentives should receive more attention than they have received hitherto. These are in the form of dress, items subsidized, housing and canteens, family planning, recreational activities, transport, education, health care assistance which would go a long way in improving the lot of workers. With respect to various aspects of the job, majority of the workers were to a great extent dissatisfied with their wages, welfare facilities, working conditions, security of service, and nature of job, supervisory behavior, promotion opportunities, and personal policies. From the results it was found that workers recognize the supervisor's relation with workers as most important aspect of the job. 26
  27. 27. The study by Gani (1993) stressed upon the importance of non-wage incentives, which comes under the purview of non-statutory labor welfare facilities. Moreover the various aspects of the job in which majority of the workers were highly dissatisfied are part of labor welfare facilities. It determined the level of job satisfaction experienced by workers. However the research did not study the influence of the dimensions of quality of work life or in other words the labor welfare facilities on job satisfaction, nor did it study the influence of personal variables, hierarchy, and that of statutory and no statutory welfare facilities on job satisfaction. Sharan (1980) conducted a study on working conditions and job satisfaction. Six aspects of working conditions studied were wages, job security, benefits, promotional prospects, physical atmosphere at work, and social relationship with immediate bosses. The researcher found that the accumulative effects of these adverse working conditions have rendered work unpleasant for the respondents. Further it was found that if these working conditions show any marked improvement particularly in wages, then the respondent's satisfaction with their job is likely to improve considerably. Kumar and Yadav (2002) conducted a study on title Satisfaction Level from Labor Welfare Schemes in Sugar Factories in Gorakhpur Division, examined the labor welfare schemes in the eight State government and private sector sugar factories of the Gorakhpur Division in Uttar Pradesh. Based on stratified random sampling, 240 workers were interviewed from these sugar factories, using a well-structured interview schedule. The results revealed that, overall the satisfaction level of workers from labor welfare schemes was low in both the private and State sugar factories. Further, the workers in both sectors ranked the four labor welfare schemes according to their importance, which fell in the following order housing scheme, medical scheme, followed by education and recreation schemes. However when a comparison was made between the respondents in the private and State sugar factories it was observed that worker's satisfaction level from welfare measures which affects work environment, is higher in the private sector sugar factories than in the State government sugar factories. Moreover satisfaction of workers from social security schemes, housing, medical schemes, education scheme, was higher for workers in the private sector sugar factories than the State government sugar factories. The study concluded that workers in State government sugar factories have less satisfaction from welfare schemes compared to those in the private sector sugar factories. 27
  28. 28. The study made a comparative analysis of labor welfare schemes in the private and public sector sugar factories. But it did not include the study of job satisfaction, hierarchy and labor welfare. From the review of literature it can be realized that only a few researchers have shown interest in analyzing labor welfare facilities and its influence on job satisfaction. Reference:  Joshi, M.M, “Trade Union Movement in India”, Bombay, 1927, pp.157-169.  Seth, B.R, “Labour in Indian Coal Industry”, D.B Taraporawala Sons & Co., Bombay, 1940, p.85.  Radhakamal Mukerjee, “The Indian Working Class”, Hindi Kitabs, Bombay, 1945, p.137.  Srivastava, V.L, “A Socio-economic Survey of the Workers in the Coal Mines of India (With special reference to Bihar), Scientific Book Agency, Calcutta, 1970, p.53.  Hasan, N. “The Social Security System of India, S. Chand & Co, New Delhi, 1972, p.4.  Kudchelkar, D.L.S. “Aspects of Personnel Management and Industrial Relations”, Excel Books, New Delhi, 1979, p.10  Tyagi, B.P. “Labour Economics and Social Welfare”, Educational Publishers, Meerut, 1982, pp. 595-613.  Pramod Varma, “Labour Economics and Industrial Relations”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, 1987, p. 381.  Ahuja, K.K. “Labour Welfare and Social Security” in Personnel Management, Kalyani publishers, New Delhi, 1988 pp. 935-947. 28
  29. 29.  Arun Monappa, “Labour Welfare and Social Security” in Industrial Relations, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, 1990, pp. 243271.  Tripathi, P.C. “Labour Welfare and Social Security”, Personnel Management and Industrial Relations”, Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi, 1998 pp 325-363.  David A. Decenzo and Stephen P. Robbins, “Benefits and Services” Personnel / Human Management, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited, New Delhi, 2001, pp. 451-475.  Michael, V.P. “Labour Welfare Measures and Labour Welfare Officers” in Human Resource Management and Human Relations, Himalaya publishing House, Mumbai, 2001, pp.612-618.  Kannan, K.P. “State Assisted Social Security for poverty Alleviation and Human Development: Kerala’s Record and its Lessons”, In Mahendra Devetal, Social and Economic Security in India, New Delhi, Institute of Human Development, 2001, pp. 314-319.  Pylee M.V. and Simon George A, ”Retirement Benefits in Industrial Relations and Personnel Management, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, 2003, pp. 153- 160.  Punekar, Deodhar and Sankaran, ”Labour Welfare, Trade Unionism and Industrial Relations”, Himalaya Publishing House, Mumbai, 2004, p.24.  Shashi, K. Gupta, “Labour Welfare” in Human Resource Management, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi 2005, pp. 26.1 -26.13.  Mamoria, C.B, Mamoria Satish and Gankar, S.V “Labour Welfare Work and Institution of Labour Welfare Officer” in Dynamics of Industrial Relations, Himalaya Publishing House, Mumbai, 2005, pp. 529-565.  Singh, B.D, “Industrial Relations: Emerging Paradigms”, Excel Books, New Delhi, 2005, pp. 228-229.  Venkata Ratnam, C.S, “Industrial Relations” Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2006, pp. 478-479. 29
  30. 30.  Micheal Armstrong, “A Hand Book of Human Resource Management”, Kogan Page LTD, New Delhi, 2006, pp. 845-857.  Malik, P.L. “Hand book of Labour and Industrial Law”, Eastern Book Company, Lucknow, 2007, pp. 633-634.  Aquinas P.G, “Human Resource Management”, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, 2007, pp. 184-191.  Scott Snell and George Bohlander, “Human Resource Management” Cengage India Private Ltd, New Delhi, 2007, pp. 447-482.  Garry Dessler and Biju Varkkey, “Human Resource Management,” Dorling Kindersley (India) Pvt Ltd., New Delhi, 2009, pp.513-546.  John M Ivancevich, “Human Resource Management”, Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited, New Delhi, 2010, pp. 255-383.  Aswathappa, K. “Human Resource Management”, Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited, New Delhi, 2010, pp. 378-392. THESES 38. Ramakrishna chattopadhyay, “Social Perspective on Labour Legislation in India”, Unpublished thesis submitted to the University of Calcutta, Calcutta, 1932.  Punekar Sadananda Dattatreya, “Social Insurance of Indian Industrial Workers” Unpublished thesis submitted to the University of Bombay, 19421949. 30
  31. 31. CHAPTER III RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Research Introduction: The research approach for this topic was based on both qualitative and quantitative approach that entailed the generation of data in form of description and numbers which can be subjected to accurate qualitative and quantitative analysis in a formal and fashion. These approaches could further be sub classified into inferential, experimental and simulation approaches. But for the researchers of this study, were based on inferential approach since it is useful in formulation of data base showing dissimilar attribute of targeted group or respondents. Research Design: 31
  32. 32. Research design refers to the way in which its subject or constituents such as customers are organized and observed, research designs can be regarded as traditionally categorized as experimental or observational(Fink A.2005). The study aimed to use one among the type of research. The research Design for the researched topic was based on Descriptive research which concerned with describing the characteristics of the groups or individual and determine the frequency with which the information obtained or its association with something else. “It is necessary to have a clear picture of the phenomenon on which you wish to collect data prior to the collection of data”(Kothari, 2006). This means that a descriptive study pre-supposes much prior knowledge about the phenomenon being studied. Another reason for choosing exploratory research design is nature of the study being studied, which is clearly defined in the statement of the study. Study area: Madurai is a major city and cultural headquarters in the state of Tamil Nadu in India. It is the administrative headquarters of Madurai District and the 31st largest urban agglomeration in India. Madurai is the third largest city by area and third largest city by population in Tamil Nadu. Located on the banks of River Vaigai, Madurai has been a major settlement for two millennia and is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Madurai is closely associated with the Tamil language, and the third Tamil Sangam, a major congregation of Tamil scholars said to have been held in the city. The recorded history of the city goes back to the 3rd century BCE, being mentioned by Megasthenes, the Greek ambassador to India, and Kautilya, a minister of the Mauryan emperor Chandragupta Maurya. Signs of human settlements and Roman trade links dating back to 300BC are evident from excavations by Archeological Survey of India in Manalur.The city is believed to be of significant antiquity and has been ruled, at different times, by the Pandyas, Cholas, Madurai Sultanate, Vijayanagar Empire, Madurai Nayaks, Carnatic kingdom, and the British. The city has a number of historical monuments, with the Meenakshi Amman Temple and Tirumalai Nayak Palace being the most prominent. Madurai is an important industrial and educational hub in South Tamil Nadu. The city is home to various automobile, rubber, chemical and granite manufacturing industries. It has developed as a second-tier city for information technology (IT), and some software companies have opened offices in Madurai. The Tamil Nadu government has planned a satellite town for Madurai near Thoppur. Madurai has 32
  33. 33. important government educational institutes like the Madurai Medical College, Homeopathic Medical College, Madurai Law College, Agricultural College and Research Institute. Madurai city is administered by a municipal corporation established in 1971 as per the Municipal Corporation Act. Madurai is the second corporation in Tamil Nadu next to Chennai corporation. The city covers an area of 242.97 km2 and had a population of 1,017,865 in 2011. The city is also the seat of a bench of the Madras High Court, one of only a few courts outside the state capitals of India. Population of the city: According to 2011 census based on per-expansion limits, thea area covered under the Madurai Municipal Corporation had a population of 1,017,865 with a sex-ratio of 999 females for every 1,000 males, much above the national average of 929. A total of 100,324 were under the age of six, constituting 51,485 males and 48,839 females. Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes accounted for 6.27% and .31% of the population respectively. The average literacy of the city was 81.95%, compared to the national average of 72.99%. There were a total of 391,315 workers, comprising 1,224 cultivators, 2,178 main agricultural laborers, 11,282 in house hold industries, 348,849 other workers, 27,782 marginal workers, 388 marginal cultivators, 616 marginal agricultural laborers, 1,611 marginal workers in household industries and 25,167 other marginal workers. The Madurai metropolitan area (urban agglomeration) had a population of 1,465,625.Madurai metropolitan area constitutes the third largest metropolitan area in Tamil Nadu and the 31st in India. Data types and sources: Both secondary and primary sources were used for stance the official statistics were collected including a review of earlier studies on TVS Company in Madurai. Secondary information was supplemented with primary data which were obtained through questionnaires based interviews. There was a need to go beyond secondary data as reliability and method of collection could be questioned, and as some of the important information were not officially available. Therefore, an additional (own) survey in Madurai was implemented to fill in data gaps and possibly correct or improve upon existing data. The survey also provided data used in qualitative analysis. During the survey, officials in large hotels and 33
  34. 34. lodges were questioned in each location, about their trends, their average occupancy rates, their level of services to the tourists and their relationship with other stakeholders such as tour operators, travel agents, tourists and government officials were interviewed. Sampling procedures and sample size: Sampling is the process of selecting respondents to be involved in the study from the studied population. In addition, it can be defined as the process of obtaining information about an entire population by examining only a part of it . Sample size: 100 employees Types of sampling of sampling: There are two types of sampling which are probability and non probability sampling with their sub branches for each. Methods of data collection: The collection of data involved a number of ways include the followings; Questionnaires: This involved Semi structured and unstructured questions that were used so as to generate information and data, which subsequently will be used for both qualitative and quantitative analyses. Open –ended and closed ended questionnaires were designed to give opportunities to the respondents to give out their views concerning the research questions Specific questionnaires for each group were designed such as questionnaires for employees who works in that company, questionnaires for the staff members in Management of the surveyed company, and alike. Observations: Observing during the field work is mainly to assist and to probe an issue beyond those which are covered in the structured questionnaire and interview checklist. As the researchers we had to observe on the ways how the service was provided to the employees. 34
  35. 35. Procedures and methods of data processing and analysis: i. Descriptive statistics including frequency, tables, percentages and ratios were used ii. Computation and interpretation of welfare measures and job satisfaction information which have been provided by respondents. Tools:  Simple percentage analysis 35
  36. 36. CHAPTER IV DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 4.1.1: Table 1 Gender of the respondents: 36 Gender Male Female Total Frequency 45 45 90 Percentage 50% 50% 100%
  37. 37. Inference The above table shows that the 50% of the respondents are male and the other 50% of the respondents are female that is among the 90 respondents, 45 respondents are male and the other 45 respondents are female. 4.1.1: Figure 1 Gender of the respondents: 37
  38. 38. 4.1.2: Table 2 Age of the respondents: 38
  39. 39. Inference: The above table shows that the majority if the respondents are in the age category of 18-25 (36.7%),33.3% of the respondents are between the age of 26-35 , 22.2% of the respondents are between the age of 36-45 and 7.8% of the respondents are between the age of 46-55. 4.1.2: Figure 2 Age of the respondents: 39 Age in years 18-25 26-35 36-45 46-55 Total Frequency 33 30 20 7 90 Percentage 36.7% 33.3% 22.2% 7.8% 100%
  40. 40. 4.1.3: Table 3 Marital status of the respondents: 40
  41. 41. Marital status Single Married Widow Widower Total Frequency 39 49 2 0 90 Percentage 43.3% 54.5% 2.2% 0% 100% Inference: The above table shows that the majority of the respondents are married (54.5%), 43.3% of the respondents are single,2.2% of the respondents are widow and 0% of the respondents are widower. 4.1.3: Figure 3 Marital status of the respondents: 41
  42. 42. 4.1.4: Table 4 Experience level of respondents: 42
  43. 43. Experience Below 5 Below 10 Below 15 Above 15 Total Frequency 40 28 16 6 90 Percentage 44.5% 40% 17.8% 6.7% 100% Inference: The above table shows that the majority of the respondents are at the experience of below 5 (44.5%), 40% of the respondents are below 10, 17.8% of the respondents are below 15 and 6.7% of the respondents are above 15 years of working experience. 4.1.4: Figure 4 43
  44. 44. Experience level of respondents: 4.1.5: Table 5 44
  45. 45. Working environment of the company: Level Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 68 18 4 0 0 Percentage 75.6% 20% 4.4% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (68) of the respondents strongly satisfy the working environment of the company, 18 respondents satisfy the statement and 4 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents strongly satisfy the working environment of the company. 45
  46. 46. 4.1.5: Figure 5 Working environment of the company: 46
  47. 47. 4.1.6: Table 6 Medical benefits provided to the employees and their families by the company: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 25 57 8 0 0 Percentage 27.8% 63.3% 8.9% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (57) of the respondents satisfy the medical benefits provided in the company, 25 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 8 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the medical benefits provided in the company. 47
  48. 48. 4.1.6: Figure 6 Medical benefits provided to the employees and their families by the company: 48
  49. 49. 4.1.7: Table 7 Working hours of the company: 49
  50. 50. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 18 70 2 0 0 Percentage 20% 77.8% 2.2% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (70) of the respondents satisfy the rate of working hours the company, 18 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 2 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the rate of working hours of the company. 4.1.7: Figure 7 50
  51. 51. Working hours of the company: 4.1.8: Table 8 51
  52. 52. Recreation place allotted by the company: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 26 20 34 10 0 Percentage 28.9% 22.2% 37.8% 11.1% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (34) of the respondents averagely satisfy the recreation place allotted by the company, 26 respondents strongly satisfy the statement, 20 respondents are satisfy the statement and other 10 respondents dissatisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents averagely satisfy the recreation place allotted by the company. 52
  53. 53. 4.1.8: Figure 8 Recreation place allotted by the company: 53
  54. 54. 4.1.9: Table 9 Leave policy of the company: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 20 58 12 0 0 Percentage 22.2% 64.5% 13.3% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (58) of the respondents satisfy the leave policy of the company, 20 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 12 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the leave policy of the company. 54
  55. 55. 4.1.9: Figure 9 Leave policy of the company: 55
  56. 56. 4.1.10: Table 10 Canteen service in the company: 56
  57. 57. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 50 24 16 0 0 Percentage 55.6% 26.7% 17.8% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (50) of the respondents strongly satisfy the canteen service provided by the company, 24 respondents satisfy the statement and 16 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents strongly satisfy the canteen service provided by the company. 4.1.10: Figure 10 Canteen service in the company: 57
  58. 58. 4.1.11: Table 11 Restroom and lunch room facility in the company: 58
  59. 59. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 16 55 19 0 0 Percentage 17.8% 61.1% 21.1% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majorities (55) of the respondents satisfy the rest room and lunch room facility provided by the company, 16 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 19 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the rest room and lunch room facility provided by the company. 4.1.11: Figure 11 59
  60. 60. Restroom and lunch room facility in the company: 4.1.12: Table 12 60
  61. 61. Maternity or paternity leave for the employees in the company: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 27 39 25 0 0 Percentage 30% 43.3% 27.8% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (39) of the respondents satisfy the maternity or paternity leave provided by the company, 27 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 25 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the maternity or paternity leave provided by the company. 61
  62. 62. 4.1.12: Figure 12 Maternity or paternity leave for the employees in the company: 62
  63. 63. 4.1.13: Table 13 First aid procedures and safety measures in the company: 63
  64. 64. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 30 59 1 0 0 Percentage 33.3% 65.6% 1.1% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (59) of the respondents satisfy the first aid and safety measures provided in the company, 30 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 1 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the first aid and safety measures provided in the company. 4.1.13: Figure 13 First aid procedures and safety measures in the company: 64
  65. 65. 4.1.14: Table 14 Overall satisfaction level of employees on welfare activities: 65
  66. 66. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 7 78 5 0 0 Percentage 7.8% 86.7% 5.5% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (78) of the respondents satisfy the overall welfare measures provided in the company, 7 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 5 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the overall welfare measures provided in the company. 4.1.14: Figure 14 66
  67. 67. Overall satisfaction level of employees on welfare activities: 4.1.15: Table 15 67
  68. 68. The work according to the qualification of the employee: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 65 16 9 0 0 Percentage 72.2% 17.8% 10% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (65) of the respondents strongly satisfy their work is based on their qualification and skills, 16 respondents satisfy the statement and 9 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents strongly satisfy their work is based on their qualification and skills. 68
  69. 69. 4.1.15: Figure 15 The work according to the qualification of the employee: 69
  70. 70. 4.1.16: Table 16 Employee’s satisfaction on top management: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 70 12 8 0 0 Percentage 77.8% 13.3% 8.9% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (70) of the respondents strongly satisfy the top management of the company, 12 respondents satisfy the statement and 8 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents strongly satisfy the top management of the company. 70
  71. 71. 4.1.16: Figure 16 Employee’s satisfaction on top management: 71
  72. 72. 4.1.17: Table 17 Employee salary in the company according to the work: 72
  73. 73. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 23 67 0 0 0 Percentage 25.6% 74.4% 0% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (67) of the respondents satisfy their salary based on their work provided in the company and other 23 respondents strongly satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy their salary based on the work provided in the company. 4.1.17: Figure 17 73
  74. 74. Employee salary in the company according to the work: 4.1.18: Table 18 74
  75. 75. Necessary authority to perform the duties effectively by the employees: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 41 22 27 0 0 Percentage 45.6% 24.4% 30% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (41) of the respondents strongly satisfy that they have necessary authority to perform their duties effectively in the company, 22 respondents satisfy the statement and 27 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents strongly satisfy that they have necessary authority to perform their duties effectively in the company. 75
  76. 76. 4.1.18: Figure 18 Necessary authority to perform the duties effectively by the employees: 76
  77. 77. 4.1.19: Table 19 Counselling programs for the employees: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 10 51 29 0 0 Percentage 11.1% 56.7% 32.2% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (51) of the respondents satisfy the counseling programs provided in the company, 10 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 29 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the counselling programs provided in the company. 77
  78. 78. 4.1.19: Figure 19 Counselling programs for the employees: 78
  79. 79. 4.1.20: Table 20 Helping tendency of the employees by sharing their experience: 79
  80. 80. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 34 32 24 0 0 Percentage 37.8% 25.5% 26.7% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (34) of the respondents strongly satisfy that they are helped by other employees by sharing their experience in the company, 32 respondents satisfy the statement and 24 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents strongly satisfy that they are helped by other employees by sharing their experience in the company. 4.1.20: Figure 20 Helping tendency of the employees by sharing their experience: 80
  81. 81. 4.1.21: Table 21 Employee involvement in management decision: 81
  82. 82. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 33 50 7 0 0 Percentage 36.7% 55.5% 7.8% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (50) of the respondents satisfy that they are involved in the management decisions of the company, 33 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 7 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy that they are involved in the management decisions of the company. 4.1.21: Figure 21 82
  83. 83. Employee involvement in management decision: 4.1.22: Table 22 83
  84. 84. Recognition and acknowledgement of the employee in their work: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 30 57 3 0 0 Percentage 33.3% 63.4% 3.3% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (57) of the respondents satisfy that they are recognized and acknowledged in their work in the company, 30 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 3 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy that they are recognized and acknowledged in their work in the company. 84
  85. 85. 4.1.22: Figure 22 Recognition and acknowledgement of the employee in their work: 85
  86. 86. 4.1.23: Table 23 Employees overall satisfaction in their work: Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 27 54 9 0 0 Percentage 30% 60% 10% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (54) of the respondents satisfy that they are overall satisfied in their work, 27 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 9 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy that they overall satisfied in their work. 86
  87. 87. 4.1.23: Figure 23 Employees overall satisfaction in their work: 87
  88. 88. 4.1.24: Table 24 Satisfactory level of the welfare facility provided in the company for the employees: 88
  89. 89. Strongly satisfied Satisfied Average Dissatisfied Strongly dissatisfied Frequency 18 63 9 0 0 Percentage 20% 70% 10% 0% 0% Inference: The above table shows that the majority (63) of the respondents satisfy the overall welfare facility provided in the company, 18 respondents strongly satisfy the statement and 9 other respondents averagely satisfy the statement. This shows that most of the respondents satisfy the overall welfare measures provided in the company. 4.1.24: Figure 24 Satisfactory level of the welfare facility provided in the company to the employees: 89
  90. 90. 90
  91. 91. CHAPTER V FINDINGS, SUGGUESTIONS & CONCLUSION FINDINGS: • The data was collected equally among the gender, 45 male respondents and 45 female respondents. • Majority (33) of the respondents belong to the age group of 18-25age. 91
  92. 92. • Majority (49) of the respondents status are married. • Majority (40) of the respondents have their working experience below 5 years. • Majority (68) of the respondents are strongly satisfied in their working environment in the company. • Majority (57) of the respondents satisfy to the medical benefits to them and to their families of the company. • Majority (70) of the respondents satisfy that the working hour in the company is adoptable. • Majority (34) of the respondents moderately satisfy the recreation place provided in the company. • Majority (58) of the respondents satisfy the leave policy provided in the company . • Majority (50) of the respondents strongly satisfy the canteen service provided in the company. • Majority (55) of the respondents satisfy the rest room and lunch room facility provided in the company . • Majority (39) of the respondents satisfy that the maternity and the paternity leave provided in the company. • Majority (59) of the respondents satisfy the first aid procedures and safety measures provided in the company. • Majority (78) of the respondents satisfy the overall welfare activities provided in the company. • Majority (65) of the respondents strongly satisfy that their works are given according to their qualification in the company. • Majority (70) of the respondents strongly satisfy with their top management of their company. 92
  93. 93. • Majority (67) of the respondents satisfy that they are being paid fairly based on the work they do in the company. • Majority (41) of the respondents strongly satisfy that they are given the necessary authority to perform their duties effectively. • Majority (51) of the respondents satisfy that the company regularly organizes the counselling programs. • Majority (34) of the respondents strongly satisfy that they share their experience to help one another inside the company. • Majority (50) of the respondents satisfy that they are involved in the management decisions y the top management in the company. • Majority (57) of the respondents satisfy that they are recognized and acknowledged in their work. • Majority (54) of the respondents satisfy their job in the company. • Majority (63) of the respondents satisfy the welfare facilities provided in the company. • And this data also shows that there is flaw in the recreation place provided to the employees and also it shows that they are not give with necessary authority to perform their duties and also the counselling programs didn’t reach the employees efficiently. 93
  94. 94. SUGGESTIONS: o According to the data collected from the respondents it clearly shows that they have better working environment, medical benefits to them and to their families, working hours, leave policy, canteen service, restroom and lunch room facility, maternity and paternity leave and proper first aid procedures and safety measures o This shows that the employees are totally satisfied by the welfare measures provided in the company. o And also according to the data collected from the respondents clearly shows that they have no problem with their top management of the company as well as the salary provided to them for their work. o It also shows that they are given the work according to their qualifications and skills, and the employees are recognized and acknowledged in their work. o The employees in the company share their experience with one another to help themselves improve. o Employees are overall satisfied with their job in the company. 94
  95. 95. CONCLUSION This study explores the importance of welfare measures which leads to job satisfaction that helps in the structure of understanding the effects of the firm compensation practices of the employee force. And by identifying the areas, to take timely action to improve the welfare and satisfaction of the employees. Employee plays an important role in the industrial production of the company. From the study it is found that the Employee welfare facility has great impact on job satisfaction. The welfare measures should be tailored in such a way that it accomplishes the needs of the employees, if the needs of the employees are satisfied it will lead to the satisfaction of the employees which will automatically leads to increase in productivity of the company. It gives the feel of care to the employees that result in sincerity and loyalty of the employees towards the organization. Hence, the organization should cooperate with the employees in order to increase the production and to earn higher profits. Employee benefits constitute a pivotal role for the provision of income and security. It also helps in finding out the employees relationship with the management. 95
  96. 96. Employees are the pillars of the organization. They should be benefited by certain plans like pension plan, gratuity, children education, Insurance etc. The social evils prevalent among the employee such as substance abuse are reduced to a greater extent by the policies. BIBLIOGRAPHY:  L. M. Prasad-Human Resource Management  Dr. P.C Tripathi-Personal Management  Marketing Management by Philip Kotler  Dr. Radha-Organizational Behaviour  C.R. Kothari-Research methodology  Market Research by Tull and Hawkins  R.P. Vittal-Satiscal & Business Mathematics WEBLIOGARPHY:  www.tvsmotor.com/pdf/Financial-Results-March-2016.pdf 96
  97. 97.  "Sundaram Clayton Company History". Money control. 1 January 2005. Retrieved 28 September 2010.  The company also got over a period of labour unrest that required Chairman Venu Srinivasan to take tough measures to resurrect a company that was in a state of turmoil. He went on to invest in new technology, nurture in-house design and implement Toyota-style quality programs.  www.tvsapache.com/rr310/  www.thehindubusinessline.com/2002/11/03/stories/2002110301380200.htm  www.tvsmotor.com  Das, Swati (16 July 2004). "Warwick's doctorate to Venu Srinivasan". Times of India. Retrieved 2 August2010.  "Padma Shri for Venu Srinivasan". The Hindu BusinessLine. 25 January 2010. Archived from the original on 3 June 2010. Retrieved 2 August 2010  careerswithtvsm.tvsmotor.com  www.indeed.co.in/cmp/Tvs-Motor/reviews  www.tvsmotor.com/tvs-in-brief  www.glassdoor.co.in/Benefits/TVS-Motor-Company-India-Benefits- EI_IE313020.0,17_IL.18,23_IN115_IP2.htm  TVS Motor Company - Bikes in India, Bike Prices, New Bikes, Two Wheeler Manufacturer India, Motorcycles, 2 Wheelers".  The TVS Group  TVS group, TVS and Sons, T V Sundram Iyengar and Sons Limited”  www.ukessays.com/essays/marketing/tvs-motor-company-in-india  www.ukessays.com/essays/marketing/tvs-motor-company-in-india 97
  98. 98.  "Mitsubishi, sole agents for Valvoline car care products". Sunday Observer. 3 August 2003. Archived from the original on 11 October 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2010. “A STUDY ON JOB SATISAFACTION BASED ON THE WELFARE MEASURES PROVIDED IN TVS COMPANY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MADURAI” QUESTIONNAIRE: 98
  99. 99. Personal details: Name : Age : Gender : Marital status : If yes:- No of children : Qualification : Designation : Experience : How do you rate the following: (Welfare Measures) 1) Working environment: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 2) Medical benefits provided by the organisation for the employee and their families: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 3) Working hours of the organisation: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 4) Recreation place: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 5) Leave policy: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 99
  100. 100. 6) Canteen services: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 7) Rest room and lunch room facility: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 8) Maternity leave for the female employee: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 9) First aid procedures and safety measures: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied 10) Overall satisfaction with employee welfare activities: a) Highly satisfied b) satisfied c) average d) dissatisfied e) highly dissatisfied How do you rate the following (Job Satisfaction) 11) Is your work according to your qualification and skills? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 12) Is the employees are satisfied with the top management? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 13) Is the company provides satisfactory salary according to the work? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 14) Are the employees in the company having necessary authority to perform their duties effectively? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 15) Company organises counselling programs for the employees regularly? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 100
  101. 101. 16) Employees in the company share experience to help each other? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 17) Top management involves employees in the management decisions? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 18) Your company recognize and acknowledge your work? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 19) Rate your overall satisfaction with your job? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 20) Welfare facilities provided to the employees by the organisation are satisfactory? a) Strongly agree b) agree c) neutral d) disagree e) strongly disagree 101

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