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Keys to Student-
Centered Learning
Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate
Presented by: Ms. Rosabelle Mahinay
Getting to Know
3
Getting to Know
4
Our Generations Today
Getting to Know
5
Our Generations Today
• Setting high social and
academic expectations
• Creating school environments
focused on the needs of the
learner
6
Crea...
Definition by TeachThought.com
It is a process of learning that puts the needs of the students over the conveniences of pl...
Shifting roles for students:
• Student as teacher
• Student as collaborator
• Student as community member
Shifting roles f...
It is the prevailing attitudes,
standards, or environmental
conditions of a group,
period, or place.
CLIMATE
9
Creating a...
OUTPUT
10
Keys to Student-Centered Learning
December 14, 2020
Teachers
Technology
Student-Centered Approaches
11
We can trace out-of-control behaviors to a variety of factors:
• The physical and emotional climate of the child’s home an...
▪ Seek attention from peers or adults
▪ To attain power/control
▪ For revenge or retaliation
▪ Feels good/play
▪ Fear of F...
1. Classroom Rules
2. Classroom Schedule
3. Physical Space
4. Attention Signal
5. Beginning and Ending Routines
6. Student...
8. Make your rules describe behavior that is
measurable.
9. Assign consequences to breaking the rules.
10. Always include ...
Inappropriate Rules
❑ Be responsible
❑ Pay attention
❑ Do your best
❑ Be kind to others
❑ Respect authority
❑ Be polite
16...
▪ The best consequences are reasonable and logical
▪ A reasonable consequence is one that follows logically
from the behav...
▪ Aggressive (the hyperactive, agitated, unruly student)
▪ Resistant (the student who won’t work)
▪ Distractible (the stud...
The number one problem in the
classroom is not discipline; it is the
lack of procedures and routines.
19
Effective teachers introduce
rules, procedures, and routines
on the very first day of school
and continue to teach and
rei...
21
DISCIPLINE PROCEDURES ROUTINES
Concerns how students BEHAVE Concerns how things are DONE Concerns how things are DONE
H...
A smooth-running class is the
responsibility of the teacher,
and it is the result of the
teacher’s ability to teach
proced...
23
During Synchronous Class:
▪ How to enter the google meet
▪ What to do at the beginning of the class
▪ What to do when y...
1. EXCUSE yourself from what you are doing
2. RELAX. Take a slow relaxing breath and CALMLY approach
the student with a me...
6. If backtalk occurs, relax, wait and KEEP QUIET. If the student
wants to talk back, keep the first principle of dealing ...
26
7. When the student responds with the appropriate behavior
say, “Thank you,” and leave with an affirmative SMILE. If a
...
Goal: Students will feel welcome and will immediately go to their
seats and start on a productive task.
27
❑ Greet the stu...
Goal: Your procedures for ending the day/class will:
28
❑ Ensure that students will not leave the classroom
before they ha...
▪ Design efficient procedures for assigning,
monitoring, and collecting student work.
29
5 Major Areas of Managing Student...
30
▪ Piranha
▪ Catfish
▪ Goldfish
31
Piranha
▪ Are usually the “trouble-makers”
▪ Can be passive aggressive or
overtly aggressive
▪ Have negative attitude
▪...
32
Catfish
▪ Go with the flow
▪ Are usually good-natured, but have
limited motivation
▪ Are social beings
▪ Tend to cooper...
33
Goldfish
▪ Are in the top 10-15% of their class
▪ Are “teacher pleasers”
▪ Are highly motivated to perform well
▪ Show ...
1. Determine the learning styles of your students
2. Determine reading levels/skills of students
3. Inventory access to te...
▪ What do I want all students to know and be able to do at the
end of this lesson?
▪ What will I do to cause this learning...
✓ Lesson Content
✓ Learning Level
✓ Instructional Methods, Materials, Activities
✓ Student Activities
✓ Evaluation Tools, ...
Academic Focus
Instructional Strategies
Student Engagement
Writing Strategy
Reading Strategy
Technology Strategy
Assessmen...
38https://www.teachthought.com/p
edagogy/28-student-centered-
instructional-strategies/
39https://spencerauthor.com/stude
nt-ownership-projects/
40
▪ Fear of Failure
“Better to look bad, than stupid”. Safer not to try.
▪ Lack of Meaning
May not see relevance to assignme...
▪ Lack of Challenge
▪ Desire for Attention
Look helpless to teacher
▪ Peer Concern
Not cool to like school
▪ Low Expectati...
1. Vary Your Teaching Style
2. Relate Instruction to Student’s Interests
3. Give instructions relevant to Real World
4. Pr...
As a teacher, your personal interest in
students also can be demonstrated
by establishing and maintaining
rapport with the...
Rapport can be established by:
❑ listening actively,
❑ talking to students about topics that interest them,
❑ showing an i...
❑ greeting students by name,
❑ scheduling surprises for them,
❑ doing favors for them and allowing them to do things for y...
1. agree on unified expectations, rules, and procedures;
2. use wrap-around school- and community-based services and
inter...
5. offer a meaningful and interactive curriculum and a range of
individualized instructional strategies;
6. teach social s...
Teachers
Technology
Student-Centered Approaches
49
 Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate
50
• https://www2.slideshare.net/greenermango/creating-a-student-centered-learning-
climate
• https://www.teachthought.com/pe...
Keys to Student-Centered Learning (Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate)
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Keys to Student-Centered Learning
(Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate)

- Setting high social and academic expectations
- Creating school environments focused on the needs of the learner

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Keys to Student-Centered Learning (Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate)

  1. 1. Keys to Student- Centered Learning Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate Presented by: Ms. Rosabelle Mahinay
  2. 2. Getting to Know 3
  3. 3. Getting to Know 4 Our Generations Today
  4. 4. Getting to Know 5 Our Generations Today
  5. 5. • Setting high social and academic expectations • Creating school environments focused on the needs of the learner 6 Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate Seven (7) Domains for school leadership and management
  6. 6. Definition by TeachThought.com It is a process of learning that puts the needs of the students over the conveniences of planning, policy, and procedure. Like any phrase, “student-centered learning” is subjective and flexible – and only useful insofar as it ultimately supports the design of learning experiences for students. Definition by EducationEvolving.org It is the model that shifts from being adult-centered and standardized to student-centric and individualized. Specifically, the learning is personalized to the students’ unique needs, interests, and aspirations, and designed with their ideas and voices at the table. “ Students have a choice in their Learning ” Definition by EdGlossary.org refers to a wide variety of educational programs, learning experiences, instructional approaches, and academic-support strategies that are intended to address the distinct learning needs, interests, aspirations, or cultural backgrounds of individual students and groups of students. 7
  7. 7. Shifting roles for students: • Student as teacher • Student as collaborator • Student as community member Shifting roles for teachers: • Teacher as designer • Teacher as facilitator • Teacher as organizer “ Students have a choice in their Learning ” 8
  8. 8. It is the prevailing attitudes, standards, or environmental conditions of a group, period, or place. CLIMATE 9 Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate
  9. 9. OUTPUT 10 Keys to Student-Centered Learning December 14, 2020
  10. 10. Teachers Technology Student-Centered Approaches 11
  11. 11. We can trace out-of-control behaviors to a variety of factors: • The physical and emotional climate of the child’s home and neighborhood • The amount of stability and consistency in the child’s family • The parenting styles of the child’s parents • The power and influence of peers in a child’s life • The positive and negative role models available to the child • The child’s exposure to violent media • The child’s emotional and physical health • The child’s own attitude toward his/her anger 12 Dealing With Student Behavior in Today’s Classrooms
  12. 12. ▪ Seek attention from peers or adults ▪ To attain power/control ▪ For revenge or retaliation ▪ Feels good/play ▪ Fear of Failure ▪ Getting something (sensory input) ▪ Imitation / Learned Misbehavior ▪ Underlying Mental Health Issues 13
  13. 13. 1. Classroom Rules 2. Classroom Schedule 3. Physical Space 4. Attention Signal 5. Beginning and Ending Routines 6. Student Work 7. Classroom Management Plan 14
  14. 14. 8. Make your rules describe behavior that is measurable. 9. Assign consequences to breaking the rules. 10. Always include a “compliance rule”. 11. Keep the rules posted. 12. Consider having rules recited daily for first two weeks then periodically.. 15
  15. 15. Inappropriate Rules ❑ Be responsible ❑ Pay attention ❑ Do your best ❑ Be kind to others ❑ Respect authority ❑ Be polite 16 Preferred Rules ❑ Raise your hand and wait for permission to speak. ❑ Sit in your seat unless you have permission to leave it.
  16. 16. ▪ The best consequences are reasonable and logical ▪ A reasonable consequence is one that follows logically from the behavior rather than one that is arbitrarily imposed ▪ The best logical consequences teach the students to choose between acceptable and unacceptable actions. 17
  17. 17. ▪ Aggressive (the hyperactive, agitated, unruly student) ▪ Resistant (the student who won’t work) ▪ Distractible (the student who can’t concentrate) ▪ Dependent (the student who wants help all the time) 18
  18. 18. The number one problem in the classroom is not discipline; it is the lack of procedures and routines. 19
  19. 19. Effective teachers introduce rules, procedures, and routines on the very first day of school and continue to teach and reinforce them throughout the school year. 20
  20. 20. 21 DISCIPLINE PROCEDURES ROUTINES Concerns how students BEHAVE Concerns how things are DONE Concerns how things are DONE HAS penalties and rewards Have NO penalties or rewards Have NO penalties or rewards It dictates how the students should behave. It is how you want something done. It is the responsibility of the teacher to communicate effectively It is what the student does automatically without prompting or supervision. It becomes a habit, practice, or custom for the student.
  21. 21. A smooth-running class is the responsibility of the teacher, and it is the result of the teacher’s ability to teach procedures. 22
  22. 22. 23 During Synchronous Class: ▪ How to enter the google meet ▪ What to do at the beginning of the class ▪ What to do when you have a question ▪ What to do after the class During Asynchronous Class: ▪ What to do when you have a question ▪ Where to submit completed outputs ▪ How attendance is monitored
  23. 23. 1. EXCUSE yourself from what you are doing 2. RELAX. Take a slow relaxing breath and CALMLY approach the student with a meaningful look. 3. FACE the student directly and CALMLY wait for a response. 4. If there is no response, WHISPER the student’s first name and follow with what you want the student to do, ending with “please”. RELAX and WAIT. 5. If the student does not get to work, RELAX and WAIT. Repeat Step 4 if necessary. 24
  24. 24. 6. If backtalk occurs, relax, wait and KEEP QUIET. If the student wants to talk back, keep the first principle of dealing with backtalk in mind: IT TAKES ONE FOOL TO TALK BACK. IT TAKES TWO FOOLS TO MAKE A CONVERSTAION OUT OF IT. 25
  25. 25. 26 7. When the student responds with the appropriate behavior say, “Thank you,” and leave with an affirmative SMILE. If a student goes so far as to earn an office referral, you can deliver it just as well RELAXED. After all, ruining your composure and peace of mind does not enhance classroom management.
  26. 26. Goal: Students will feel welcome and will immediately go to their seats and start on a productive task. 27 ❑ Greet the students at the door. ❑ Have a task prepared for students to work on as they sit down. ❑ Do your “housekeeping”. ❑ Keep tasks short (3-5 min.) ❑ When you’ve finished, address the task.
  27. 27. Goal: Your procedures for ending the day/class will: 28 ❑ Ensure that students will not leave the classroom before they have organized their own materials and completed any necessary clean-up tasks. ❑ Ensure the you have enough time to give students both positive and corrective feedback, and to set a positive tone or parting prayer for ending the class.
  28. 28. ▪ Design efficient procedures for assigning, monitoring, and collecting student work. 29 5 Major Areas of Managing Student Work: ❖ Assigning Class Work and Homework ❖ Managing Independent Work Periods ❖ Collecting Completed Work ❖ Keeping Records and Providing Feedback ❖ Dealing with Late/Missing Assignments
  29. 29. 30 ▪ Piranha ▪ Catfish ▪ Goldfish
  30. 30. 31 Piranha ▪ Are usually the “trouble-makers” ▪ Can be passive aggressive or overtly aggressive ▪ Have negative attitude ▪ Have attendance problems ▪ Are “at risk”
  31. 31. 32 Catfish ▪ Go with the flow ▪ Are usually good-natured, but have limited motivation ▪ Are social beings ▪ Tend to cooperate; follow MOST rules ▪ Perform to the average or just enough to stay out of trouble with mom/dad
  32. 32. 33 Goldfish ▪ Are in the top 10-15% of their class ▪ Are “teacher pleasers” ▪ Are highly motivated to perform well ▪ Show enthusiasm for learning ▪ May be “over achievers” and /or high achievers
  33. 33. 1. Determine the learning styles of your students 2. Determine reading levels/skills of students 3. Inventory access to technology 4. Connect writing to what is being taught 5. Focus on academic expectations and core content 6. Establish a variety of instructional strategies 34
  34. 34. ▪ What do I want all students to know and be able to do at the end of this lesson? ▪ What will I do to cause this learning to happen? ▪ What will students do to facilitate this learning? ▪ How will I assess to find out if this learning happened? ▪ What will I do for those who show through assessment that the learning did not take place? 35
  35. 35. ✓ Lesson Content ✓ Learning Level ✓ Instructional Methods, Materials, Activities ✓ Student Activities ✓ Evaluation Tools, Strategies, Activities 36
  36. 36. Academic Focus Instructional Strategies Student Engagement Writing Strategy Reading Strategy Technology Strategy Assessment Strategy 37
  37. 37. 38https://www.teachthought.com/p edagogy/28-student-centered- instructional-strategies/
  38. 38. 39https://spencerauthor.com/stude nt-ownership-projects/
  39. 39. 40
  40. 40. ▪ Fear of Failure “Better to look bad, than stupid”. Safer not to try. ▪ Lack of Meaning May not see relevance to assignments. ▪ Emotional Distress Anxiety/Depression from influences at home. ▪ Learning Disability Give up in frustration. 41 Factors That Influence Motivation:
  41. 41. ▪ Lack of Challenge ▪ Desire for Attention Look helpless to teacher ▪ Peer Concern Not cool to like school ▪ Low Expectation No encouragement from home ▪ Expression of Anger Due to pressure from parents 42 Factors That Influence Motivation:
  42. 42. 1. Vary Your Teaching Style 2. Relate Instruction to Student’s Interests 3. Give instructions relevant to Real World 4. Provide Hands-on Activities 5. Apply “Meaningful Work” 6. Allow Student Some Control over What and How He Learns 7. Praise Student’s Efforts and Accomplishments 8. If Student is Too Cool, consider incentives, rewards, group recognition ( spark some competition) 9. Challenge the Students 43
  43. 43. As a teacher, your personal interest in students also can be demonstrated by establishing and maintaining rapport with them. 44
  44. 44. Rapport can be established by: ❑ listening actively, ❑ talking to students about topics that interest them, ❑ showing an interest in students’ personal lives, ❑ letting them know you missed them when they are absent ❑ and welcoming them back, ❑ sharing your own interests and stories, ❑ displaying empathy and giving emotional support, ❑ letting them perform activities in which they excel, 45
  45. 45. ❑ greeting students by name, ❑ scheduling surprises for them, ❑ doing favors for them and allowing them to do things for you, ❑ acknowledging their performance and behavior, ❑ participating in after-school activities with them, ❑ recognizing special events in students’ lives such as birthdays, ❑ displaying kindness, ❑ spending informal time with students, and ❑ complimenting them 46
  46. 46. 1. agree on unified expectations, rules, and procedures; 2. use wrap-around school- and community-based services and interventions; 3. create a caring, warm, and safe learning environment and community of support; 4. understand and address student diversity; 47
  47. 47. 5. offer a meaningful and interactive curriculum and a range of individualized instructional strategies; 6. teach social skills and self-control; and 7. evaluate the impact of the system on students, educators, families, and the community and revise it based on these data. 48
  48. 48. Teachers Technology Student-Centered Approaches 49  Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate
  49. 49. 50
  50. 50. • https://www2.slideshare.net/greenermango/creating-a-student-centered-learning- climate • https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/28-student-centered-instructional- strategies/ • https://resilienteducator.com/classroom-resources/student-centered-discussions/ • https://spencerauthor.com/student-ownership-projects/ 51

Keys to Student-Centered Learning (Creating a Student-Centered Learning Climate) - Setting high social and academic expectations - Creating school environments focused on the needs of the learner

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