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Micro teaching slide presentation

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Micro teaching slide presentation

  1. 1. AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO TEACHING Adapted from Surobhi Dutta
  2. 2. KWARA STATE UNIVERSITY, MALETE, NIGERIA The University for Community Development
  3. 3.  General Introduction  Origin and Development of Micro-Teaching  Goals of Micro-Teaching  General Objective of Micro-Teaching  Meaning and Definition of Micro-Teaching  Objectives of Micro-Teaching  Characteristics of Micro-Teaching  Steps of Micro-Teaching  Merits of Micro-Teaching  Limitations of Micro-Teaching  General Format  Presenter Information & Session  Audience Participation  Sharing Feedback & Criticism  Micro-Teaching Feedback Form  Observers’ Comments on the Teaching Session  Participants’ Reply to Observers’ Feedback
  4. 4.  Microteaching is a scaled-down, simulated teaching encounter designed for the training of both pre-service or in-service teachers.  It has been used worldwide since its invention at Stanford University  Its purpose is to provide teachers with the opportunity for the safe practice of an enlarged cluster of teaching skills while learning how to develop simple, single-concept lessons in any teaching subject.  Microteaching helps teachers improve both content and methods of teaching and develop specific teaching skills such as questioning, the use of examples and simple artefacts to make lessons more interesting, effective reinforcement techniques, and introducing and closing lessons effectively.  Immediate, focused feedback and encouragement, combined with the opportunity to practice the suggested improvements in the same training session, are the foundations of the microteaching protocol.
  5. 5.  The use of microteaching within teacher education is seen as an on-campus way of introducing pre-service teachers to the complexities of teaching and as a bridge that connects theory to practice (Pringle, Dawson, & Adams, 2003).  Throughout the years, various components have been changed or added to the format of on-campus microteaching performances.  Feedback for microteaching performances derived from videotape playback and clinical supervisors have been slowly replaced by oral and written feedback from course instructors and pre-service teacher candidates, especially with the financial and time constraints in many teacher education programs (Kpanja, 2001).  Presentations take about 15 minutes each (including presentation, feedback and transition time).
  6. 6.  The idea of micro-teaching originated for the first time at Stanford University in USA in the late 1950s by Dwight W. Allen, Robert Bush, and Kim Romney. .  They were assigned the development of testing and evaluation tools to measure the attainment of teaching skills.  This lead to the development of a systematic and accurate method of giving feedback to the teacher trainee.  All the steps of micro-teaching technique :Teach- Feedback-Replan-Reteach-Refeedback were formulated.
  7. 7.  To encourage participants to think more specifically about the goals of their teaching in terms of how students will learn the information presented. This involves thinking about teaching style as well as content.  To give participants specific suggestions regarding how their teaching styles are perceived by others both within and from outside specific disciplines.  To provide an opportunity to observe and evaluate other styles of teaching and to learn how to share observations constructively with others.
  8. 8.  The main objective of the micro-teaching session is to provide the participants with an environment for practice-based teaching to instil self-evaluative skills.
  9. 9.  Micro teaching is a procedure in which a student teacher practices teaching with a reduced number of pupils in a reduced period of time with emphasis on a narrow and specific teaching skill. Microteaching is a scaled- down teaching encounter in class size and time- D.W.Allen(1966)  Microteaching is defined as a system of controlled practice that makes it possible to concentrate on specified teaching behaviour and to practice teaching under controlled conditions. - D.W. Allen & A.W.Eve (1968)
  10. 10.  To enable teacher trainees to learn and assimilate new teaching skills under controlled conditions.  To enable teacher trainees to master a number of teaching skills.  To enable teacher trainees to gain confidence in teaching.
  11. 11.  Microteaching is a highly individualized training device  Microteaching is an experiment in the field of teacher education which has been incorporated in the teaching practice schedule  It is a student teaching skill training technique and not a teaching technique or method  Microteaching is micro in the sense that it scale down the complexities of real teaching  Practising one skill at a time  Reducing the class size to 5-10 pupils  Reducing the duration of lesson to 5-10 minutes  Limiting the content to a single concept
  12. 12.  Immediate feedback helps in improving, fixing and motivating learning  The students are provided immediate feedback in terms of peer group feedback, tape recorded/CCTV and Video  Microteaching advocates the choice and practice of one skill at a time  These sessions are usually conducted with a small group (5~ 10 presenters) from within a department. If there are fewer than three presenters from a department, their session will be combined with that of another department.
  13. 13. The Micro-teaching programme involves the following steps:  Step I- Particular skill to be practised is explained to the teacher trainees in terms of the purpose and components of the skill with suitable examples.  Step II -The teacher trainer gives the demonstration of the skill in Micro-teaching in simulated conditions to the teacher trainees.
  14. 14.  Step III- The teacher trainee plans a short lesson plan on the basis of the demonstrated skill for his/her practice.  Step IV- The teacher trainee teaches the lesson to a small group of pupils. His/Her lesson is supervised by the supervisor and peers.  Step V- On the basis of the observation of a lesson, the supervisor gives feedback to the teacher trainee.  The supervisor reinforces the instances of effective use of the skill and draws attention of the teacher trainee to the points where he/she could not do well.
  15. 15.  Step VI- In the light of the feed-back given by the supervisor, the teacher trainee re-plans the lesson plan in order to use the skill in more effective manner in the second trial.  Step VII -The revised lesson is taught to another comparable group of pupils.  Step VIII -The supervisor observes the re-teach lesson and gives re-feed back to the teacher trainee with convincing arguments and reasons.  Step IX –The teach, re-teach, cycle may be repeated several times till adequate mastery level is achieved
  16. 16.  It helps to develop and master important teaching skills.  It helps to accomplish specific teacher competencies.  It caters for individual differences of prospective teachers in their training.  It is more effective in modifying teacher behaviour.  It is an individualized training technique.  It employs real teaching situation for developing skills.  It reduces the complexity of teaching process as it is a scaled down teaching.  It helps to get deeper knowledge regarding the art of teaching.
  17. 17.  It is skill oriented; Content not emphasized.  A large number of trainees cannot be given the opportunity for re-teaching and re-planning.  It is a time consuming technique.  It requires special classroom setting.  It covers only a few specific skills.  It deviates from normal classroom teaching.  It may raise administrative problem while arranging micro lessons
  18. 18.  A scribe is appointed for each presentation.  A participant then gives a five-minute presentation, followed by ten minutes of feedback from the audience.  The scribe records the audience feedback, using the Micro-Teaching Group Session Feedback Sheet.  The scribe gives the completed Feedback Sheet to the presenter for his/her own reference.
  19. 19.  • Each participant prepares a five-minute mini-lecture on any topic.  The content is not crucial for this process. In fact, it is preferable to make a presentation of something outside the field, as colleagues can find themselves responding more vigorously to the content than to the effectiveness of communication.  If a department prefers presentation of discipline-specific material, then the presence of KWASU COE staff ensures that some of the feedback replicates the possible responses of non- specialists.  It is recommended that the time limit will be enforced to make sure that all participants have sufficient time.  Participants with audio-visual aids (e.g. overheads, LCD projectors.) must make their own arrangements with the Course Lecturer.
  20. 20.  Each participant should plan to begin the presentation with an explicit statement of goals for the presentation and the objectives by which they plan to achieve those goals. These goals can be written on a board, distributed on sheets for the audience, displayed on an overhead or slide, or stated at the beginning of the presentation.  Each presenter should consider:  the style as well as the content of your presentation.  the methodology of your presentation  special strategies you may need to accommodate students who are not experts in your discipline.
  21. 21.  Group members are expected to participate actively in other’s presentations.  They should write down any comments they would like to make during the feedback period.  Their comments should focus on evaluating how well the goals articulated by the presenter at the beginning of the talk have been fulfilled.  Group members can also comment on other aspects of the presentation that they may deem important.
  22. 22.  " Own" your messages State your reactions with "I" rather than "you" as audience reactions vary. By owning your own reactions, you allow for the possibility of different responses. (You might invite other reactions as well). Examples: "I appreciated the way you connected your speech to last week's class discussion." "I was confused when you said.... because..."  Be specific and concrete. While it might be nice to know that someone liked my introduction, it doesn't tell me very much. Instead, one could say, for example, "I liked the concrete illustrations of the theory X.", "I liked the way you included your own background and interest in the introduction."  Focus on presentation behaviour, not on personality characteristics and judgments. For example, say "I would have liked more eye contact" rather than "It's clear you're really not interested in us since you never look at us."  Also, limit comments to behaviours that are changeable. Distracting gestures can be brought under control. Calling attention to a stutter, however, is probably not helpful in a public setting.
  23. 23.  • Distinguish between observations, inferences, and judgments. All of these have some role in evaluation but they are quite different.  Observations have to do with what we see and hear; inferences and conclusions we reach based on those observations and judgments and/or evaluative response.  Listeners observe differently, and, more important, draw different inferences and judgments from what they see and hear. Therefore, start by reporting your observations and then explain what you inferred from them.  Speakers can hear a great deal of feedback on observations. Inferences and judgments are better received when the observations they are based on are clear. For example, “I noticed that you made eye contact with the students, which made me feel that you were genuinely trying to engage their attention”.  • Balance positive and negative comments. Try to emphasize the positive aspects of a presentation which the presenter can build upon constructively in the future to improve his/her style.  • Invite feedback from a variety of listeners.
  24. 24.  Question for the participant before the session 1. Are there any specific aspects of the teaching session that you would like the observers to focus on? 2. What is the anticipated context for this teaching session (course type, year level, class size)? What changes, if any, would you make to the room to best suit the class context?  Question for the participant after the session 1. What are your reflections on the teaching session?  Observers’ ideas in response to the participant’s input on Questions1 & 2
  25. 25.  Notes: 1. Were the expected learning outcomes (ELOs) for the session clear? Did the session directly address the ELOs? 2. How did the presentation style support the development of ideas, the relationships among those ideas, and their significance? 3. Was engagement demonstrated, and in what ways? 4. How was the review and closing? 5. Was assessment used to examine the extent to which the expected learning outcomes had been achieved?
  26. 26.  Notes: Key recommendations  1. What is the single most important thing that the participant can do to make the next session even better?  2. What have I learnt from this experience that that is worthwhile?

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