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Introduction to Human Resource
Management
Presented by-
Sreelakshmi Nair MBA/10002/15
Shipra Shresth MBA/10004/15
Navneet ...
EVOLUTION OF PERSONAL
MANAGEMENT AND HRM
Personal Management
Managing personnel is the process of
making sure the employees are as
productive as they can be. This...
Human Resource Management
 “Human” represents the dimension of HRM which relates
to the soft aspects such as commitment o...
 Human resource management (HRM, or simply HR)
is the management of an organization's workforce,
or human resources.
 In...
Difference between personal and
hrm
DIMENSION PERSONAL
MANAGEMENT
HRM
APPROACH TRADITIONAL MODERN
FOCUS ON PERSONAL
ADMINISTRATION,
EMPLOYEE WELFARE
&LABOR RE...
Evolution & Growth of Personal
Management
FIRST WORLD WAR
 The First World War accelerated change in the
development of personnel management, with women
being recr...
1920’S
 During the 1920s, jobs with the titles of ‘labor manager’
or ‘employment manager’ came into being in the
engineer...
1930’S
 During the 1930s, with the economy beginning to pick up,
big corporations in these newer sectors saw value in
imp...
 In 1920-30s emphasis is on welfare management and
paternalistic concept
 Status is of clerical level
 Roles played are...
SECOND WORLD WAR
 The Second World War brought about welfare and
personnel work on a full-time basis at all establishment...
 By 1945, employment management and welfare work had
become integrated under the broad term ‘personnel
management’. Exper...
 In 1940-60s emphasis on expanding the role to cover
labour , welfare, industrial relation and personal
administrator
 S...
 1990 onwards emphasis was on incremental productivity
gain through humanizer
 Status is proactive and growth oriented
...
Evolution of Human Resource
Management
Evolution of HRM:
 Industrial Revolution
 Trade Unionism
 Social responsibility era
 Scientific Management Era
 Human...
Industrial revolution
The seed of HRM were sown during Industrial revolution
1850’s in Western Europe and USA.The wind gra...
Trade Unionism:-
This was the period when state intervention to protect the
worker’s interest was felt necessary. During t...
These activities of trade unions gave rise to
personnel practices such as:-
 Collective bargaining
 Grievances redrassal...
Social Responsibility era:-
 Robert Owen, a British industrialist is considered to be the
first to adopt humanistic and p...
His philosophy was that owner is like a father and
worker is like a child. He practised the following:-
 Provision for re...
Scientific Management era:-
This concept was introduced by Fredrick.W.Taylor in
USA early in 20th century. He developed fo...
 Clear cut division of work and responsibility between
management and workers.
 Harmonious relations and close cooperati...
He developed following techniques for the same:-
 Time study
 Motion study
 Standardization of tools, equipments and ma...
Human Relations era:-
This particular period focused on the feelings,attitude and
needs of the workers as human beings.Bet...
Between 1924 to 1932,Elton Mayo conducted a series of
experiments at hawthorne plant of western electric company
in USA. M...
Behavioural science era:-
It was concerned with social and psychological aspects of
human behaviour. Some of important ele...
Systems approach era:
 Technical subsystem : formal relationships.
 Social subsystem : informal group relations
 Power ...
Contingency approach era:-
 According to contingency, the best way to manage varies
with situation.
 There may not be th...
Concepts Of HRM
 Earlier known as personnel management
 Administration of human
 Recruitment and selection,reward,grievance
handling,re...
 HRM is a process in which human resources are
recruited and mobalised in such a way that it helps in
achieving the organ...
 Acquisition,development,motivation and maintenance
of human resources.
 Acquisition: getting people
 Development: prep...
Growth Of HRM
 THE COMMODITY CONCEPT
 THE FACTOR OF PRODUCTION CONCEPT
 THE GOODWILL CONCEPT
 THE PATERNALISTIC CONCEP...
The Commodity Concept
 Human resource was referred as “a commodity”
 To be bought and sold,
 Use and throw.
 Wages wer...
The Factor of Production Concept
 Labour is treated as any other factor of production,
viz:money,material,land,etc
 Fact...
The Goodwill Concept
 Welfare measures like safety, first aid, lunch room, rest
room etc.
 These measures proved to be a...
The Paternalistic Concept
 Management must assume a fatherly and protective
attitude towards employees.
 It does not mea...
The Humanitarian Concept
 To improve the productivity,physical,social and
psychological needs of workers must be fulfille...
The Human Resource Concept
 Employees are the most valuable assets of an
organization.
 Convey the organizational goals ...
The Emerging Concept
 Enhance the quality of work life.
 Achieve Profitability, productivity, innovation and
excellence.
Significance of HRM
Human resources are the valuable assets of the
corporate bodies. they are their strength. to face the
...
Organizational significance
 It contributes to the achievement of organizational
objectives.
 attracting and retaining t...
Social significance
 Need satisfaction of personnel.
 Welfare of the society.
 Employment opportunities multiply.
 Con...
Professional significance
 Providing a healthy environment to employees.
 By meeting challenge of their job.
 Promoting...
Miscellaneous
 Recruitment and training.
 Performance appraisal.
 Managing disputes.
 Developing public relations.
 F...
Principles of Human Resource
Management
• Principles are fundamental beliefs, generally
constant and unchangeable.
• The p...
Principles of HRM is designed to:
 Provide an enabling set of standards to guide
managers in making decisions about manag...
Principles of HRM
 Merit
 Fairness
 Diversity
 Equity
 Reasonableness
 Transparency
 Natural Justice
 Public Inter...
Merit
 The principle of merit means that decisions about
appointments and pay are based on an unbiased
assessment of one’...
Fairness
 Fairness refers to conduct that is unbiased, just and
honest.
 It means treating employees consistently.
 The...
Diversity
 Diversity recognises that people have
characteristics that make then distinct from
others, including:
*Age *La...
Equity
 Means applying the principles of justice to correct or
supplement employment practices to redress
disadvantages e...
Reasonableness
 Means conduct which is sensible, in moderation and based
on sound judgement
 The principle of reasonable...
Transparency
 Refers to policies that are clear, frank and accessible
 Also refers to conduct being free from pretence o...
Natural Justice
 Natural justice means that all administrative
procedures are fair and are perceived to be fair
because d...
Public Interest
 Public Interest is served when all actions and
decisions of public officials and managers are based
on m...
A course or principle of action adopted or
proposed by an organization or individual
Equal Employment Opportunity policies...
 Communication with employees
 Communication with managers and
supervisors
 Time Savings
 Curbing litigation
Bamboo Wacom
 78 percent of HR professionals surveyed HRIS users
noting that they use their system to generate reports of...
Thank You
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Module 1 Introduction to HRM

Introduction of HRM
growth policies and practices of hrm

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Module 1 Introduction to HRM

  1. 1. Introduction to Human Resource Management Presented by- Sreelakshmi Nair MBA/10002/15 Shipra Shresth MBA/10004/15 Navneet Kumar MBA/10001/15 Priyamvada Ankita Lal MBA/10003/15
  2. 2. EVOLUTION OF PERSONAL MANAGEMENT AND HRM
  3. 3. Personal Management Managing personnel is the process of making sure the employees are as productive as they can be. This can include hiring, firing, or transferring people to/from jobs they can do most productively.
  4. 4. Human Resource Management  “Human” represents the dimension of HRM which relates to the soft aspects such as commitment of employees through participation and the most important assets being the employees.  “Resource” represents the hard aspects such as the strategy link of HRM and the importance of efficient utilization of employees.  “Management” represents the role of HRM as part of management that implies that it’s not only an administrative function that carries out the formulated policies but also a managerial function that contributes to strategy formulation.
  5. 5.  Human resource management (HRM, or simply HR) is the management of an organization's workforce, or human resources.  In circumstances where employees desire and are legally authorized to hold a collective bargaining agreement, HR will also serve as the company's primary liaison with the employees' representatives (usually a labour union).
  6. 6. Difference between personal and hrm
  7. 7. DIMENSION PERSONAL MANAGEMENT HRM APPROACH TRADITIONAL MODERN FOCUS ON PERSONAL ADMINISTRATION, EMPLOYEE WELFARE &LABOR RELATION ACQUISTION, DEVELOPMENT, MOTIVATION& MAINTAINANCE OF HR ASSUMPTION PEOPLE AS INPUT VALUABLE RESOURCE JOB DESIGN DIVISION OF LABOUR TEAM WORK TRAINING &DEVELOPMENT LESS MORE DECISION MAKING TOP MANAGEMENT MADE COLLECTIVELY EMPHASIS ON INCREASED PRODUCTION & SATISFIED EMPLOYEES EFFECTIVENESS,CULTURE, PRODUCTIVITY& EMPLOYEE PARTIFICATION CONCERNED WITH PERSONAL MANAGER ALL LEVEL OF MANAGERS FUNCTION ROUTINE STRATEGIC
  8. 8. Evolution & Growth of Personal Management
  9. 9. FIRST WORLD WAR  The First World War accelerated change in the development of personnel management, with women being recruited in large numbers to fill the gaps left by men going to fight, which in turn meant reaching agreement with trade unions (often after bitter disputes) about ‘dilution’– accepting unskilled women into craftsmen’s jobs and changing manning levels.
  10. 10. 1920’S  During the 1920s, jobs with the titles of ‘labor manager’ or ‘employment manager’ came into being in the engineering industry and other industries where there were large factories, to handle absence, recruitment, dismissal and queries over bonuses and so on.  Employers’ federations, particularly in engineering and shipbuilding, negotiated national pay rates with the unions, but there were local and district variations and there was plenty of scope for disputes.
  11. 11. 1930’S  During the 1930s, with the economy beginning to pick up, big corporations in these newer sectors saw value in improving employee benefits as a way of recruiting, retaining and motivating employees.  But older industries such as textiles, mining and shipbuilding which were hit by the worldwide recession did not adopt new techniques, seeing no need to do so because they had no difficulty in recruiting labor.
  12. 12.  In 1920-30s emphasis is on welfare management and paternalistic concept  Status is of clerical level  Roles played are of welfare administrator and policeman
  13. 13. SECOND WORLD WAR  The Second World War brought about welfare and personnel work on a full-time basis at all establishments producing war materials because an expanded Ministry of Labor and National Service insisted on it, just as the Government had insisted on welfare workers in munitions factories in the previous conflict.  The government saw specialist personnel management as part of the drive for greater efficiency and the number of people in the personnel function grew substantially; there were around 5,300 in 1943.
  14. 14.  By 1945, employment management and welfare work had become integrated under the broad term ‘personnel management’. Experience of the war had shown that output and productivity could be influenced by employment policies.  The role of the personnel function in wartime had been largely that of implementing the rules demanded by large- scale, state-governed production, and thus the image of an emerging profession was very much a bureaucratic one.  Following the development of poor industrial relations during the 1960s a Royal Commission under Lord Donovan was set up.
  15. 15.  In 1940-60s emphasis on expanding the role to cover labour , welfare, industrial relation and personal administrator  Status is of administrator  Roles played are of appraisal, advisor, mediator, legal advisor & firefighting  In 1970-80s the focus was on efficiency , effectiveness of production. The emphasis was on human values, aspirators, dignity and usefulness  Status was developmental  Roles played by personal manager was of integrator, trainer and educator
  16. 16.  1990 onwards emphasis was on incremental productivity gain through humanizer  Status is proactive and growth oriented  Roles played is of developer ,councillor ,coach, mentor, philosopher, facilitator and problem solver
  17. 17. Evolution of Human Resource Management
  18. 18. Evolution of HRM:  Industrial Revolution  Trade Unionism  Social responsibility era  Scientific Management Era  Human Relations Era  Behavioural Science Era  System Approach Era  Contingency Approach Era
  19. 19. Industrial revolution The seed of HRM were sown during Industrial revolution 1850’s in Western Europe and USA.The wind gradually reached to India in beginning of 20th century.During this period:-  Machines were bought in  Technology made rapid progress  Workers were treated like machine tools  Employers were keen to meet production targets rather than satisfy workers.  Govt. didi very little to protect the interests of workers.
  20. 20. Trade Unionism:- This was the period when state intervention to protect the worker’s interest was felt necessary. During this period:-  Workers started to form their associations.  Trade Union Act, 1926 was passed in India. The basic philosophy was to safeguard worker’s interest and to sort out their problems like Child labour, Long hours of work, Poor working conditions. The unions used strikes, lockouts etc as weapons for acceptance of their problems.
  21. 21. These activities of trade unions gave rise to personnel practices such as:-  Collective bargaining  Grievances redrassal  Arbritration  Employee benefits programs  Installation of rational wage structures.
  22. 22. Social Responsibility era:-  Robert Owen, a British industrialist is considered to be the first to adopt humanistic and paternalistic approach.  He viewed that the social and economic environment influence the physical , mental and psychological development of workers.
  23. 23. His philosophy was that owner is like a father and worker is like a child. He practised the following:-  Provision for reduced working hours  Housing facilities  Education of workers and their children  He admired for giving human treatment to workers.
  24. 24. Scientific Management era:- This concept was introduced by Fredrick.W.Taylor in USA early in 20th century. He developed following four principles:-  Use of scientific methods in setting work standards.  Scientific selection and placement of workers best suited for the tasks. Also provision for training.
  25. 25.  Clear cut division of work and responsibility between management and workers.  Harmonious relations and close cooperation with workers. His study focused physical characteristics of the human body as it responds to routine and clearly defined jobs.
  26. 26. He developed following techniques for the same:-  Time study  Motion study  Standardization of tools, equipments and machinery and working conditions  incentive wage plan with differential piece rate of wages.
  27. 27. Human Relations era:- This particular period focused on the feelings,attitude and needs of the workers as human beings.Between 1925 and 1935 Hugo Munsterberg, a psychologist suggested the use of psychology in selection, placement, testing and training the employees in an organisation.
  28. 28. Between 1924 to 1932,Elton Mayo conducted a series of experiments at hawthorne plant of western electric company in USA. Main findings were:-  Physical environment should be good  Favourable attitudes of workers and work team towards their work  Fulfillment of worker’s social and psychological needs  Workers can be motivated through job security, right to express their opinion on matters related to them.
  29. 29. Behavioural science era:- It was concerned with social and psychological aspects of human behaviour. Some of important elements were:-  Individual behaviour is linked with group behaviour  Informal leadership rather than formal leadership  Motivation by self control and self development  Improving efficiency through Self operating
  30. 30. Systems approach era:  Technical subsystem : formal relationships.  Social subsystem : informal group relations  Power subsystem : exercise of power
  31. 31. Contingency approach era:-  According to contingency, the best way to manage varies with situation.  There may not be the universal way of managing all the situations.  It is imperative for managers to analyse different situations and then use the best suitable in that particular situation.
  32. 32. Concepts Of HRM
  33. 33.  Earlier known as personnel management  Administration of human  Recruitment and selection,reward,grievance handling,retirement and so forth  Developed in the bureaucratic set up  Organisation and administration of man power
  34. 34.  HRM is a process in which human resources are recruited and mobalised in such a way that it helps in achieving the organisational objectives.  Management of human energies and competencies.  Right man,for the right position and at the right time in the changing environment.
  35. 35.  Acquisition,development,motivation and maintenance of human resources.  Acquisition: getting people  Development: preparing them for work  Motivation: activating them  Maintenance: keeping them retained in the organization.
  36. 36. Growth Of HRM  THE COMMODITY CONCEPT  THE FACTOR OF PRODUCTION CONCEPT  THE GOODWILL CONCEPT  THE PATERNALISTIC CONCEPT  THE HUMANITARIAN CONCEPT  THE HUMAN RESOURCE CONCEPT  THE EMERGING CONCEPT
  37. 37. The Commodity Concept  Human resource was referred as “a commodity”  To be bought and sold,  Use and throw.  Wages were decided on the basis of demand and supply forces,  Or the time they worked for.  Government did not care much about the work force.
  38. 38. The Factor of Production Concept  Labour is treated as any other factor of production, viz:money,material,land,etc  Factors of production may also refer specifically to the primary factors, which are land, labour, and capital goods applied to production.  Materials and energy are considered secondary factors in classical economics because they are obtained from land, labour and capital.
  39. 39. The Goodwill Concept  Welfare measures like safety, first aid, lunch room, rest room etc.  These measures proved to be a source of boosting up the morale of workers,  Thereby enhancing their performance.  Focus on labour productivity.
  40. 40. The Paternalistic Concept  Management must assume a fatherly and protective attitude towards employees.  It does not mean merely providing benefits but it signifies to satisfy various needs of employees just as parents meet the requirements of children.
  41. 41. The Humanitarian Concept  To improve the productivity,physical,social and psychological needs of workers must be fulfilled.  Their viewpoints were heard respected.  Money is less a factor in determining output, than group standards, incentives and securities.  The organization is a social system that has both economic and social dimensions.
  42. 42. The Human Resource Concept  Employees are the most valuable assets of an organization.  Convey the organizational goals to the employees  There should be a conscious effort to realize organizational goals by satisfying needs and aspirations of employees.
  43. 43. The Emerging Concept  Enhance the quality of work life.  Achieve Profitability, productivity, innovation and excellence.
  44. 44. Significance of HRM Human resources are the valuable assets of the corporate bodies. they are their strength. to face the new challenges on the fronts of knowledge, technology and changing trends in global economy needs effective HRM.
  45. 45. Organizational significance  It contributes to the achievement of organizational objectives.  attracting and retaining the best people.  Development of skills and attitude.  Securing willing cooperation.  Effective utilization of available human resources.  A team of competent and dedicated employees.
  46. 46. Social significance  Need satisfaction of personnel.  Welfare of the society.  Employment opportunities multiply.  Conservation of physical and mental health.  Scarce talents are put to best use.
  47. 47. Professional significance  Providing a healthy environment to employees.  By meeting challenge of their job.  Promoting team-work and team-spirit.  Offering excellent growth opportunities.  Incentives for developing and utilizing creativity.
  48. 48. Miscellaneous  Recruitment and training.  Performance appraisal.  Managing disputes.  Developing public relations.  Future manpower needs.  Coping with change.  Uncertainty reduction.
  49. 49. Principles of Human Resource Management • Principles are fundamental beliefs, generally constant and unchangeable. • The principles of human resource management are touchstones which enable managers to exercise judgement in a variety of situation.
  50. 50. Principles of HRM is designed to:  Provide an enabling set of standards to guide managers in making decisions about managing the people in their organisations  Provide a source for all corporate policies related to human resource management  Provide managers with a principles-based approach to managing people
  51. 51. Principles of HRM  Merit  Fairness  Diversity  Equity  Reasonableness  Transparency  Natural Justice  Public Interest
  52. 52. Merit  The principle of merit means that decisions about appointments and pay are based on an unbiased assessment of one’s competencies. Example : Knowledge, Skills and abilities
  53. 53. Fairness  Fairness refers to conduct that is unbiased, just and honest.  It means treating employees consistently.  The principle of fairness, enshrined in The Labour Relations Act, 1998, is fundamental to employees relations.
  54. 54. Diversity  Diversity recognises that people have characteristics that make then distinct from others, including: *Age *Language *Culture *Ethnicity *Skills *Gender *Abilities *Talents *Perspectives
  55. 55. Equity  Means applying the principles of justice to correct or supplement employment practices to redress disadvantages experienced by individuals in the workplace
  56. 56. Reasonableness  Means conduct which is sensible, in moderation and based on sound judgement  The principle of reasonableness is a key concept in The Labour Relations Act, 1998
  57. 57. Transparency  Refers to policies that are clear, frank and accessible  Also refers to conduct being free from pretence or deceit
  58. 58. Natural Justice  Natural justice means that all administrative procedures are fair and are perceived to be fair because due process has been followed  The rules of natural justice are the minimum standards of fair decision-making imposed on persons or bodies acting in a judicial capacity
  59. 59. Public Interest  Public Interest is served when all actions and decisions of public officials and managers are based on merit, fairness and reasonable consideration of the public’s need for service, efficiency, effectiveness, representation and access to information and opportunities.  This principle is fundamental to The Civil Service Act.
  60. 60. A course or principle of action adopted or proposed by an organization or individual Equal Employment Opportunity policies Employee classifications Workdays, paydays, and pay advances Overtime compensation Meal periods and break periods Payroll deductions Vacation policies Holidays Sick days and personal leave Performance evaluations and salary increases Performance improvement Termination policies
  61. 61.  Communication with employees  Communication with managers and supervisors  Time Savings  Curbing litigation
  62. 62. Bamboo Wacom  78 percent of HR professionals surveyed HRIS users noting that they use their system to generate reports of strategic and demographic employee data  68 percent of surveyed payroll management HRIS users reporting that their system is used to process payroll in their businesses HRIS
  63. 63. Thank You

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