Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

Aged Care Models - SF

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 9 Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Ähnlich wie Aged Care Models - SF (20)

Anzeige

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

Aged Care Models - SF

  1. 1. Exploring New Models of Care 14th September 2016 Sunnyville,California HealthXL Summary Report
  2. 2. Increasing costs and limited resources in hospital systems around the world are driving the need to revaluate the methods for delivery of healthcare services to people. HealthXL, together with Plug&Play and our partner Johnson & Johnson, were delighted to be joined by 20 healthcare professionals, industry experts and innovators for a workshop to discuss how new models of care can be devised through collaboration to address the increasing pressures on healthcare access and delivery. The workshop in Plug&Play, Sunnyvale forms part of a global program where the HealthXL community in Singapore, California and Melbourne are examining the challenges and opportunities that exist to redefine patient access to both acute care but also drive prevention promotion. We initiated the workshop by highlighting work that providers are undertaking to change the access patients have to crucial healthcare services. SutterHealth, University of Mississippi Medical Center and Schlon Klinic brought the group through their respective organizations efforts in this area and highlighted some pain points they are experiencing facilitating the transition of care. After hearing from the providers, the group brainstormed opportunities for transition of care, heard from Roni Zeiger of Smart Patients after which they prioritised what the patient would want in a new model of care and ideated around the minimal viable product required to begin the transformation in their chosen area facilitated by HealthXL. The primary theme that emerged from our collective discussions was - empowering the patient to have more control over their health and access to medical care.
  3. 3. Attendees Alexandra Castillo UMMC Lucia Soares Johnson & Johnson Ruchita Sinha GE Ventures Peter Whitehead SISU Health Xiaoxu Kang Kangaroo Health Kathy Doran Johnson & Johnson Gregg Ringold Careskore Leslie Musshafen UMMC Chris Jaeger Sutter Health Theo Lau AARP Jo Ann Swasey Johnson & Johnson Roni Zeiger Smart Patients Michael Dillhyon YouBase Shawn Leavitt Comcast Lowinn Kibbey Johnson & Johnson Terrence Hibbert UMMC Alexander Grunewald Johnson & Johnson Alexander Hauenschild Schoen Klinik Cheryl Lejbolle UnitedHealthcare Jonathan Kipp Comcast Margy Drumheller AARP
  4. 4. Key Areas where Opportunity for New Models of Care exist In working groups, the participants laid out what they believed were the top opportunities to change the status quo, and move the delivery of care from an acute-led service to a community or home-based care delivery. • In-home care for elderly e.g. Remote monitoring, care services from community nurses • Chronic disease management e.g. Patients with diabetes Depression/mental health services – access to quality services and treatments outside of hospitals • Health Management Optimization e.g. effective referrals, triaging Barriers & Frustrations for Clinical Providers With technology maturing that is capable of delivering the opportunities, we discussed with out clinical providers what their top frustrations and barriers were for delivery of new models of care. • Difficulty in proving out cost-savings • Existing across two billing worlds • Fee for service • Value-based payments • Technology infrastructure • Rural communities and connectivity to them • Skewed incentives for progressive care models • Health literacy of communities Barriers & Frustrations for Clinical Providers
  5. 5. A patient’s perspective - What matters to me? Roni Zeiger, CEO of Smart Patients, delivered an excellent patient viewpoint for the attendees to consider. Regardless of the location and person whom delivers the care, what are the most important factors that need to be front and centre in a solution are features that meet the fundamental needs and wants of a patient. To often buzzword descriptions for what appears desirable rather than reality are banded and accepted. Patient-centred care is often one of those terms, therefore the participants were challenges to define “Patient-Centred-Care” and share what they believed to be a examples of this care description. Definition 1 Through conversation and partnership with healthcare professionals – the outcomes of care and success is prioritized by the patient and guided by the professional Definition 2 Personalised care, that is not financially motivated. An exceptional experience that meets the needs of the patients Definition 3 Care that empowers the patient, connecting them with both doctors and peers to design a care program that meets their reality and avoids redundancies. From buzzword to reality for patient-centred care
  6. 6. The Challenge for Tomorrow The problems and solutions, raised and discussed by the workshop participants are complex, there is no magic bullet or single point solution to deliver the utopia of low-cost, non-acute based healthcare. However – for every journey there must be a starting point, so each working group was challenged to design an experiment they could start the next day (budget $300,000) to begin working on a new model of care. Challenge 1 To help people living with diabetes define realistic health outcomes and then help them execute them. Challenge 2 In-home care for seniors, a house of the future, equipped to allow real-time engagement and communications for occupants with community of care providers. Challenge 3 Collaborate with trusted community/social groups in the community, to reduce health risks (hypertension/stroke) in lower socio-economic sectors. As an entire group – the priority as given to Challenge 3 – collaborations between care providers and communities to deliver new models of care. Reaching all sectors of society via trusted channels to reduce health risks such as strokes, hypertension and diabetes.
  7. 7. Workshop Learnings Across a number of clinical providers present there was shared frustrations and barriers as to why it is difficult to move from acute-led services to more community based care. Alignment is needed from administration, payors, industry and physicians to drive the change required. Patient-centred care requires decision-making led by the patient and guided by the physician and wider healthcare professional communities. The needs AND wants of patients needs to be front and centre of decisions taken for care. To deliver new models of care to all sectors of society, there is a need to explore new collaborations with non-traditional groups such as religious, social and sporting clubs. Leveraging the already trusted relationships to drive change in lifestyles and reduce health risks. Next Steps Taking the proposed challenges raised by the workshop participants HealthXL will prepare a report on digital health solutions that exist that could potentially address some solution required. HealthXL invite all workshop participants to join us in Basel (21st Feb 2017), where we will bring our global community together, presenting the summary of the workshops and how digital technology is playing a role in addressing the Challenges raised.
  8. 8. Meet the HealthXL Community A number of solutions are currently operating in the market which may support some of the issues and barriers raised at the workshop. Below HealthXL have included a shortlist of companies addressing some of the issues. Sense.ly, a virtual nurse platform for personalized follow up care with a strong focus on chronic conditions. Automated risk assessment allowing clinicians to triage patients. Baylon Health, a telemedicine solution that combines AI & remote care. A subscription-based remote GP consultation service. “check” function triages patients automatically before they talk to a GP Jaga-Me is a platform for patients and their families to access professional home nursing and caregiving services in Singapore at home, on-demand. The Twine Collaborative Care Platform helps patients build self- efficacy via support from coaches/clinicians. Twine has demonstrated that their platform contributed to improved outcomes for diabetic patients. Akili are building clinically-validated cognitive therapeutics, assessments, and diagnostics that feel like video games that will be deployed remotely directly to patients anywhere, prescribed and tracked by physicians.
  9. 9. Bloomberg meets LinkedIn for digital health The HealthXL Platform brings together key market stakeholders in digital health, and empowers them to collaborate and learn from each other • Gain global coverage of market intelligence for innovative high growth companies • Access shared strategic learnings from market thought leaders • Close the loop for new collaborative projects, bringing together customers, solutions, funders and precise expertise HealthXL Members: Join today

×