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4 intranet publishing models

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Last week, I ran a workshop at Intranatverk with an enthusiastic group of intranet people to cover what is the best publishing model for their intranet. The slides I used for the workshop are available for you to share.

I took this subject from my book ‘Digital success or digital disaster?‘ j.mp/MMDigitalSuccess which covers all the other areas of intranet governance you need to develop when improving how your intranet is managed.

The publishing model you choose needs to meet your organisation’s needs. It also needs to fit within a wider governance framework that includes your publishing roles and responsibilities, standards, and support.

4 intranet publishing models

  1. 1. Governance Hierarchy: How roles can help to govern your intranet Owner, Champion, and Steering Group Intranet Manager Intranet Team Content Owners and Editors Intranet Users 4 intranet publishing models for good governance Mark Morrell Intranet Pioneer and author of…
  2. 2. Publishing models for different requirements •Flexible approach on who is responsible for publishing, updating and managing the content •Third parties will normally publish and manage content on a day-to-day basis •Content owner or editor is responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content •Central team responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content Centralised Decentralised HybridOutsourced
  3. 3. Publishing model factors • Type of organisation your intranet will be supporting: o Small o Dynamic o Large o Complex • Culture will help you choose a model to meet strategic aims • How you manage all your intranet content and applications • How your governance framework needs to operate • How you will improve your publishing and user experiences
  4. 4. Publishing models for different requirements •Flexible approach on who is responsible for publishing, updating and managing the content •Third parties will normally publish and manage content on a day-to-day basis •Content owner or editor is responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content •Central team responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content Centralised Decentralised HybridOutsourced
  5. 5. Centralised: strengths • You can set right direction and monitor progress. Strategy coordination is strong. • You can make changes to your governance quickly. • Your training costs are minimal with small team to publish. You train people quickly so they become productive. • Knowledge shared easily across a small team. • Shared understanding of how governance supports publishing and user experiences.
  6. 6. Centralised: weaknesses • May quickly outgrow this model if organisation expands from a small number of tightly knit people in one location to many. • Increasingly difficult to know everyone risking delays. • Frustration between content owners and central team. • New people mean new ideas on how the strategy and governance could be improved which central team may resist. • Growing risk of being isolated and detached from changing needs of business areas/functions as organisation expands.
  7. 7. Publishing models for different requirements •Flexible approach on who is responsible for publishing, updating and managing the content •Third parties will normally publish and manage content on a day-to-day basis •Content owner or editor is responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content •Central team responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content Centralised Decentralised HybridOutsourced
  8. 8. Decentralised: strengths • Helps you separate day-to-day publishing needs from strategic and governance responsibilities. • You are able to manage the look and feel of your intranet design using publishing templates and governance features. • No need for content owners to spend time designing or have high technical skills to use templates. • Content owner is responsible for publishing, updating and managing the content. • Compliance with publishing standards will be your core team’s responsibility to check and inform content owners.
  9. 9. Decentralised: weaknesses • You, your core team, and business area/ function representatives may not agree on strategy and governance priorities. • Delays, wasted effort, and conflicting approaches pursued, cause confusion and poor user experience. • Your organisation may not see the intranet contributing to its key priorities or adding any value. • It may want to review intranet’s purpose, strategy, governance framework, publishing model, and roles and responsibilities. • Risk your team communicates and coordinates in a confused or fragmented way. Aims of core team and publishers may conflict.
  10. 10. Publishing models for different requirements •Flexible approach on who is responsible for publishing, updating and managing the content •Third parties will normally publish and manage content on a day-to-day basis •Content owner or editor is responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content •Central team responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content Centralised Decentralised HybridOutsourced
  11. 11. Outsourced: strengths • There can be significant cost savings made by outsourcing the publishing and managing of your intranet’s content. • Possible to improve speed of publishing with rigorous service level agreement covering publishing speed & content quality. • Dedicated team of outsourced people helps, developing an understanding about how your organisation’s custom and practices and language used (acronyms, etc.).
  12. 12. Outsourced: weaknesses • Expected savings may not always be achievable with extra costs, previously hidden, included in contract. • It may take longer to do the same activity, removing savings. • There may be more errors, adding hidden costs, with delays in the publishing or lowering of the content’s quality. • Goodwill between people within organisation may disappear with service level agreement. • You may outsource more than is needed. If contract stopped prematurely it may cause extra costs not budgeted for.
  13. 13. Publishing models for different requirements •Flexible approach on who is responsible for publishing, updating and managing the content •Third parties will normally publish and manage content on a day-to-day basis •Content owner or editor is responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content •Central team responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content Centralised Decentralised HybridOutsourced
  14. 14. Hybrid: strengths • Gives opportunity to test out and combine approaches before adopting publishing model that works best. • Helps prevent the unnecessary extra costs that would come if you took an approach that has major problems. • Working with your core team, business representatives, and content owners and editors help to adopt right approach. • With goodwill from everyone, it helps to ensure the overall publishing and user experience is consistent and strong.
  15. 15. Hybrid: weaknesses • Risk of testing different approaches is that the overall strategic direction for your intranet may be overlooked. • Pragmatic approach risks delays to critical areas needing urgent attention and action. • Your approach may need consensus. Some things will never be agreeable to everyone. Organisations are not democratic. • May open up divisions that have an impact on other ways you manage your intranet or the direction it is moving in. • May create a fragmented experience as you adopt each phase
  16. 16. Which publishing model is best for you? •Flexible approach on who is responsible for publishing, updating and managing the content •Third parties will normally publish and manage content on a day-to-day basis •Content owner or editor is responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content •Central team responsible for publishing, updating, and managing the content Centralised Decentralised HybridOutsourced
  17. 17. Centralised is best for A smaller organisation that is stable in size and culture or an organisation using an intranet for the first time.
  18. 18. Decentralised is best for An organisation based in many locations. It is large enough to support a core team with business area and business function representatives to manage the intranet. You should consider a decentralised publishing model for a digital workspace, benefiting from its extended reach and added complexity.
  19. 19. Outsourcing is best for An organisation that has budget challenges and a mature intranet is more suited to outsourcing its activities. The outsourcing will normally cover the publishing and managing of content on a day-to-day basis. It rarely covers the strategy or purpose of the governance framework.
  20. 20. Hybrid is best for An organisation that has a culture where the direction is set from its centre and accepted after consultation is more suited to a hybrid version of a publishing model that is adapted to meet your requirements
  21. 21. Thank you Blog: intranet-pioneer.com Twi er: @markmorrell Email: mark@intranet- pioneer.com Book: h p://j.mp/ MMDigitalSuccess

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