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Who is the Digital Historian?

Talk at British Library Labs Roadshow, Liverpool John Moores University, 22 March 2017

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Who is the Digital Historian?

  1. 1. Who is the Digital Historian? BL Labs Roadshow, LJMU, March 2017 slideshare.net/drjwbaker James Baker Lecturer in Digital History/Archives @j_w_baker james.baker@sussex.ac.uk This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Exceptions: quotations, embeds from external sources, logos, and marked images.
  2. 2. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk You don’t need to be a digital historian
  3. 3. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Lincoln Mullen, Computational Historical Thinking: With Applications in R (2017): http://dh- r.lincolnmullen.com
  4. 4. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Rudy, Kathryn. ‘Dirty Books: Quantifying Patterns of Use in Medieval Manuscripts Using a Densitometer’ . Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art 2, no. 1–2 (June 2010). doi:10.5092/jh na.2010.2.1.1
  5. 5. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Wall, John. ‘Virtual Pauls Cross Project: A Digital Re-Creation of John Donnes’ Gunpower Day Sermon’, 2013. https://vpcp.chass.ncsu.edu/.
  6. 6. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Finley, Will. Making an Impression: Book Illustration and their Technologies, 1780- 1850. Phd Thesis, University of Sheffield. Forthcoming 2017.
  7. 7. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Hitchcock, Tim, and William J. Turkel. ‘The Old Bailey Proceedings, 1674–1913: Text Mining for Evidence of Court Behavior’. Law and History Review, August 2016, 1–27. doi:10.1017/S073 8248016000304. Distribution of trial lengths in words for “killing” displayed as red circles; all other trials are displayed as gray dots. “Killing” includes all trials tagged for the offenses of “infanticide,” “murder,” “petty treason,” “manslaughter,” and “killing: other,” by the Old Bailey online.
  8. 8. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk You don’t need to be a digital historian But you do need to be a little critical digital
  9. 9. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Year 1 Digital History at Sussex
  10. 10. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Autumn 1. What is History / What is Art History 2. Reading History / Reading Art History 3. Library 4. Archives 5. History on the Web I: Search and Retrieval 7. History on the Web II: History in Public 8. Referencing 9. Zotero 10. Counting History I (theory) 11. Counting History II (practice) 12. Being a Historian in the Digital Age Spring 1. Doing Digital History 2. Foundations: data types and data fields 3. Making historical data I (theory) 4. Making historical data II (practice: getting data) 5. Making historical data III (practice: cleaning data) 6. Visualising historical data I (theory) 7. Visualising historical data II (practice: graphs) 8. Visualising historical data III (practice: maps) 10. Storing and preserving historical data 11. Sharing historical data Year 1 Digital History at Sussex Baker, James. ‘Fostering Digital History: Integrating Digital Research Skills into an Undergraduate History Curriculum’, 1 October 2016. http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/66712
  11. 11. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk You don’t need to be a digital historian But if you aren’t then researching the 1990s will be tricky
  12. 12. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Until relatively recently records were tangible – often boxes of papers, photographs and maps. This is no longer the case. Now we have digital records, which not only comprise written or intelligible content but also intangible bits, data and code. National Archives. ‘Digital Strategy’, January 2017. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/the-national-archives-digital- strategy-2017-19.pdf
  13. 13. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Archival practice hinges on the tangibility of the physical record and a thoroughly established record keeping tradition. Digital records are very different. Records are not just documents. National Archives. ‘Digital Strategy’, January 2017. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/the-national-archives-digital- strategy-2017-19.pdf
  14. 14. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk xkcd. Old Files, 2015. https://xkcd.com/1360/. Methods that were creaking with digitised documents... Hitchcock, Tim. ‘Confronting the Digital: Or How Academic History Writing Lost the Plot’. Cultural and Social History 10, no. 1 (2013): 9– 23. doi:10.2752/147800413X13515292098070. ...won’t work for born- digital documents
  15. 15. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk
  16. 16. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Laura Carroll, Erika Farr, Peter Hornsby, and Ben Ranker. ‘A Comprehensive Approach to Born-Digital Archives’. Archivaria 72 (2 December 2011)
  17. 17. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Mar 6 08:33:42 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[852]: <info> Policy set 'Wired connection 1' (eth0) as default for IPv4 routing and DNS. Mar 6 08:33:42 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[852]: <info> Writing DNS information to /sbin/resolvconf Mar 6 08:33:42 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 dnsmasq[3507]: setting upstream servers from DBus Mar 6 08:33:42 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 dnsmasq[3507]: using nameserver 139.184.32.26#53 IP 139.184.32.26 is University of Sussex. So at 08:30 on 6 March 2017 I was at work. Wired means I was probably in my office.
  18. 18. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Mar 6 12:24:52 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 dnsmasq[3507]: using nameserver 139.184.32.27#53 Mar 6 12:24:52 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 dnsmasq[3507]: using nameserver 139.184.32.28#53 Mar 6 12:24:52 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[852]: <info> (wlan0): roamed from BSSID 00:0C:E6:5A:B2:3D (eduroam) to 00:0C:E6:5A:C1:09 (eduroam) IP 139.184.32.27 is University of Sussex. So at 12:24 on 6 March 2017 I was still at work. Eduroam suggets somewhere else on campus.
  19. 19. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Mar 14 10:22:15 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[827]: <info> address 192.168.0.9 Mar 14 10:22:15 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[827]: <info> prefix 24 (255.255.255.0) Mar 14 10:22:15 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[827]: <info> gateway 192.168.0.1 Mar 14 10:22:15 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[827]: <info> nameserver '192.168.0.1' Mar 14 10:22:15 bakers-RV420-RV520-RV720-E3530-S3530-E3420-E3520 NetworkManager[827]: <info> domain name 'Home' IP 192.168.0.1 is a generic home router. So at 10:22 on 14 March I was likely at home. Though this would be harder to pin down.
  20. 20. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Image from Milligan, Ian. ‘Finding Community in the Ruins of GeoCities: Distantly Reading a Web Archive’. Bulletin of IEEE Technical Committee on Digital Libraries 11, no. 2 (2015). http://www.ieee- tcdl.org/Bulletin/v11n2/pa pers/milligan.pdf. See also Brügger, Niels, and Ralph Schroeder, eds. The Web as History. London: UCL Press, 2017.
  21. 21. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Gaining access to someone else's computer is [..] like finding a master key to their house, with the freedom to open the cabinets, cupboards, and desk drawers, to peek at family photo albums, to see what's recently been playing on the stereo or TV, even to sift through what's been left behind in the trash Kirschenbaum, Matthew G. Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing, 2016. 215.
  22. 22. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk [We] must be conversant in the antiquarian cants of vanished operating systems, file formats, and emulators, just as we expect an early modernist doing book history to know something of signatures and collation formulas Kirschenbaum, Matthew G. Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing, 2016. 233.
  23. 23. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Windows 95 (1995) https://archive.org/details/win3_W95DEMO spsman69, Windows 95 PC (6 April 2013) https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=Ge9UqHKlaNU
  24. 24. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk Windows 3.11 (1992) https://archive.org/details/win3_stock Bingocat, Using Windows 3.11 for the First Time! (5 May 2016) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zk4c12DcrBg
  25. 25. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk A GeoCities diary on your browser: http://wayback.archive.org/web/20000622112212/http://www.ge ocities.com/TheTropics/Cabana/1516/diary.html A GeoCities diary on old Internet Explorer: http://oldweb.today/ie4/20010314115631/http://www.geocities.c om/TheTropics/Cabana/1516/diary.html A GeoCities diary on old Mac Netscape: http://oldweb.today/nsmac3/20010303110059/http://www.geociti es.com/TheTropics/Cabana/1516/diary.html
  26. 26. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk You don’t need to be a digital historian But we do need: Historians who are confident working with digital data To foster critical digital To inspire students and citizens To start asking more questions that aren’t yoked to paper
  27. 27. Who is the Digital Historian? BL Labs Roadshow, LJMU, March 2017 slideshare.net/drjwbaker James Baker Lecturer in Digital History/Archives @j_w_baker james.baker@sussex.ac.uk This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Exceptions: quotations, embeds from external sources, logos, and marked images.
  28. 28. @j_w_baker -- james.baker@sussex.ac.uk

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