Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.

The State of Open Access in USA | Ensuring Quality

1

Teilen

Wird geladen in …3
×
1 von 33
1 von 33

The State of Open Access in USA | Ensuring Quality

1

Teilen

Herunterladen, um offline zu lesen

A presentation made to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration’s Office of Science & Engineering Laboratories on the current state of open access in the United States and how DOAJ is tackling issues of quality in open access publishing

A presentation made to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration’s Office of Science & Engineering Laboratories on the current state of open access in the United States and how DOAJ is tackling issues of quality in open access publishing

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Weitere von DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals)

Ähnliche Bücher

Kostenlos mit einer 14-tägigen Testversion von Scribd

Alle anzeigen

Ähnliche Hörbücher

Kostenlos mit einer 14-tägigen Testversion von Scribd

Alle anzeigen

The State of Open Access in USA | Ensuring Quality

  1. 1. The State of Open Access; Ensuring Quality Dom Mitchell Community Manager dom@doaj.org DALS /OSEL Information Session 28 April 2015
  2. 2. 2 Overview  The State of Open Access  What is the DOAJ?  What is our aim?  Browsing and Searching  Our metadata  Ensuring quality  Volunteer for us
  3. 3. 3 The State of OA “After a decade of often fierce debate over whether the public should have free access to the scientific papers produced by their tax dollars, advocates for so-called open access celebrated a notable victory last month: The National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a plan to require its grantees to make their research freely available. NSF's move meant that the federal agencies that provide the bulk of the nation's basic and applied research funding have now complied with a 2013 White House order to make the peer- reviewed papers they fund freely available within 12 months of publication.” Science Magazine, April 10 http://www.sciencemag.org/content/348/6231/167.full
  4. 4. 4 The story began...  In 1991...
  5. 5. 5 Picture by gambit http://www.comicvine.com/profile/gambit474/
  6. 6. 6 The story began...  In 1991, the world's first free scientific online archive is created: arXiv.org http://arxiv.org/  In 1997, the NLM makes Medline freely available as PubMed: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed  Three cornerstones of open access: − In 2002 the Budapest Open Access Initiative is signed by 'leaders of the open access initiative'. http://www.budapestopenaccessinitiative.org/participants − In Apr 2003, the Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing is signed by representatives in North America. http://legacy.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/bethesda.htm − In Oct 2003, the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities is created.
  7. 7. 7 Today...  The concept of open access to knowledge and research has spread its wings...
  8. 8. 8 Today...  Of 1.1 million articles included in a study in 2014, 80% were available in some open access format Laakso, M. (2014). Green open access policies of scholarly journal publishers: a study of what,when, and where self- archiving is allowed. Scientometrics. In press.http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-013-1205-3  In a study of Scopus, open access journals made up only 12% of all journals David J. Solomon, Mikael Laakso, Bo-Christer Björk, Journal of Informetrics Volume 7, Issue 3, July 2013, Pages 642–650  In 1,370 journals that published 100,697 articles in 2010, the average APC was 906 US Dollars (USD) calculated over journals A study of open access journals using article processing charges. David J. Solomon, Bo-Christer Björk, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Volume 63, Issue 8, pages 1485–1495, August 2012  Follow the Dramatic Growth of Open Access series of blog posts by Heather Morrison
  9. 9. 9 In The USA  In April 2008, NIH's policy for 'mandated' open access to publicly funded research came into effect.  In 2012, the NIH announced it would enforce its Public Access Policy by blocking the renewal of grant funds to authors who don't follow the policy  Petition requesting free access to research gathers 64000 signatures in 2012 https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/response/increasing-public-access-results-scientific-research  3rd time lucky: the White House (OSTP) announces an open access policy in 2013 http://blogs.nature.com/news/2013/02/us-white-house-announces-open-access-policy.html 
  10. 10. 10 What does this mean for you?  Funded research: may be mandated that a copy be available in an open access repository such as PubmedCentral  You can choose whether to publish in a wholly open access journal or a journal that offers paid open access options (Gold OA)  Many traditional publishers offer hybrid journals that allow a mixture of open access and closed access options  You can also make a copy of your paper available in a [institutional] repository: self-archiving (Green OA).
  11. 11. 11 What does this mean for the researcher?  It's a minefield! − Publishers cash in on Gold OA − Dense, unclear licensing terms with conflicting copyright terms − Author services: depositing copies but which copy? − Complicated subscription models with different embargoes  Watch out! Gold OA model is abused: spam; scams; fake journals, articles, editorial boards; no peer review; poor quality
  12. 12. 12 What is DOAJ?  A curated database listing high quality, peer-reviewed open access journals  No hybrid journals  A whitelist not a blacklist  Journals from ALL disciplines & all languages  A hub for the collection & distribution of metadata to 3rd parties  Developed & hosted on standards-based, open-source software by Cottage Labs (www.cottagelabs.com)
  13. 13. 13 As of March 2015
  14. 14. 14 As of March 2015
  15. 15. 15 What is our aim?  To be the starting point for all searches for open access journals or articles  To increase awareness around open access issues  To increase visibility and awareness of quality open access journals − Online: social media, online learning environments, collaboration spaces − Offline: in the labs, in the libraries, conferences,
  16. 16. 16 What is our aim?  To increase our transparency through regular comms:  DOAJ News Service http://doajournals.wordpress.com  Public consultations  Social media @doajplus
  17. 17. 18 Browse by subject
  18. 18. 19 Advanced Search
  19. 19. 20 Advanced Search - journals
  20. 20. 21 Search results - journals http://doaj.org/faq#thetick
  21. 21. 22 Search results - journals
  22. 22. 23 Advanced Search – articles
  23. 23. 24 Our metadata  Uploaded by the publishers  Freely available to use, reuse, copy, distribute in accordance with our Creative Commons license (CC BY-SA).  Available via the following methods: − Downloadable CSV file − Spidering/crawling (Major search engines; Google Scholar) − OAI-PMH − OpenURL  All major aggregators, library databases, journal databases.
  24. 24. 25 Ensuring Quality  DOAJ's new application form focusses on 3 different themes: − Quality − Openness − The delivery or technical quality  Publishers must provide answers to 55 compulsory questions to be indexed  Applications are reviewed and assessed using a
  25. 25. 26 DOAJ Application Form
  26. 26. 27 Ensuring Quality  It is impossible to measure the quality of a journal or its publishing program  DOAJ uses standards, best practices and industry- recognised tools to build a picture  9500 journals in DOAJ will reapply to remain indexed  The DOAJ Seal shows exceptional best practice and adherence to standards  We encourage the use of DOI, archiving and preservation, Creative Commons licenses, ISSNs, non-restrictive copyright, open access
  27. 27. 28 Ensuring Quality  Unfortunately journals disappear, links rot, journals change publishers, formats become redundant  The community (librarians, aggregators, users) informs us when it finds broken links or incorrect information. http://www.loc.gov/aba/pcc/conser/issues/Open-Access-Project.html  Ensuring the quality of peer-review is
  28. 28. 29  October 2013  February 2014 – not just a problem with open access Ensuring quality
  29. 29. 30 Ensuring quality http://retractionwatch.com/
  30. 30. 31  BUT interest groups are coming together to tackle this problem  Communities are getting involved with open access  DOAJ uses a crowdsourcing model: we have over 155 volunteers reviewing journals and applications  We are always looking for volunteers, especially multi-lingual ones: find out more and apply! Open access: open to everyone
  31. 31. 32 Thanks to all the Consortia, Universities, Libraries and Publishers, and to our Sponsors for their support http://doaj.org/supportDoaj
  32. 32. 33 and Thank you! dom@doaj.org

×