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Facilitating expert peer editing groups

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Facilitating expert peer editing groups

  1. 1. Lehigh University TESOL Conference Ms. Candice Quiñones March 7, 2012
  2. 2. Overview   Research: Peer Editing, Cooperative Learning  Objective: Expert Editors  Creating Expert Editors  Possible Adaptations  Workshop
  3. 3. Research: Peer Editing   “Several studies have found peer editing to be at least as effective as teacher editing”(Topping & Ehly 119)  Peer assessment:  …involves increased time on task: thinking, comparing, contrasting, and communicating” (Topping 254).  “…makes available swifter feedback in greater quantity” (Topping 255).
  4. 4. Research: Cooperative Learning   Cooperative Learning  “The instructional use of small groups in which students work together to maximize their own and each other’s learning”(Johnson & Johnson 73).
  5. 5. Cooperative Learning   Three types:  Formal Cooperative Learning  Informal Cooperative Learning  Cooperative Base Groups* *I use mainly cooperative base groups. Source: Johnson & Johnson
  6. 6. Cooperative Learning   Things that make it work:  Positive interdependence  Individual accountability  Face-to-face interaction promoting each other  Appropriate use of social skills  Periodic processing of how to improve group effectiveness Source: Johnson & Johnson
  7. 7. Objective: Expert Editors  My goals:  To create a way to actively engage my students in their peer editing groups  Teach them to peer edit more effectively  Help them become better self-editors in the process
  8. 8. Creating Expert Editors  Some key elements to expert editing:  Be familiar with the assignment content  Focus on one thing at a time  Keep track of “favorite errors”  Look at a variety of versions  Seek feedback from others
  9. 9. Facilitating Expert Editing Groups   Stability – Group members should not change  Group Size  3-5 students  Group Roles  Create specific roles and descriptions for each role  Provide materials and resources to assist with roles  Rotation of Roles  Create a schedule that rotates the roles on a regular basis.
  10. 10. How It Works: Groups  ENGL 3 & 5 Classes  Currently: 16 students  Number of Groups: 4  Members per Group: 4  Total number of Roles: 4  Type of Group: Cooperative Base Groups  These groups are assigned in the beginning of the semester and will not change.
  11. 11. How It Works: Roles   Current # of Roles: 4  Organization Guru  Content Editor  Flow Master  Mechanic  Adaptations:  For groups of 3, unite Organization and Flow into one role.  For groups of 5, split the mechanic’s role.
  12. 12. How It Works: Rotation   During the semester, there are 4 major assignments.  Each student is assigned/choses one role per assignment.  The goal is to have performed each role by the end of the semester.  Adaptations:  Use Formal Cooperative Groups instead of Cooperative Base groups.  You will have to determine the time period for which each student will perform each role.
  13. 13. How It Works: In Class   First, an overview and explanation of each role’s task is given and the assignment is discussed.  Then, students are assigned to each role’s task.  Provide a handout with a “checklist” and list of resources for each role.  In groups, students exchange papers and review their peer’s work from only their role’s perspective.  They are also to perform their role for their own paper.
  14. 14. How It Works: Beyond   Peer-editing may take place several times during the writing and revision process of a paper.  Students are also encouraged to continue their roles using an online forum for peer editing.
  15. 15. How It Works: Assessment   Students are graded individually for their papers, but they are required to turn in all drafts.  This evidence of prewriting and revision is factored into the final grade (5%).  Adaptations:  Grade individual and group efforts (giving and receiving feedback).  Test them on the roles.
  16. 16. Your Turn  Prepare to be grouped, given an explanation of the assignment and roles, assigned roles, and provided with samples of student writing to evaluate.
  17. 17. The Assignment   The examples provided were drafts of an analytical essay about territorial behavior at Lehigh.  The points were to be based/selected from an essay they were assigned to read  Reading: “Territorial Behavior” by Desmond Morris.  Purpose: to analyze Lehigh based on what the reading text explained.  (The purpose is not to validate Morris’s thesis.)
  18. 18. Roles   Organization Guru  Content Editor  Flow Master  Mechanic
  19. 19. Organization Guru  to structure: The key question here relates  Does the essay have a recognizable structure that is logically organized?  Is there a recognizable introduction?  Does the essay have a thesis?  Are the body paragraphs organized in the order specified by the thesis?  Do the sentences within the paragraphs have a logical arrangement?  Is there a conclusion?
  20. 20. Content Editor   Does the essay fulfill the prescribed requirements for that type of writing? Is it on topic? (Tip: Check the assignment.)  I.E. If the assignment was to write an analysis, does it analyze something?  If the assignment required you to do research and use references, are references included?
  21. 21. Content Editor (Cont.)   Once you have determined that the essay is on topic, ask these questions:  Does the introduction have a good hook and thesis?  Are the body paragraphs limited to just one topic?  Are there enough details in the body paragraphs?  Does the author revisit the main points from the thesis in the conclusion?
  22. 22. Flow Master   The main things to consider with flow or fluency are:  Does the writer transition well between sentences, paragraphs and ideas?  Do they use proper transition words where necessary?  Can you read smoothly without having to stop or go back for clarification?  Do they tie their ideas together smoothly?
  23. 23. Mechanic (in general)   The key to this is knowing proper grammar and punctuation rules:  Read sentence by sentence.  Check individually for:  Spelling, capitalization, punctuation, verb tenses, subject-verb agreement, parallelism, article use, pronoun references, ambiguous or incorrect word choice and word order (among other things)  You will also be in charge of checking citations to see that they are done properly
  24. 24. Practice Time  Please let me know if you have any questions.
  25. 25. References  Johnson, David W. and Roger T. Johnson. “Making Cooperative Learning Work.” Theory into Practice 38.2 (1999): 67-73. JSTOR. Web. 5 March 2012. Topping, Keith J., and Steward W. Ehly. “Peer Assisted Learning: A Framework for Consultation.” Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation 12.2 (2001): 113-132. Google Scholar. Web. 6 March 2012. Topping, Keith. “Peer Assessment between Students in Colleges and Universities.” Review of Educational Research 68.3 (1998): 249-276. JSTOR. Web. 5 March 2012.
  26. 26. Presenter Information Candice Quiñones, ESL Lecturer at Lehigh University Email: cjq208@lehigh.edu 

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