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WT19: An Amazing Lightning Transition in Review

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WT19: An Amazing Lightning Transition in Review

  1. 1. An Amazing Lightning Transition In Review Navigating hurdles to get you onto the right platform – today! Consultant, Slalom December 18, 2019 David Aaron White
  2. 2. Forward Looking Statement Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This presentation contains forward-looking statements about the company’s financial and operating results, which may include expected GAAP and non-GAAP financial and other operating and non-operating results, including revenue, net income, diluted earnings per share, operating cash flow growth, operating margin improvement, expected revenue growth, expected current remaining performance obligation growth, expected tax rates, the one-time accounting non-cash charge that was incurred in connection with the Salesforce.org combination; stock- based compensation expenses, amortization of purchased intangibles, shares outstanding, market growth and sustainability goals. The achievement or success of the matters covered by such forward-looking statements involves risks, uncertainties and assumptions. If any such risks or uncertainties materialize or if any of the assumptions prove incorrect, the company’s results could differ materially from the results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements we make. The risks and uncertainties referred to above include -- but are not limited to -- risks associated with the effect of general economic and market conditions; the impact of geopolitical events; the impact of foreign currency exchange rate and interest rate fluctuations on our results; our business strategy and our plan to build our business, including our strategy to be the leading provider of enterprise cloud computing applications and platforms; the pace of change and innovation in enterprise cloud computing services; the seasonal nature of our sales cycles; the competitive nature of the market in which we participate; our international expansion strategy; the demands on our personnel and infrastructure resulting from significant growth in our customer base and operations, including as a result of acquisitions; our service performance and security, including the resources and costs required to avoid unanticipated downtime and prevent, detect and remediate potential security breaches; the expenses associated with new data centers and third-party infrastructure providers; additional data center capacity; real estate and office facilities space; our operating results and cash flows; new services and product features, including any efforts to expand our services beyond the CRM market; our strategy of acquiring or making investments in complementary businesses, joint ventures, services, technologies and intellectual property rights; the performance and fair value of our investments in complementary businesses through our strategic investment portfolio; our ability to realize the benefits from strategic partnerships, joint ventures and investments; the impact of future gains or losses from our strategic investment portfolio, including gains or losses from overall market conditions that may affect the publicly traded companies within the company's strategic investment portfolio; our ability to execute our business plans; our ability to successfully integrate acquired businesses and technologies, including delays related to the integration of Tableau due to regulatory review by the United Kingdom Competition and Markets Authority; our ability to continue to grow unearned revenue and remaining performance obligation; our ability to protect our intellectual property rights; our ability to develop our brands; our reliance on third-party hardware, software and platform providers; our dependency on the development and maintenance of the infrastructure of the Internet; the effect of evolving domestic and foreign government regulations, including those related to the provision of services on the Internet, those related to accessing the Internet, and those addressing data privacy, cross-border data transfers and import and export controls; the valuation of our deferred tax assets and the release of related valuation allowances; the potential availability of additional tax assets in the future; the impact of new accounting pronouncements and tax laws; uncertainties affecting our ability to estimate our tax rate; the impact of expensing stock options and other equity awards; the sufficiency of our capital resources; factors related to our outstanding debt, revolving credit facility, term loan and loan associated with 50 Fremont; compliance with our debt covenants and lease obligations; current and potential litigation involving us; and the impact of climate change. Further information on these and other factors that could affect the company’s financial results is included in the reports on Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K and in other filings it makes with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time. These documents are available on the SEC Filings section of the Investor Information section of the company’s website at www.salesforce.com/investor. Salesforce.com, inc. assumes no obligation and does not intend to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.
  3. 3. 30 Seconds About Me • Consultant at Slalom, D.C. • Specializing in Lightning Migrations • Columbia, MD User Group Contributor • Sales background • Creative Writing major • Part-time dog-sitter Hold me to it!
  4. 4. Why Lightning Critical updates are pushing even more users into Lightning • Beginning in January 2020, any Lightning-Enabled users of yours will be defaulted into Lightning every Sunday Lightning continues to provide improvements over Classic: • Intuitive page design providing users with the information they need in as little time as possible • Dynamic Record Forms, currently in its pilot state, which allow you to fully configure custom objects’ fields via the Lightning App Builder • Activity Timeline to organize tasks and events into an easily followed narrative • Opportunity Kanban board, providing your sales team with a simple way to sort their upcoming deals Don’t miss out on Salesforce’s newest features by sticking with Classic! If you (or your customers) haven’t heard already….
  5. 5. Scenario: Bank Wants to Move to Lightning • Client has a heavily customized Service Cloud org with several Visualforce pages, external integrations, and a complex schema • System has over 200 total Salesforce users spread across 9 distinct business units, each with its own app and business processes • Stakeholders’ primary objectives are: 1. Convert the org’s users to the Lightning Service Console without any net loss in functionality from Classic 2. Take advantage of Lightning’s out-of-the-box capabilities to immediately improve the org Real original Dave, talk about a bank in NYC…
  6. 6. Salesforce Solution Architect Leads Discovery and requirements gathering sessions with the client’s internal users and project stakeholders. Configures Salesforce to the specification of the user stories. Assesses the organization’s readiness to embrace the new project. Develops the org’s training plan and training materials. Leads training sessions with internal users. Salesforce Business Analyst Change Management Lead Ensures the system meets the technical specifications outlined in user stories. Solves for complex technical challenges that appear throughout the project. Conducts interviews with stakeholders and internal users about the org’s current training process. Develops tactical action items for the org’s training plan. Leads training sessions. Serves as a technical consult throughout Discovery to determine the feasibility of requirements. Develops the system to the agreed upon specifications through user story delivery. Change Management Business Analyst Salesforce Developer The Lightning Migration Dream Team
  7. 7. Step One: Discovery For this particular client, our team engaged in an 8-week discovery period to best understand the client’s current use of Salesforce. The discovery analysis was split into the following: • Business process reviews: • What tasks do users complete in the system every day? • Which apps do they access? • Which buttons do they click • What information do they need to see on each page they visit? • System-level analysis: • Which features rely on JavaScript buttons? • Are there iframed Visualforce pages? • Will any managed packages require upgrades to function in Lightning? • Great time to reach out to these partners for verification Before you change it, you need to understand what “it” is
  8. 8. Step Two: Requirements & Roadmap Once our Discovery phase was complete, our team of consultants worked with the customer to develop a backlog of user stories to be implemented during, and beyond, the initial migration phase. These stories lived in two distinct lanes: • Minimally-Viable Product Necessities: • Conversion of JavaScript buttons, Visualforce buttons, and other Actions into a Lightning-friendly format • Establish initial Lightning Record Pages for the objects most commonly used by each business unit • Org-Wide settings such as Default Activities View, Enhanced Notes, Enhanced Email, and other items determined in Setup • Deal-breaker enhancements stakeholders require alongside the Lightning transition • Future Enhancements: • Upgrades identified in Discovery that aren’t necessary for the move to Lightning • Business process improvements that will require organization-wide buy-in • AppExchange additions beyond Reports & Dashboards or Transition Assistants Define an action plan for which items will change, and when
  9. 9. Step Three: Change Readiness Assessment These activities, completed throughout Discovery and into Development, will inform the team on how to best proceed with priming the org’s users for Lightning’s arrival. Many of these activities include: • Interviews with the internal training team – if there is one • Exchange of previous training collateral • Interviews with users regarding their experience learning to use Salesforce • Evaluation of the current training team and support materials • Recommendations for training schedule, number of sessions, and session structure • Identification of internal champions who will encourage platform adoption While the developers are at work, how are we going to get 200+ users up to speed?
  10. 10. Step Four: Development Finally, we get to work on some development stories! Let’s take a look at an example: As a Lightning - Sales user When I click the “View Summary” Custom Link on a Contact record Then I will be able to access the “Contact Summary” page just as I was able to in Classic One problem: This OnClick JavaScript button can’t be added to my page’s Mobile & Lightning Experience Actions section! Can we build it? I hope we can!
  11. 11. The Lightning Experience Configuration Converter • Works best for converting JavaScript buttons which pass parameters to a custom URL into Lightning-Friendly custom detail buttons or links • Not the be-all/end-all tool: For more complex button conversions, your developer should hit the trails and learn about Lightning Alternatives to JavaScript Buttons For simple conversions between JavaScript versions to Lightning-support links and buttons
  12. 12. A more advanced technical requirement Management was enthralled by the new Lightning Service Cloud design, but they wanted even more automation out of it. Scenario: Were an associate to navigate to a current customer’s Contact record, management wanted that Contact’s currently open cases to automatically open as subtabs in the Service Console. Since the team had development bandwidth to accommodate some prioritized future enhancement features, we set to work on the solution, made up of a Lightning component and simple Apex Controller… Not minimally-viable technically, but seriously sought after by management
  13. 13. The Result
  14. 14. Step Five: Deployment & Beyond • Ensure your Lightning record pages, objects, apps, record types, and profiles are included in your deployment package in order to assign pages appropriately • If you’re planning on converting from Classic to Lightning Knowledge, contact Salesforce TODAY to enable the migration tool in your sandbox. • Salesforce will not enable this tool in Production until two weeks after a successful test in a full environment! • If you’re planning on allowing users to switch back to Classic from Lightning, set a hard cut-off date for them to get used to the system. The Switcher should be used only if a user finds that they absolutely cannot complete a task in Classic the same way they could in Lightning, and gathering their feedback will inform you on when you can make the hard switch to Lightning. Watch out for these Gotcha’s – they got us!
  15. 15. Summary • Assemble your team • Define your requirements • Determine a change management plan for your users • Develop to the requirements using Salesforce’s tools and custom solutions • Watch out for last-minute gotcha’s in deployment and make sure users have a grace period to report any feedback that might not have been discovered in testing or UAT • Enjoy Lightning Experience! High-Level Steps to Make Your Lightning Transition a Success

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