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Which style does
suit you well?
European
padded shoulders, no
vents, a full-chested and
V-shaped jacket and
“slash”–i.e.,
...
2
50
Shades
of
Blue
Dare to be bold and blue. Reinvent
your professional wardrobe and
discover why the fashion world chose
o...
Its slim fit makes the figure slender and elegant.
Different is the approach of Alexander McQueen,
who prefers a regular f...
Another example of “more conventional” suit is the
slim fit new wool suit by Hugo Boss. This time is
Cerulean blue to catc...
6
HOW TO KEEP YOUR PROPER CARE
-In 6 easy steps-
Sometimes a good quality suit can be confined
in the heap of the forgotten ...
Step 5: Traveling with your suit
Suit’s favourite companion when travel-ing is
not you but its garment bag. Don’t get upse...
9
From
Promotion
to
Emotion
When we decide to shop in a certain store we are
not the only person involved in the process.
Ev...
shopper to address the customer towards
quality brands rather than mid-market ones.
However, it is hard to find the same s...
statement and give us an immediate idea of
what will get by that brand. Looking at the
conceptual map on the right, we see...
13
The Right
Price
of Fashion
Fashion always has a price however,
which price is indeed right?
Tailoring for suits can alread...
Next we have a Silver Blue suit from Hugo Boss,
costing £500 altogether, giving a good deal for
both the suit jacket and t...
16
Suited and booted?
The tie - A simple yet innovative creation that
has evolved from the early 1900's. Historically
the tie...
the 1920s. In the 1940's ties became wider as
well as longer as previously it was popular to
wear high waisted trousers. T...
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A magazined targeted for +50 years hold readers about lifestyle, fashion and trends

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Fine Wine UK Magazine

  1. 1. Which style does suit you well? European padded shoulders, no vents, a full-chested and V-shaped jacket and “slash”–i.e., flapless–pockets British padded shoulders, two vents, pinched waist, flap pockets and boldly striped or plaid patterns American natural shoulders, one vent in the back, straight-hanging lines and flap pockets Ready for the “TopParty”? Wear your best suit and come to the Radisson Edwardian Blu tonight, men. Champagne, fashion talking, the opportunity to meet the editor and the team. But you though it wasn’t enough: free copies of the magazine with a Top gift. Don’t miss it! Let’s go social! Follow TopGent on Facebook and Twitter and keep up with the last news! Street Shot of the week Bread & Butter Berlin Weekly Updates 1
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  3. 3. 50 Shades of Blue Dare to be bold and blue. Reinvent your professional wardrobe and discover why the fashion world chose on blue. This new trend offers a rich update to tailoring, looking fresh in eveningwear by combining blue shades with colours such as sharp white or classical blacks to create timeless appeal. Blue has a vibrancy that adds energy to tailored looks, and is ideal for blazers. In terms of suiting, this colours is definitely the more on-trend. It works particularly well for evening and occasionwear looks, co-ordinated with all its shades from electric to cyan, or with warm accents of brown, orange and yellow to give the optimum colour balance. Each shade has a different meaning and gives a different idea about the product and the person who is wearing it. By now, it is considered the new black and we will tell you why. Blue Navy: carries the symbolism of importance, confidence, power, and authority (including police and military). Darker shades of blue are associated with intelligence, stability, unity, and conservatism. Vivienne Westwood SS14 suit has a 19th century suggestive touch, with the built-in waistcoat, Vivienne's popular orb jacquard lining, faux Horne laser buttons and the iconic lion and unicorn button chain fastening. 3
  4. 4. Its slim fit makes the figure slender and elegant. Different is the approach of Alexander McQueen, who prefers a regular fit and a lively style with the 100% wool checked suit. Less regal but more business-oriented, this suit still gives that sense of “stability” and “cofidence” that we associate with the colour. While Vivienne Westwood suit is available from size 46 to 52, Alexander McQueen offers a slightly less accessible range of sizes (36-42). Price is the other main difference between the two: despite the undeniable quality of VW suit, its price of £1006 (£765 for the jacket, £295 for the trousers) although high is slightly different from the exclusivity statement claimed by Alexander McQueen with his SS14 suit (£1695). Indigo: it appears between blue and violet in a rainbow. Indigo conveys trust, truthfulness, and stability. It also may have some of the authority and royalty of purple as indigo was considered a royal blue. It does not surprise that this sense of “trust” could be related to a Marks&Spencer product, such as this tailored fit indigo suit. Apart from the syle and the details (like the wool waistcoat), this particular suit benefits from a waterproof-processed fabric. The result is a reasonable priced suit (£198) which make you look perfectly smart whatever the weather. Talking about sizes, M&S give you the possibility to combine the three pieces of its suit (jacket, waistcoat, trousers) in different sizes and lenghts. Cobalt: is a medium-dark blue that is soothing, peaceful, and can also suggest richness. Nature, stability, calmness are some of its qualities. Maybe this sense of calmness made Paul Smith take inspiration for its London Collection (which this suit is part of) from popular holiday destinations such as Monaco and Monte Carlo. This elegant suit is composed by three pieces: jacket, trousers and waistcoat. It is made from a wool and mohair-blend cloth which helps avoiding creases. Paul Smith opts for tailored fit as it is clearly one of the most demanded by the consumers. Interesting to notice that this brand is the only one amongst the brands we selected that gives information about the country of origin of these kind of products ( Made in Italy, in this particular case) on the official website. Alexander Mcqueen, £1695 Marks&Spencer, £198 Paul Smith, £990 4
  5. 5. Another example of “more conventional” suit is the slim fit new wool suit by Hugo Boss. This time is Cerulean blue to catch customers’ eyes. In 1999 Pantone named Cerulean the color of the new millennium. They describe it as "the color of the sky on a serene, crystal clear day." Cerulean blue is a soothing, calming color that also evokes feelings of peace and confidence. And confident is the Hugo Boss man, wearing a suit that make the figure look taller and slender in a new wool fabric with an elegant herringbone pattern. No waistcoat this time but 2 side vents to give more freedom of movement. Two flat pocket and three inside to have space of all you need to bring with you. No country of origin specified on the website but information about the packaging (a HUGO BOSS garment bag). Even though Hugo Boss style and quality is well-known and highly-valued, its price can almost become its unique selling point. Paul Smith suit is almost doubled price but its similarities with the Hugo Boss one are numerous and sometimes it’s worth considering whether the effective price is due to the quality of the product or to its “name”. Its a less bright but equally relaxing shade of Cerulean that characterised Ted Baker suit 100% wool. The linings are in polyester, viscose and acetate, while the pockets are in cotton. We have got a notch lapel, other feature which seems to be on-demand by the consumers. One-button fastening, on the other hand and a controversial (and honestly not clear) “modern fit”. After a few researches out team has found out that what we can define as “moder fit” is the combination of all the most solid and advantageous trends that have emerged in the last few years: we talk about slimmer trousers, higher armholes and straighter sleeves. This particular suit is Made in Italy and available from size 32 to 46. A mid-high price make it accessible for a larger audience of businessmen. A half canvas custruction, a centre back vent and a slim notched lapel define the structure of this suit. Two-buttons fastening like most the suits available on the market: overall, a classical suit right for business or leisure occasions. HugoBoss,£500 TedBaker,£550 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. HOW TO KEEP YOUR PROPER CARE -In 6 easy steps- Sometimes a good quality suit can be confined in the heap of the forgotten clothes in a couple of months. Why? Because “good quality” needs “good care”. With this article we will give you a 6-steps-guide to keep a proper care of your suit to wear it year after year. Step 1: Avoiding the Cleaners It is common sense not to throw your suit into the washer but frequent trips to the dry cleaners are even worse. The right moment to do so is when the suit is visible good for another go: dry cleaning will expose your suit to harsh chemi- cals that will damage the fabric. Furthermore, some cleaners may damage the internal canvas- sing of thejacket not practising enough care on the fabric. Instead, care for your suit by steam cleaning it and hang it up with some space between it and the next item in your closet. Step 2: Steaming, NOT Ironing The best way to free your suit of wrink- les and deodorize it is using a gar-ment steamer. Steaming is a delicate method to renew the fibres of your suit and doing it you will prolong its life. A good steamer can be quite expen-sive but it is a long-term investment which will help you keeping your suit in perfect shape over the long time. Avoid steaming the chest area as it does not get crumpled much and stea- ming it may damage the internal canvas. Avoid iron-ing your suits, as a direct contact of an iron on the suit at a high temperature could cause damages and burns. If you have to iron, use a press cloth to protect the wool. Step 3: Hanging It is really important to hang your suit up where it can have space and air. However, not all the hangers will give to your suit the required rest. Avoid using hangers that will leave wrinkles in the shoulders. Another investment to do, and you should know how convenient could be the right investment, is in proper wooden hangers to preserve the shape of the suit. The right hanger should be wide enough to touch the edge of the shoulders and to fill up a portion of them. The best quality, the best result: go for natural wood-made hangers as they are known to absorb the humidity from the fabric. Ikea,£4.49 www.ikea.com Domu,£44.99 http://www.domu.co.uk/ Step 4: Brushing and Rolling A suit deserve care. Natural fibres like wool can hold dust and dirt when exposed to pollution and open spaces. A regular use of a suit brush after each wear will extend the life of your suit and the quality of its fabric. How to do it in the right way is a piece of cake: just hang up your jacket and brush downwards (never perpendicular to the fibres) gently and slowly. Kent Brushes, £11.00 http://www.kentbrushes.com/ 7
  8. 8. Step 5: Traveling with your suit Suit’s favourite companion when travel-ing is not you but its garment bag. Don’t get upset and give to your suit one bag that is not only easy to carry, but will ad-equately protect it. The best are breath-able bags, which will keep your suit cool during the journey. When Traveling without a Garment Bag Sometimes, traveling with a garment bag can be difficult or impractical. For those occasions you must be ready and aware of how to properly fold and pack a suit (picture 4) in the less damaging way. It is not the end of the world: remember that it is the way your suit was folded when you bought it. You can do it! Step 6: Give Your Suit a Break As always happen with your favourite piece of clothing, you would like to wear your best suit in every single occasion. However, this will bring it to deterioration and all the effort to keep care of it will be useless. Try not to wear the same suit every day because the natural wool fibres need time to rest and recover like everybody needs after a long day of work. delightinbuy, £11.50 http://www.delightinbuy.com/ BREATHABLE 8
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  10. 10. From Promotion to Emotion When we decide to shop in a certain store we are not the only person involved in the process. Even if it is not always obvious, many other people are responsible of the manufacturing, marketing and promotion of the product we are buying. If we stop for a second to write down a list of the reasons why we bought that specific product we will probably stuck on price, quality, colour, shape and so on. Basically, we pay attention to the tangible and visible aspects of what we are going to by. However, we don’t realise that several “intangible” characteristics bring us to that particular choice and they result in the way that product and that brand make us feel. Let’s start talking about brand awareness: going in store is not the only way to be informed of the products available and their quality. The majority of brands provides a newsletter which let the subscribed members know about what’s new in store and the latest offers. This kind of engagement with the brand and its organisation make us part of a community, in which we feel our presence is important. Brands like Hugo Boss or Alexander McQueen make this service available and the last one extended the benefits for the members giving the opportunity to obtain a faster checkout and a wish list where to save the favourites products and easily track their availability just signing up online. Nevertheless, emails and newsletter could be considered a bit old-fashioned by a relevant number of current fashion brands, which too often focus exclusively on social networks. However, we still find more down-to-earth ways to engage with fashion brands. Ted Baker does not provide any newsletter but those of you who would like to have chat with the staff about products or any other topic could find a telephone number to call Monday to Friday, from 9am to10 pm on the website. Quite unusual approach but effective for those customers who like talking with someone real rather than sending email which are often left unanswered. Apart from the information about the products and the brands, something which really make us do the decision to buy is our experience in store. Sometimes we don’t even realise that a good customer service and competent advice about sizes and colours could be the best promotion for the brand. What really makes us buy. Sometimes advice are not enough, and we need someone to guide us toward the right choice. In this case, extremely helpful could be the personal shopping service in the actual store. Selfridges has selected a few stores where it is possible to book and appointment (picture above). This is convenient for all the brands within the store, because they obtain guaranteed visibility and the minimum spend make possible for the personal 10
  11. 11. shopper to address the customer towards quality brands rather than mid-market ones. However, it is hard to find the same service provided by the individual brands themselves. Even if a few luxury brands understood its importance ( i.e Hugo Boss ), we surprisingly find out that it is a “middle-market trend” rather than “vice for rich”. It is possible to book an appointment with a personal shopper in Debenhams, John Lewis, Topshop and Marks&Spencer at the following branches: Kensington High Street in London, Fosse Park in Leicester, Market Street in Manchester and Northumberland Street in Newcastle. Another reason why we select a particular store amongst all the others could be the presence of store cards, vouchers we have received by post or email and also limited offers we can find on magazine or newspaper. All of us would agree about the fact that a convenient purchase will always drive us quicker to buy, no matter what and (sometimes) no matter where. However, as it is quiet predictable, it is really hard to obtain vouchers for luxury brands such as Vivienne Westwood or Alexander McQueen, which do not normally use these kinds of promotion to preserve their exclusivity. Moreover, gift cards and vouchers are often accepted only in the licensed store and not in the franchaises, which are far more diffused. On the other hand, gift cards are slightly more popular and widespread even if it is still hard to get them in luxury brands. Obviously, the card itself is a way to promote and represent the brand: starting with basic cards, with poor graphic and layout, to arrive to finely elaborated cards presented in elegant folders. Very nice is the selection of gift cards provided my M&S, which can be topped up to the maximum value of £500. This confirms that most of the times we do not buy the products itself ut the way it is presented to us. The visual element could even more relevant than you could imagine. Let’s take as an example occasions like birthdays or Christmas. Not surprisingly the main focus is always on the presents. Anyway, it is not the present itself which arouse curiosity but its gift wrap, dimensions, colours, sound and smell. Often our first impression overlaps even our judgement and a poor present could be perceived as wonderful. This is the way visual merchandising and in particular shop windows work. How many times have you entered a shop just because the windows was absolutely gorgeous? And while high-street brands usually captivate our attention with discounts and offers, for high-end brands it’s all about brand image and details. There is still a wide use of mannequins, which give us a rough idea of fitting and shape and it is easier to direct our interest toward a particular shop or department. Quirkiness is the modern trend about windows: we find skulls-head mannequins in Alexander McQueen, baroque-inspired arrangements in Vivienne Westwood, extremely contemporary layout in Hugo Boss. All of them gain our attention thanks to a well-balanced amount of details, which end with making us focus on thekey factor: the product. Along with windows, logos themselves play their role in our brand perception. Less and less showed off on the actual products but firmly impressed in our minds. Why are they so important? Because the right mix of colour, name, images, graphic and size works like a above: Ted Baker giftcard: on the left: M&S giftcard 11
  12. 12. statement and give us an immediate idea of what will get by that brand. Looking at the conceptual map on the right, we see the impact of colours and their meaning. Usually, high-end brands make use of plain colours and basic fonts and layout. As we can see, colours like black and blue give an idea or elegance, trust, which fit the standards of luxury brands and our standards in quality and reliability matters. Black is the most popular colour for luxury and menswear brands Below: Alexander McQueen “Skull mannequin” window display Above: Hugo Boss “recycled books” window display 12
  13. 13. 13
  14. 14. The Right Price of Fashion Fashion always has a price however, which price is indeed right? Tailoring for suits can already leave a large price tag, so choosing suits from the right brand is impor- tant, in order to look good without having to waste the cash. So we have chosen 3 smart, tailored navy suits from different brands in order to create a dapper look with the right price. First we have an Alexander McQueen 2-pieced Blumed Check suit from their SS14 collection, costing £1,695 altogether. It is 100% wool, which are one of the reasons for having such a high price tag. However the mix of the dark navy blue and purple, creating a checked pattern across the suit, makes the SS14 piece fashionable and wearable for any occasion. The store indeed conveys the middle market approach by being subtle with the price tag; however the reason for the high cost also links to the amount of stock that is in for this particular pro- duct, which is not many, keeping the exclusivity of the brand. £1,695 14
  15. 15. Next we have a Silver Blue suit from Hugo Boss, costing £500 altogether, giving a good deal for both the suit jacket and trousers. This product is also made from 100% Virgin Wool. But this suit gives a more subtle look to the previous one from Alexander McQueen however, because the shade of blue is Silver blue, it gives an upgrade to a normal suit, making it fashionable and suitable for work and every day wear. This retailer also conveys the middle market approach by being subtle with their prices, however there are more available sizes for this product unlike the previous one, showing that Hugo Boss is also into competitive pricing as they want more availability for more customers to enjoy their products. The next suit is one from the infamous brand Marks and Spencer, known for their good qua- lity and rightly priced products, especially for suits. The silky indigo shaded suit comes to a price of £198 being the cheapest suit out of the 3 we have picked. This particular suit is made out of a mix of polyester and wool, being the reason for a cheaper price tag as it is not 100% wool. However this tailored look is suitable for those that want to look less subtle with the suit colour (upgrade the look with the combination of a patterned tie or shirt) but still is rightly priced. This retailer however conveyed the price-led approach by having the prices of the suits everywhere within that particular section of the store, showing which market within fashion that M&S target their products to. £198 £500 15
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. Suited and booted? The tie - A simple yet innovative creation that has evolved from the early 1900's. Historically the tie was an item of traditional suit attire, predominantly associated with business wear however in today’s 21st century the tie has evol- ved, becoming that of a fashion statement for men. Although the tie is seen as a trendy garment, it is argued that it serves no other pur- pose than as an accessory, which leaves the que- stion remaining, what is the origin of the tie and how did it come about? The tie is a very prominent feature in today’s fast paced, money led society where social status is key, the tie is associated with a profes- sional and smart appearance, symbolising power and authority, a belongingness to a group. Leading business men and women across the world wear one, and are widely associated as an integral part of the traditional suit. Although there appears to be no clear purpose in the tie other than appearance it is argued that a tie helps preserve ones shirt from staining. The tie is assertive and reinforces manhood, anthropo- logists argue that the tie directs a viewer’s atten- tion downwards to the wearers genitals (hence the arrow-like shape) However within the 21st century the tie has been through many adapta- tions and is today widely viewed also as a fashion piece, providing colour and style to what may otherwise be a simple and plain outfit. The tie brings identity and character to ones wardrobe in the same way a lady may wear an item of jewellery the tie is also an accessory in its own right, and has evolved equally as a fashion state- ment piece. But where did the idea of the tie stem from? The necktie has its roots in military history so has always been a symbol of power and strength. China's first emperor, Shih Huang Ti and his 'Terracotta army' were buried in an under- ground tomb in Xi'. Each life - size militia member – replica had a tie, symbolising togetherness and a sense of being united. Evol- ving from neckerchiefs roman orators would wear such items of dress round their necks to keep their vocal chords warm. The Croatian scarf which was part of the country’s military uniform came to France and was embraced as fashionable attire, the French term for 'tie' – 'la cravate' was used to describe the accessory. The 'steinkirke', a neck cloth with long lace ends and which is worn in a dishevelled manner, became popu- lar. It originated at the battle of steinkirke, when French soldiers tucked their neck scar- ves into their buttonholes because they were caught by surprise by the enemy. In the 1920's French fashion designers invented the first variation of a 'designer tie' which was made from more expensive materials and decorated with patterns inspired by the cubism and art deco movement. Becoming more wacky and playful, at this point ties started to become an item of individuality and personalisation. In Britain, regimental stripes have been con- tinuously used in tie designs at least since
  18. 18. the 1920s. In the 1940's ties became wider as well as longer as previously it was popular to wear high waisted trousers. These ties were adorned with unique patterns symbolizing freedom of expression. in contrast in a period of rebellion in the 1950's ties became thinner and less decorative, influenced by the likes of Warren Beatty who starred in the movie Bonnie and Clyde, which revitalised the Ame- rican gangster trend of wearing white ties on dark shirts. In the 70's Elvis Presley introdu- ced the 'kipper' a tie known for its extreme breadth and garish colours and patterns. In the 1980's skinny leather ties became popular typically worn against striped shirts. Today’s neck ties come in a vast array of sizes, stripes, polka dots and designs So now that we have answered why and how the tie came about, you’re probably wonde- ring how to master the perfect tie. The Four-in-Hand The four-in-hand knot is probably the easiest and most popular knot to master since it's asymmetrical - which in the world of neckties means it's already crooked, so it's harder to make it look bad! Some people may also call this one a "simple" knot, and it is good for most occasions. "Skinny" and medium-width ties work very well with this knot. ‘The Full Windsor Tie Knot’ The final knot is the Full-Windsor Knot. Full-Windsor knots go best with longer and wider ties. The shape of the full-Windsor is the same as that of the half-Windsor, but it is just larger than the half-Windsor. Since the full-Windsor is larger, it also appears highly formal and is usually worn with wide spread collar dress shirts and by men with larger necks. Full-Windsor knots go best at highly formal events, such as weddings or business meetings with highly important or powerful individuals. ‘Half – Windsor Tie Knot’ The second knot is the Half-Windsor Knot. The half-Windsor knot is a symme- trical knot that looks like an inverted triangle with the tip cut off that goes well on shirts with medium-width spread collars. Due to its versatility and requiring less of the tie-length for the knot, big and tall men prefer it on a regular basis. It is more formal than the four-in-hand knot and therefore worn on more formal events, such as job interviews and business meetings. “The tie is a very prominent feature in today’s fast paced, money led society where social status is key, the tie is associated with a professional and smart appearance, symbolising power and authority, a belongingness to a group “

A magazined targeted for +50 years hold readers about lifestyle, fashion and trends

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