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Business etiquette

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Business etiquette

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History and Etymology
Business Etiquette
Be considerate of others
Treat others the way you want to be treated
Get to meetings and to work on time
Not making personal remarks
Not being overly familiar
Using handkerchiefs when you cough/sneeze
No mobiles to intrude on another’s space
Opening doors
Giving compliments
Fingers close together
Thumb extended
Straightforward hand
Palm up – submissive
Palm down – dominating
Palm perpendicular to ground – business-like
The ‘bone-crusher’
The ‘dead fish’
The Business Handshake

History and Etymology
Business Etiquette
Be considerate of others
Treat others the way you want to be treated
Get to meetings and to work on time
Not making personal remarks
Not being overly familiar
Using handkerchiefs when you cough/sneeze
No mobiles to intrude on another’s space
Opening doors
Giving compliments
Fingers close together
Thumb extended
Straightforward hand
Palm up – submissive
Palm down – dominating
Palm perpendicular to ground – business-like
The ‘bone-crusher’
The ‘dead fish’
The Business Handshake

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Business etiquette

  1. 1. History and Etymology
  2. 2.  Variously defined as politeness, consideration, thoughtfulness, good manners and behaviour  Treating others as you would like to be treated – with caring, thoughtfulness and courtesy  The earliest treatise that was written on etiquette was in 2400 BC by a member of the Egyptian Royal Court, Ptah Hotep
  3. 3.  Comes from the French words ‘une equitte’ - a placard or ticket  The ticket was handed out to everyone who attended The Sun King’s Court – Louis XIV  The little ticket would detail dress, forms of greeting, dance, food and drink  Non-compliance would result in banishment from the court  That would be the equivalent of being a social outcast in Noble society!!!
  4. 4.  Be considerate of others  Treat others the way you want to be treated  Get to meetings and to work on time  Not making personal remarks  Not being overly familiar  Using handkerchiefs when you cough/sneeze  No mobiles to intrude on another’s space  Opening doors  Giving compliments
  5. 5.  Avoid vulgarity  Not interrupting when someone else is doing the talking  Not talking with the person next to you when someone else is presenting
  6. 6. ...is usually the last
  7. 7.  Visual How you look 55%  Vocal How you sound 38%  Verbal What you say 07%
  8. 8. No. Attribute Scale 1-10 Why? 1 Ability 2 Age 3 Aptitude – sporty, cultured 4 Background 5 Career Potential 6 Cleanliness 7 Confidence 8 Determination 9 Dynamism 10 Education
  9. 9. No. Attribute Scale 1-10 Why? 11 Health and Wellbeing 12 Honesty 13 Intelligence 14 Meticulousness 15 Orderliness 16 Personality 17 Poise 18 Sense of Humour 19 Sincerity 20 Wealth
  10. 10. The Silent Communiqué
  11. 11.  Stance would be erect with hands side by side  Legs would be straight but not rigid  Shoulders would be rolled back  Breathing would be even  Weight would be just forward of centre  Head would be held high
  12. 12.  Open hands/arms - nothing to hide  Closed hands/arms – uneasy/defensive  Hands clasped behind back – confident  Hand clasping wrist behind back – frustration  Hand clasping forearm behind back – nervous
  13. 13.  Open stance - confident  Crossed legs – Insecure  When seated: ◦ Legs outstretched and hands behind head – overconfident ◦ Legs crossed and arms folded - defensive
  14. 14.  Fiddling with objects  Touching hair  Constant touching/rubbing your face  Crossing/uncrossing legs  Rubbing hands together  Shifting from one side to another
  15. 15. Feature Action Message Eye Blinking Nervous Eye Contact Fixed stare I am trying to intimidate you I will not let you get away Smile Does not come to the eyes Smile after every sentence I do not believe what I say I am unsure of myself Face Contraction on forehead Twitches Frown Screwed up eyes Tensed lips Frequent blinking/chewing lips/biting I am worried I do not understand I am not confident I am stressed I am nervous I am scared
  16. 16. Making Physical Contact
  17. 17.  Fingers close together  Thumb extended  Straightforward hand  Palm up – submissive  Palm down – dominating  Palm perpendicular to ground – business-like  The ‘bone-crusher’  The ‘dead fish’  The Business Handshake
  18. 18.  Hands together  Fingertips just below the chin  Head slightly inclined  Good for Indianised meetings  Internationally, good in an informal setting
  19. 19.  Inadvisable at business meetings  Shows over-familiarity with prospective business partners  Meeting with new prospects along with a current associate can be the exception
  20. 20.  Extremely rare at business meetings  Can happen between ladies  Cheek-to-cheek only  Kiss the AIR!!!  Acceptable in Middle Eastern Cultures and European countries, NOT elsewhere
  21. 21.  Happens only in the Far East  Typically in Japan  You may follow suit but be sure that the bow itself is formal and not ‘kowtowing’
  22. 22.  ‘How do you do’?  The response is NOT ‘Fine, thank you’.  The CORRECT response is ‘How do you do’?  American: ◦ ‘Hi! I’m ABC XYZ. How do you do’? ◦ ‘Great, thanks. And you?’  Remember to SMILE!!!
  23. 23. A ‘Who-to-Who’
  24. 24.  Introduce the younger to the older  Introduce your company peer to a peer in another company  Introduce a junior to a senior executive  Introduce a fellow executive to a client  Introduce a non-official to an official person
  25. 25.  Introduce the younger to the older  Introduce a gentleman to a lady  Always use the full name at the first introduction between people  Respect titles: Ms., Mrs., Dr., Prof. etc.  Respect government titles even more: President, Ambassador, Minister, Colonel, General, Commissioner, Inspector etc.  Never use nicknames at the first go!
  26. 26.  ‘I am so pleased to meet you, Mr. ABC XYZ’.  Always use the full name with the correct title the first time  Only on the person insisting, use the first name and offer the same liberty to the person  And for God’s Sake, get the pronunciation RIGHT the first time!!!  If someone has forgotten your name, mention it in passing to avoid embarrassing the person in front of others
  27. 27.  Know the background  Know the pronunciation, get it right  Stick to the basics  Never cross the 90-second rule  Never say, ‘He/She needs no introduction’  Then what are you there for???  Remember, at introductions, your client outranks even your CEO!
  28. 28. Bosses and Beyond
  29. 29.  Always use the full name, with correct title  Never get familiar with a person’s name on the first contact – phone, mail and especially in person  Make sure your peers, juniors and specifically your support staff are clear on this  The Boss’ first name use is good  Never take it for granted
  30. 30.  Judge - My Lord  An Ambassador - Your Excellency  A King - Your Majesty  A Minister - Minister  A Mayor - Mayor  A Bishop - Father  A Priest - Brother/Father  A Nun - Sister/Mother  Holy man - Panditji/Maulvi Sahab  Elder/Senior - Sir/Ji (Indian only)
  31. 31. What your card says and how
  32. 32.  Standard Size: 85mm x 55mm  Most companies have a template  Personalised cards ◦ Print on single side ◦ Have the essentials ◦ Correct title, if applicable ◦ Men should not mention ‘Mr.’ specifically ◦ Ladies can mention ‘Ms./Mrs.’, as applicable
  33. 33.  Present card with type face-up and facing the one it is presented to  Senior Executives: Never thrust your card at them; Wait till you are asked  Make eye-contact when handing over  Be selective: In a large group do not give cards to everyone; seems pushy and looks like you are there to sell something they may not want  Do NOT give your card to everyone you meet; irritating and could regret a stranger misusing it
  34. 34.  Socially: An exchange between two people, do not make a show of it  Better not to give a card than one that is soiled, damaged, outdated cards; get a new set at the earliest (remember to carry it for the next meeting)  5-star or Udupi: No cards to surface  If it is a must, be very discreet  Ideally, do not discuss business during a meal
  35. 35. Mind it!
  36. 36.  Stick to one language, preferably English, even when speaking with your team mates  With others, never assume that they do not understand your lingo  Business partners do a lot of research and learning before they come to the table  NEVER assume that a non-Indian would not know Hindi or another major language  Learn how to say ‘Please’ and ‘Thank You’ in your business partner’s language  If you do not know, find out
  37. 37. A Fine Art indeed!
  38. 38.  Gossip  Criticising others, especially colleagues  Religion  Politics  Long personal anecdotes  Stories with sexual undertones
  39. 39. The Bell Curse!
  40. 40.  Lasting impression  Smile  Answer between the 2nd and 3rd ring  Always identify yourself  Focus on the call  Be helpful  Hold: Give the option to wait or call-back  Thank them for holding on  Tone  Problem: empathise and apologise
  41. 41.  Listen, don’t hear  Be calm, choose your words carefully  Clear and natural  Offer to find out and revert if unknown to you  Transfer on necessity  Messages: re-check and be prompt  Thank them for calling  Complaints: Concerned and polite  Return ALL calls
  42. 42. The reason you are!
  43. 43.  Be punctual  Present your card at the reception  Sit where you are told to; if too many chairs, ask which one to sit in  Sit after your customer  Don’t dump stuff on the table or the floor  Bags on the floor beside you  Don’t fidget with stuff on their table  Leave as soon as business is over  Say thanks for the meeting within 24 hours
  44. 44.  Alert the reception  Make sure there is a meeting room/place  Refreshments on stand-by  No obligation to meet before appointed time  If you are delayed, inform them in advance  Apologise for the delay  Greet them at your office door  See them off, at least to the elevator
  45. 45. Be prepared!
  46. 46.  Be punctual  Do your homework  Ask where to be seated  Stick to the agenda  Remember Body Language  Never interrupt  Keep your jacket on!  Keep business cards ready; in pristine condition
  47. 47. The Trap!
  48. 48.  7:30 – 8:00 AM  Maximum 1 hour  Best places are 24-hour coffee shops  Stick to places with a buffet breakfast  Definitely no alcohol
  49. 49.  12:00 noon – 2:00 PM  Maximum 2 hour  Can prepare for this in the first-half  Get to the point as soon as the orders are placed  Decisions, if any, during dessert  Avoid alcohol  If the client has a drink, order for them, you decline
  50. 50.  3:30 – 4:00 PM  More informal  Less time-consuming  Make sure there are some ‘bites’  No alcohol  Junior most host pours the tea
  51. 51. Don’t become the entertainment!
  52. 52.  Sit opposite at a horizontal table, always  No gossip  No finishing the other’s sentence  Not too personal  No flirting  Discuss business just before the main course  No open-mouth chewing  No elbows on the table  No yawning  Dress well
  53. 53.  Give a three-day notice  Reconfirm on appointed day, 3 hrs. before time  All other rules remain the same  Begin business with the main course  Main discussion during dessert and coffee  Ask questions  Encourage conversation  Napkin on the table only when ready to leave
  54. 54.  Maitre d’ - Rs. 100-500  Server - 10-20% of the bill  Sommelier - Rs. 50-100  Parking - Rs. 10-20
  55. 55. The Final Frontier
  56. 56.  Olives with pits are eaten in bites, pit in plate  Shrimps: 1-2 bites, single dip, tail in plate  Bites: single dip, napkin below the bite  Spray factors: be very careful  Temperature: the inside of the snack is always hotter than the cool outside  Disposal: Never spit, transfer to napkin and then find a bin
  57. 57.  Sparkling ◦ Champagne ◦ ‘methode champenoise’  Still ◦ Red ◦ White ◦ Rose  Fortified ◦ Sherry/Port  Vintage  Young and Old
  58. 58. Webonomics
  59. 59.  Client parties  Company party  Social activity  Fund raisers  Clubs  Trade organisations  Business clubs
  60. 60.  Be aware  Plan  Dress appropriately  Business cards  Practice self-introduction
  61. 61. The Global Village
  62. 62.  Road: ◦ Bus ◦ Taxi ◦ Hired car ◦ Self drive  Train ◦ Seated ◦ Berths  Air: ◦ Economy ◦ Business ◦ First
  63. 63.  Company Guest House  Hotels  Friends/Relatives
  64. 64. Walk on eggshells!!!
  65. 65.  Diaries  Appointment books  Leather wallets  Pen stands  Visiting card cases  Clocks  Calculators  Stationery: pens, pencils, letter openers, bookends, paper weights, calendars, notepads  Accessories: ties, cufflinks, openers, glassware
  66. 66. Bias no more
  67. 67.  Hold the door  MEN first: Revolving doors, escalators  Everywhere else: LADIES FIRST  Men do not have to stand up for a lady  Colleagues can split the bill  No condescension  No patronising  NO physicality  R-E-S-P-E-C-T
  68. 68. That’s all folks!!! Ijaz Shaikh Grey Worldwide 2012

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