Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

Rebalancing in the Age of Disequilibrium

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 21 Anzeige

Rebalancing in the Age of Disequilibrium

Herunterladen, um offline zu lesen

In partnership with Weber Shandwick, KRC Research conducted 23 in-depth, guided, qualitative interviews among C-level and other top executives to understand the challenges and opportunities of doing business in disruptive times.

In partnership with Weber Shandwick, KRC Research conducted 23 in-depth, guided, qualitative interviews among C-level and other top executives to understand the challenges and opportunities of doing business in disruptive times.

Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (20)

Ähnlich wie Rebalancing in the Age of Disequilibrium (20)

Anzeige

Weitere von Weber Shandwick (20)

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

Rebalancing in the Age of Disequilibrium

  1. 1. REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM EXECUTIVE PERSPECTIVES
  2. 2. “IN TODAY’S RUSH OF TECHNOLOGY AND THE RAPID PACE OF CHANGE, BUSINESS LEADERS AND THEIR COMPANIES ARE FACED WITH BEING CAUGHT OFF BALANCE. THEY WORK IN A STATE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM, WHERE THE GROUND SHIFTS CONTINUALLY AND KEEPING UP WITH NEW DISRUPTORS AND DISRUPTIONS MEANS HAVING TO SOLVE PROBLEMS AND RE-BALANCE RISK WITH REWARD IN WAYS NEVER BEFORE IMAGINED.” REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM2 Gail Heimann, President, Weber Shandwick
  3. 3. Objective In partnership with Weber Shandwick, KRC Research conducted 23 in- depth, guided, qualitative interviews among C-level and other top executives to understand the challenges and opportunities of doing business in disruptive times. Senior level executives were promised anonymity. All respondents work or recently worked: + In multinational, established corporations (Fortune 1000 or Fortune Global 500 companies) + In “disruptor” companies (identified based on reference to the 2018 CNBC Disruptor 50 list) Interviewees had multinational experience across the following markets: North America (NA), Central and Latin America (LatAm), Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), and South and Southeast Asia (APAC). Specific countries in which executives have experience include: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Philippines, Russia, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, UAE, UK and the US. Respondent quotes presented in this deck may have been edited for brevity and clarity. Method Telephone interviews were conducted from December 2018 to April 2019 across industries and subject areas: Functional Area ► CEO ► Corporate Communications & Public Relations ► Data Science ► Digital & Technology, IT ► Employee Engagement ► Executive Leadership, Strategy ► Government Relations & Public Affairs ► Human Resources ► Innovation/Business Transformation ► Marketing RESEARCH OBJECTIVE AND METHOD REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM3 Business Sector ► Aviation & Transportation ► Financial Services ► Food & Agriculture ► Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals ► Manufacturing ► Retail, Luxury & Consumer Goods ► Technology & Telecommunications ► Hospitality ► Education ► Media
  4. 4. “EVERYBODY'S TALKING ABOUT WHERE THEY WANT TO GO, AND WHAT THEY WANT TO ACHIEVE, BUT THEY DON'T KNOW WHERE THEY ARE TODAY OR WHERE THEY WERE.” REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM4 Chief Healthcare Informatics Officer, Healthcare & Pharma, North America
  5. 5. THE BIG STORY: DISEQUILIBRIUM REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM5
  6. 6. A common set of challenges among respondents emerged. There are more similarities than differences between the established Fortune 500 and disruptor company executives when it comes to business challenges. Observations on how the Fortune 500 company and disruptor company executives compare are addressed later in this report. THE BIG STORY: DISEQUILIBRIUM REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM6 CHALLENGE 1 Uninterrupted Disruption Is Everywhere. Digital disruption is transforming the global playing field as unlikely competitors join the game. This is challenging establishment leadership using old playbooks. CHALLENGE 2 Understanding Of The Customer Journey Needs A Reboot. The market offers new choices and customer expectations are shifting. Understanding the customer and their new journey is essential for discovering new and advantageous entry points. CHALLENGE 3 Translators And Sensemakers Are Required For Delivering Business Intelligence That Matters. The complexity of business needs human-powered insights and sense-making of the many streams of data. CHALLENGE 4 Differentiation Is Mission Critical. With customer expectations rapidly changing and increased pressure to adapt, organizations must determine the value they bring to customers and how much customers are willing to pay for that differentiator. CHALLENGE 5 Racing Against The Clock. The current pace of business activities is incompatible with the acceleration and speed of the market. Time-to-solution. CHALLENGE 6 Avoiding The Gravity Well. One thing that hasn’t changed is the need to innovate, stay relevant and grow, balancing short- and long-term pressures. To do this requires rethinking how not to get pulled into the corporate quicksand. CHALLENGE 7 Aligning The Culture To Meet The Future. Change management is the central nervous system (CNS) of the future and works better with an advocate who is willing to listen and learn. CHALLENGE 8 A Dynamic Workforce Demands Engagement. Evolving workforce demographics and shifts in societal culture are driving the need to more deeply understand employee wants and expectations. CHALLENGE 9 Reputation Requires 24/7/365 Crisis Vigilance. Sustaining the enterprise requires management of reputational risks—and there are many in a fast-paced playing field where anyone can have a microphone or a point of view. CHALLENGE 10 Keeping The Local In Global. Both a broad and narrow market horizon deepen insights and add value.
  7. 7. CHALLENGE 1: UNINTERRUPTED DISRUPTION IS EVERYWHERE “Where to get new growth is a massive universal concern of C-suites across the country and the world. The whole realm of BUSINESS DISRUPTION, AND MORE SPECIFICALLY DIGITAL DISRUPTION, is a pretty shared one for most industries, and that can be in order to remain competitive. I've got to go through a massive change in how I fundamentally reconceive how I think about my business.” – Former Chief Marketing Officer, Food & Agriculture, NA “Every industry, every sector has had huge technological changes in the last 10, 15, 20 years, perhaps more than in previous times. I think THE ABILITY OF CERTAIN PEOPLE TO KEEP UP WITH THE TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IS NOT AS GOOD AS IT USED TO BE. Perhaps that’s just a function of it coming at you so fast, but unless you are prepared to dedicate the time and the effort and have the ability to do so, then it can be tough.” – CEO, Aviation, APAC “All of a sudden we are facing an INCREDIBLE, DEVASTATING TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION. You get exposed to something which is absolutely unknown by the company, by the industry. Then you have …to make compatible your existing structure with a VERY FAST EVOLVING TECHNOLOGY WHICH IS APPARENTLY FROM THE OUTSIDE, but in reality it's part of your business, or the culture of your everyday activity, that is changing.” – CEO, Manufacturing, EMEA Digital disruption is transforming the global playing field as unlikely competitors join the game. This is challenging establishment leadership using old playbooks. REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM7
  8. 8. CHALLENGE 2: UNDERSTANDING OF THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY NEEDS A REBOOT “How do I sell my product, how do I understand the requirements for my customers, understand their needs, their behaviors, their thought patterns, WHAT IS IT THEY'RE GOING TO WANT IN 3, 5, 10 YEARS’ TIME?” – SVP, Financial Services, EMEA “Lesson number one is understand your consumer. Lesson number two is get over yourself, don't assume you know your consumer. Go understand your consumer. It starts from checking your hubris at the door. Come in with humility and a curiosity to understand where are we really today. AND IF YOU'RE NOT READY TO FACE THOSE HARD TRUTHS, YOU'RE NOT READY FOR THE CHANGE, PERIOD.” – Former Chief Strategy And Innovation Officer, Retail & Consumer Goods, NA “We see the consumer shifting away from this whole concept of the paradox of choice to literally the paradox of chance. If you think about it, who is controlling the algorithm that is supposed to recommend the brand that I'm going to buy? THIS WHOLE CONCEPT OF TRUSTING THE ALGORITHM AND THE PARADOX OF CHANCE IN THESE PLATFORMS IS A FUNDAMENTAL CHALLENGE THAT ADVERTISERS NEED TO START TO PAY ATTENTION TO.” – SVP Insights And Innovation, Media, NA The market offers new choices and customer expectations are shifting. Understanding your customer and their new journey is essential for discovering new and advantageous entry points. REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM8
  9. 9. CHALLENGE 3: TRANSLATORS & SENSEMAKERS ARE REQUIRED FOR BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE THAT MATTERS The complexity of business needs human- powered insights and sense-making of the many streams of data. “The really important people, who I call the ‘TRANSLATORS,’ ARE THE ONES WHO CAN FIGURE OUT WHAT YOU DO AS A RESULT OF THE DATA. I NEVER LACKED FOR DATA. WHAT I LACKED FOR WAS SOMEBODY TO TELL ME WHAT DATA MATTERED AND WHAT DATA DIDN'T MATTER.” – Former CEO And President, Retail & Consumer Goods, NA “If you don't have good data in place, you're not able to exploit new technologies that come on-board. It's really that simple.” – SVP, Financial Services, EMEA “KNOWING HOW TO USE DATA IS CRITICAL. Our philosophy was to be in the largest and fastest growing markets around the world, and so we looked at all the census data. BASED ON THE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY AND GROWTH, THERE ARE PRIMARILY 12 CITIES IN LATIN AMERICA THAT PROVIDED THE BEST GROWTH PROSPECT FOR US that we thought were in our sweet spot, and so all of those cities had either five million plus people in them, they had a growing middle class, and they had an evolving marketplace. And we primarily concentrated on those 12 cities and said, ‘If we're going to win and be successful and deliver our best value, then we have to do it in those markets.’” – EVP, Global Chief Human Resources Officer, Manufacturing, NA REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM9
  10. 10. CHALLENGE 4: DIFFERENTIATION IS MISSION CRITICAL With customer expectations rapidly changing and increased pressure to adapt, organizations must determine the value they bring to customers and how much customers are willing to pay for that differentiator. “I think the key thing as a company is WHAT IS THE AREA THAT YOU'RE GOING TO COMPETE IN. Are you going to be the company that can produce something at the lowest cost, and you effectively piggyback off other people's ideas? Are you going to be the company that can deliver something faster than anyone else, or are you a company that's going to focus on research, development, and innovation, and deliver a quality product before anyone else?” – SVP, Financial Services, EMEA “I would say create competitive differentiation [is another challenge]. MANY HISTORICAL DIFFERENTIATORS HAVE NOW BEEN EITHER COMMODITIZED, OR ERODED ALTOGETHER. I can go and find all of the discounts available, and then make my choice of selection right there. SO PRICE IS NO LONGER A DIFFERENTIATOR as it used to be.” – Former Chief Strategy And Innovation Officer, Retail & Consumer Goods, NA “Defining ourselves as the industry contributor or role player is more and more difficult. One of the ways to deal with that kind of problem is to CLARIFY YOUR COORDINATES ON YOUR VALUE CHAIN. ‘THIS IS MY SPECTRUM, THIS IS MY SPECTRUM OF COLOR, I'M NOT GOING OUT OF RED OR I'M NOT GOING OUT OF VIOLET.’ You have to stay within the spectrum.” – Former Chief Strategy Officer, Manufacturing, APAC REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM10
  11. 11. CHALLENGE 5: RACING AGAINST THE CLOCK The current pace of today’s business activities is incompatible with the acceleration and speed of the market. Time-to-solution. REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM11 “Effectively, the pace of how new products are launched into the marketplace has changed, the way that people can become fast followers at a pace and a speed far greater than ever before. I USE TECHNOLOGY TO CREATE NEW PRODUCTS, AND NEW DISRUPTORS IN ANY INDUSTRY TYPE, FAR MORE QUICKLY, FAR MORE EFFECTIVELY, AND OF FAR GREATER QUALITY THAN EVER BEFORE. That impacts the stability of any organization.” – SVP, Financial Services, EMEA “[Multinational, traditional] companies have been dictating or dominating their field for more than 100 years now. On the other side of our industry are our CUSTOMERS WHO ARE MOVING TOO FAST. They are working 48 hours a day but we are working 24 hours a day, and our suppliers are working 12 hours a day. So we are sort of in the middle which can sometimes cause a lot of confusion inside the organization.” – Former Chief Strategy Officer, Manufacturing, APAC ”New competition is always more speed, and new competition is also maybe more in-touch with their markets than established companies. If you want to make a change, the cost of changing your IT infrastructure is just ginormous. SPEED, AGILITY, AND CONSUMER INTIMACY ARE THE BENEFITS THAT SMALLER COMPETITION HAVE COMPARED TO THE ESTABLISHED ORGANIZATIONS.” – Former Business Advisor/ Executive Coach, Financial Services, EMEA “It's not about disruption, IT'S REALLY JUST ABOUT WHETHER OR NOT YOU'VE IDENTIFIED THE CHANGES FAST ENOUGH SO THAT AS A BUSINESS YOU CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OR ACTUALLY CAPITALIZE ON THOSE CHANGES.” – SVP Insights And Innovation, Media, NA
  12. 12. CHALLENGE 6: AVOIDING THE GRAVITY WELL One thing that hasn’t changed is the need to innovate, stay relevant and grow, balancing short and long-term pressures. To do this requires rethinking how to not get pulled into corporate quicksand. “The biggest thing that a business needs to understand is that the core business model and the organization that supports that core business model is creating a massive gravity well. That GRAVITY WELL HAS GOT INERTIA THAT IS KEEPING EVERYBODY AND THE BUSINESS INSIDE OF IT. You want that gravity well, and you want that inertia so that you can keep optimizing the current business, but when you've got to deal with the kinds of disruption that we're constantly dealing with, unless you recognize and understand that, everything you try is just going to get sucked directly into that gravity well. YOU HAVE TO DESIGN TO BE ABLE TO CREATE OPPORTUNITIES IN THE BUSINESS, WITHIN THE ORGANIZATION, THAT ARE BUILT SPECIFICALLY TO NOT GET SUCKED INTO THAT GRAVITY WELL.” – Chief Marketing Officer, Technology & Telecom, NA “We just have to adapt. We adapt and use the best systems we can. We try very hard to use outdated systems, but then of course, it has a reverse effect in as much as it keeps us in that era and that technological environment because we cannot move ahead because the customer base cannot move ahead with us.” – CEO, Aviation, APAC “The people who've been around a long time, you know, they may have 20, 25, 30 years of experience in the industry. And that experience in and of itself is valuable, but it's going to create huge bias in terms of the pace of change and what may end up disrupting the business. And also makes them UNABLE TO SEE THE THING THAT ULTIMATELY COMES ALONG THAT WILL DISRUPT THEIR BUSINESS…what happens when you're inside of a company is you lose perspective on what's happening in other industries and other spaces and what the lessons are from those other spaces.” – Former CEO And President, Retail & Consumer Goods, NA “When a new technology comes it actually widens the scope of your business. Most companies consider that as a new thing. They'll just treat it as a new feature without actually thinking of how that is profoundly changing the rest of their business, which is why disruptors are coming from scratch. OLDER BRANDS TRY AND SEE HOW THEY CAN BENEFIT FROM THE TECHNOLOGY BUT THEY DON'T REALLY THINK DEEPLY ABOUT WHAT THAT CHANGE MEANS FOR THE WHOLE BUSINESS.” – Former Chief Revenue Officer, Hospitality, EMEA REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM12
  13. 13. CHALLENGE 7: ALIGNING THE CULTURE TO MEET THE FUTURE Change management is the CNS of the future and works better with an advocate who is willing to listen and learn. “We always start internally. We communicate with our employees the changes as they are happening, and often, we run workshops with employees involved in the changes.” – Former VP Global Marketing/Global Technology Management, NA And APAC “They know they have to start asking those questions even though it's not in their personal DNA. So I think to make any transformation proactively happen, it has to be very clearly and authentically the concern of top person. THAT MEANS NOT JUST PUTTING ON A POWERPOINT DECK, BUT LIVING IT, TALKING ABOUT IT RELENTLESSLY, ASKING ABOUT IT IN EVERY STAFF MEETING, AND THEREFORE CAUSING HIS OR HER PEOPLE TO GO ASK ABOUT IT IN EVERY STAFF MEETING, AND MAKE IT A PART OF EVERYONE'S AGENDA.” – Former Chief Marketing Officer, Food & Agriculture, NA “LEADERSHIP SHAPES CULTURE. If they don't have the right leadership, in terms of creating the right culture, whether there needs to be greater dialogue, greater debate, greater risk taking, greater data-centric decision making, that's, I think, always going to be their opportunity.” – Former Chief Strategy And Innovation Officer, Retail & Consumer Goods, NA REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM13
  14. 14. CHALLENGE 8: A DYNAMIC WORKFORCE DEMANDS ENGAGEMENT Evolving workforce demographics and shifts in culture are driving the need to more deeply understand employee wants and expectations. “TALENT RETENTION IS A PRETTY BIG CHALLENGE. The quality of work life, feeling of mobility. It's not even a need for the younger generation to job hop in order to move up. YOU HAVE TO BE VERY COGNIZANT OF WHAT'S DRIVING THEM DAY-TO-DAY. Is their career providing not only the remuneration but the work atmosphere, the flexibility.” – Director, Global Construction Digital & Technology, Construction, NA “The way organizations are having to work to manage, accommodate, and align the culture and people, obviously has an impact by the generation that people are born into, the geography they're working in, the way they expect or want to be working with each other within a company, with each other between companies, and the way that they want to be living their lives. The sort of work, lifestyle, and patterns, expectations that they have of an organization, is something that's changing, evolving, and becoming more important at an ever-increasing pace and speed. The organization increasingly has to react and manage that, because now in the age that we're in, IF COMPANIES DON'T MANAGE CULTURE AND HAVE ISSUES, THE IMPACT IS FAR GREATER AND FAR MORE IMPACTFUL ON THEIR BRAND THAN EVER BEFORE. Equally, people are far more aware about the sort of culture, the sort of company they want to be part of.” – SVP, Financial Services, EMEA “Processes and people go together hand-in- hand and they need to be speaking the same language.” – Former VP Global Marketing/Global Technology Management, NA And APAC REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM14
  15. 15. CHALLENGE 9: REPUTATION REQUIRES 24/7/365 CRISIS VIGILANCE Sustaining the enterprise requires management of reputational risks— and there are many in a fast-paced playing field where anyone can have a microphone or point of view. “It's a really very fundamental issue of what, if anything, ARE THE VALUES OF THIS COMPANY. What, if anything, would we stand up for if the moment came? What would our position be? How would we handle it? Are we sitting in a glass house, and are vulnerable to people saying, or wow, I love what you're saying, BUT DO YOU REALIZE YOU HAVE NO WOMEN IN YOUR EXECUTIVE SUITE.” – Former Chief Marketing Officer, Food & Agriculture, NA “COMPANIES CAN DO A BETTER JOB OF BEING MORE OF A THINK TANK. So instead of waiting for some challenge crisis to happen to say we have these resources is to say HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT THESE THINGS. And these are different ways to do it. You might not use it now, but down the road here's some things to think about. If I were running an organization, I would hold some type of webinar forum or something where maybe it's three times a year I would talk about trends in communication.” – Former Chief Strategy And Business Transformation Officer, Retail & Consumer Goods, NA “You've got most boards that are effectively in the survival mode rather than the strategic- thinking mode.” – Senior Vice President, Financial Services, EMEA “Much more effectively than having terabytes of data from consumers that you've been watching for many, many months, and the way that they behave on your site. All of it is important, but I THINK IT'S THE STORIES THAT WE TELL EACH OTHER, AND ABOUT CHANGING OUR STRATEGIC TRAJECTORY.” – SVP Insights And Innovation, Media, NA REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM15
  16. 16. CHALLENGE 10: KEEPING THE LOCAL IN GLOBAL Both a broad and narrow market horizon deepen insights and add value. “In countries like the US or countries in Western Europe – due to the very well developed logistics and supply chain, connectivity, accessibility to internet – it's much easier for consumers and customers to be fully connected. That means that shifting from the traditional channels to eCommerce is extremely easy. IF WE LOOK INTO DEVELOPING COUNTRIES, TECHNOLOGY IS STILL EVOLVING. In developing economies, they have different expectations and they have a little bit more issues with the government when it comes down on the pricing.” – Chief Information Officer, Manufacturing, LATAM “I think an understanding of the local market and ability to apply local procedures, to have a global perspective, BUT ALSO HAVING A VERY STRONG LOCAL KNOWLEDGE AND APPRECIATION AND UNDERSTANDING [is helpful for problem solving]. I have seen companies from Europe and the US coming in and applying European and American systems and values and approaches to cultures that really don't understand how all this works. It just all backfires.” – CEO, Aviation, APAC “So for us, that's really how we discovered it, WE KIND OF ENDED UP MAKING DECISIONS LARGELY BASED ON ‘BEST FOR COMPANY AS A WHOLE,’ WHICH ISN'T NECESSARILY THE BEST THING FOR PEOPLE IN THE LOCAL MARKET.” – Chief Product Officer/SVP, Online Retailer, NA “In every region of the world, there are different requirements… UNDERSTANDING THE CULTURE AND THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE GEOGRAPHIES YOU’RE WORKING WITH, is obviously fundamentally important.” – Senior Vice President, Financial Services, EMEA REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM16
  17. 17. DISRUPTORS (Ds) AND FORTUNE 500s (F500s): A SUMMARY OF THEIR SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM17 Data-centricity Is Common Ground Both Ds and F500s are in search of more perception and behavioral (signals, conversations) data and meaningful data analysis and analytics. Survey research to understand the “whys” is highly regarded by both. Change Management Is Given Change management/employee engagement is high on the agenda, regardless of D or F500 background. For Ds, change management is baked into their daily growth trajectory; for F500s, it is a paramount necessity that they do not always realize. Regardless, it must be done carefully or credibility is at risk. Customer Is It Customer is still “king/queen,” regardless of Ds or F500s. Deep relationships still matter and understanding the customer journey and experience is critical to understanding value to retain and win new customers. Ds > Opportunistic Ds see more opportunities than threats from so-called “disruptions,” or changes related to new technologies and generational attitudes. (They seem ready to ride the shifts). F500s are more rattled by threats. Traditional boundaries have become fluid, throwing their whole business models into question. The ground is shifting under them while Ds live the shifts. Ds > Tech Fluent Ds are more versatile in discussing technology advances such as AI, machine learning, algorithms, etc. They spontaneously discuss concerns about interpreting behavioral data and AI (i.e., “Do you trust your algorithm?”). Ds > Agile Ds are more likely to embody a Silicon Valley start-up mentality, having gone through the challenges of starting and growing a company, contracting and expanding. Ds Go-to-solve Is The Platform Ds harness “the platform” (i.e., Spotify, Amazon, Apple) in problem solving and are more multi-channel. An interesting dynamic emerged – the Platform Vs Partnership Dilemma. There is an inherent conflict to own the platform vs. owning the connection to the customer and the data itself. Ds raised concern that they are ceding control to the platform at the expense of owning the customer relationship and with the threat of losing control. Whomever has the data, insights, can more effectively capitalize on the market.
  18. 18. SOLVE ON THE FLY REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM18
  19. 19. Executives more easily described problems than offering break-through solutions. Creative problem-solving on-the-go seemed to be the overarching solution. Here are some solutions that were unique and practical. REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM19 FIND THE BEST TALENT AND HAVE THE CONFIDENCE TO LET THEM LOOSE WINNING SOLUTIONS MAP YOUR CUSTOMERS’ JOURNEY NARROW YOUR BATTLEFIELD QUANTIFY BUT QUALIFY YOUR BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE DIVIDE TO CONQUER
  20. 20. “FROM AN INNOVATION STANDPOINT, THERE’S A GAP IN THE MARKET BUT IS THERE A MARKET IN THE GAP?” REBALANCING IN THE AGE OF DISEQUILIBRIUM20 Former Director of Brand Strategy, Healthcare & Pharma, NA
  21. 21. ANDY POLANSKY Chief Executive Officer Weber Shandwick apolansky@webershandwick.com GAIL HEIMANN President Weber Shandwick gheimann@webershandwick.com JACK LESLIE Chairman Weber Shandwick jleslie@webershandwick.com CHRIS PERRY Chief Digital Officer Weber Shandwick cperry@webershandwick.com CATHY CALHOUN Chief Client Officer Weber Shandwick ccalhoun@webershandwick.com SARA GAVIN President, North America Weber Shandwick sgavin@webershandwick.com 21 TIM SUTTON Chairman, EMEA & Asia Pacific Weber Shandwick tsutton@webershandwick.com JONAS PALMQVIST CCO, EMEA Weber Shandwick jpalmqvist@webershandwick.com RACHEL FRIEND CEO, UK & Ireland Weber Shandwick rfriend@webershandwick.com BAXTER JOLLY CEO, Asia Pacific Weber Shandwick bjolly@webershandwick.com ZE SCHIAVONI CEO, S2 Publicom Weber Shandwick zschiavoni@webershandwick.com THANK YOU. For More Info About Rebalancing In The Age Of Disequilibrium, Please Contact: AMANDA BERENSTEIN Managing Director, Mexico City Weber Shandwick aberenstein@webershandwick.com GREG POWER CEO Canada & President Weber Shandwick gpower@webershandwick.com JILL TANNENBAUM Chief Communications & Marketing Officer Weber Shandwick jtannenbaum@webershandwick.com LESLIE GAINES-ROSS Chief Reputation Strategist Weber Shandwick lgaines-ross@webershandwick.com MARK RICHARDS SVP/Management Supervisor KRC Research mrichards@krcresearch.com

×