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THE SCIENCE OF
R E M E M B E R I N G
A LANGUAGE
Image by Horla Varlan on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0
This is no secret, it’s just plain
science.
Image by Steve Jurveston on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
This is no secret, it’s just plain
science.
(It’s not rocket science, though.)
Image by Steve Jurveston on Flickr.com is l...
As time passes, we forget what
we have learned.
Image by North Charleston on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.
Just how quickly do we forget?
Data taken from H.F. Spitzer, 1939
You can forget more than three
quarters of studied material in just
two weeks.
But you can fight that forgetfulness.
Image by Taymaz Valley on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
But you can fight that forgetfulness.
Image by Taymaz Valley on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
All you need to
do...
Repetition and review moves bits and
pieces of the language from your short-
term to long-term memory.
Image by Allan Ajif...
This process is called
rote memorization.
(It’s great for learning vocabulary!)
Before you review your brains out,
consider these tips.
Review early.One:
Remember this graph? Look at how quickly the drop-off begins.
It’s best to review what you’ve learned within 1-2 days of
l...
Review often.Two:
Reviewing once the day after studying is a good first step.
Continue to review words and phrases periodically for
long-ter...
Take breaks!Three:
Do not cram! Reviewing for 15-20 minutes every day will boost
retention without causing burn out.
Image by John Lambert Pe...
Now that you understand the dangers of not reviewing, you
may be asking yourself when, what, and how to review.
Image by J...
This is where we can help, thanks to technology!
Transparent Language Online observes how many
times you get a word right or wrong when learning.
The Learned Words and
Phrases refresh system uses
this data to does 3 things:
 Remember which
words/phrases you’ve
learne...
The more you demonstrate that you truly remember a word,
the less often you’ll see it. Smarter reviewing, just like that!
Don’t forget to remember! Sign up for the free 14-day trial of
Transparent Language Online and see just how much you
remem...
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The Science of Remembering a Language

You may already know the dire consequences of not reviewing what you learn.

One way to review knowledge is to put it into practice; however, when it comes to foreign languages, the people around you may not speak or have any interest in speaking the language you’re learning. That leaves you with the burden of proactively keeping track of what you know and reviewing it on a regular basis. This is where Transparent Language Online* comes in.

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The Science of Remembering a Language

  1. THE SCIENCE OF R E M E M B E R I N G A LANGUAGE Image by Horla Varlan on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  2. This is no secret, it’s just plain science. Image by Steve Jurveston on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
  3. This is no secret, it’s just plain science. (It’s not rocket science, though.) Image by Steve Jurveston on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
  4. As time passes, we forget what we have learned. Image by North Charleston on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.
  5. Just how quickly do we forget? Data taken from H.F. Spitzer, 1939
  6. You can forget more than three quarters of studied material in just two weeks.
  7. But you can fight that forgetfulness. Image by Taymaz Valley on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
  8. But you can fight that forgetfulness. Image by Taymaz Valley on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0. All you need to do is review!
  9. Repetition and review moves bits and pieces of the language from your short- term to long-term memory. Image by Allan Ajifo on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
  10. This process is called rote memorization. (It’s great for learning vocabulary!)
  11. Before you review your brains out, consider these tips.
  12. Review early.One:
  13. Remember this graph? Look at how quickly the drop-off begins. It’s best to review what you’ve learned within 1-2 days of learning it, then periodically after that depending on how well you know the word or phrase.
  14. Review often.Two:
  15. Reviewing once the day after studying is a good first step. Continue to review words and phrases periodically for long-term retention.
  16. Take breaks!Three:
  17. Do not cram! Reviewing for 15-20 minutes every day will boost retention without causing burn out. Image by John Lambert Pearson on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.
  18. Now that you understand the dangers of not reviewing, you may be asking yourself when, what, and how to review. Image by John Lambert Pearson on Flickr.com is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.
  19. This is where we can help, thanks to technology!
  20. Transparent Language Online observes how many times you get a word right or wrong when learning.
  21. The Learned Words and Phrases refresh system uses this data to does 3 things:  Remember which words/phrases you’ve learned  Keep track of their status in your memory  Create opportunities for you to review “stale” words/phrases   
  22. The more you demonstrate that you truly remember a word, the less often you’ll see it. Smarter reviewing, just like that!
  23. Don’t forget to remember! Sign up for the free 14-day trial of Transparent Language Online and see just how much you remember at the end. START LEARNING

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