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Think Grain Think Feed August issue

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Volume 3 | Issue 10
August-2017
RNI No.: HARENG/2014/61357Price: 75/- Postal No. PKL-212/2015-2017
FeedTechExpo 2018Animal Feed Technology
08-09-10 FEBRUARY 2018
Auto Cluster Exhibition Centre, Pune, India
BUSINESS PLATFO...
Published by
BENISON Media
SCO 17, 2nd Floor, Mugal Canal Market
Karnal - 132001 (Haryana)
Tel: +91 184 4047817
info@think...
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Think Grain Think Feed August issue

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BENISON MEDIA is in business of Publishing “ Think Grain Think Feed ” – A Monthly magazine for feed and technology related to it. The magazine provides important information related to animal feed and Grain industry starting from feed crop production to feed additives and premixes, processing and storage technology for poultry, dairy and aqua sector.

It provides a comprehensive information on the market and industry, economic and policy issue, scientific advances, new products, latest technology and latest news and analysis on the development in Feed Industry. Our Feed & Grain magazine is circulated among Government officials, Feed industry, agriculture research and academics, feed millers, raw material traders, technology providers, integrator, cooperatives, veterinarians, embassies, trade associations, storage industry professionals, workers and rural institutions etc.

” Think Grain Think Feed ” is a Feed and Grain magazine for the animal feed industry and its suppliers. It carries

BENISON MEDIA is in business of Publishing “ Think Grain Think Feed ” – A Monthly magazine for feed and technology related to it. The magazine provides important information related to animal feed and Grain industry starting from feed crop production to feed additives and premixes, processing and storage technology for poultry, dairy and aqua sector.

It provides a comprehensive information on the market and industry, economic and policy issue, scientific advances, new products, latest technology and latest news and analysis on the development in Feed Industry. Our Feed & Grain magazine is circulated among Government officials, Feed industry, agriculture research and academics, feed millers, raw material traders, technology providers, integrator, cooperatives, veterinarians, embassies, trade associations, storage industry professionals, workers and rural institutions etc.

” Think Grain Think Feed ” is a Feed and Grain magazine for the animal feed industry and its suppliers. It carries

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Think Grain Think Feed August issue

  1. 1. Volume 3 | Issue 10 August-2017 RNI No.: HARENG/2014/61357Price: 75/- Postal No. PKL-212/2015-2017
  2. 2. FeedTechExpo 2018Animal Feed Technology 08-09-10 FEBRUARY 2018 Auto Cluster Exhibition Centre, Pune, India BUSINESS PLATFORM FOR FEED INDUSTRY www.feedtechexpo.com ORGANIZERFor exhibition and sponsor opportunities Prachi Arora M: +91 8607 463377 / 3366 / 3355 | e: feedtechexpo@gmail.com BENISON Media SCO 17, 2nd Floor, Mugal Canal Market, Karnal-132001, Haryana Ph: +91 184 4047817 | e: info@benisonmedia.com JOIN US @feedtechexpo
  3. 3. Published by BENISON Media SCO 17, 2nd Floor, Mugal Canal Market Karnal - 132001 (Haryana) Tel: +91 184 4047817 info@thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in Publisher & Editor Prachi Arora prachi.a@thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in Monthly Magazine for Feed Technology EDITORIAL COMMITTEE Marketing & Designing Ashwani Verma info@thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in Circulation & Subscription Head Rahul Bhardwaj info@thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in Dr. Dinesh T. Bhosale Former Chairman, CLFMA of India Mr. Amit Sachdev Indian Representative, US Grain Council Dr. P.E. Vijay Anand US Soybean Export Council Dr. Suhas Amrutkar Subject Matter Specialist, Animal Nutrition, MAFSU, Parbhani Dr. SN Mohanty Former Principal Scientist, CIFA Dr. Meeta Punjabi Mehta Agricultural Economist Dr. Swamy Haladi Feed Additive Expert Dr. R Gnana Sekar Lead Consultant, GS Dairy Farm Consulting Dr. Suraj Amrutkar Assistant Professor, Dept. of ILFC, SKUAST-J, Jammu www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in www.benisonmedia.com Managing Editor Dr. T.K. Walli Former Head, Dairy Cattle Nutrition, NDRI EDITORIAL ustard, a crop whose seeds and oil are traditionally used in everyday Mcooking in India, is coming closer to being the country's first transgenic food crop. It also happens to be the feed crop, as mustard oilseed cake is widely used as a protein source for feeding ruminants in India. In India, the University of Delhi's Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop Plants has developed the GM mustard. The goal is to allow plant breeders to develop higher-yielding hybrids of the largely self-pollinating crop. One strain of the bioengineered mustard contains genes from a soil bacterium that cause male flowers to be sterile. Breeders can then pollinate these plants with a strain genetically modified to restore fertility in the resultant hybrids. India's top biotechnology regulator earlier approved the commercial cultivation of genetically modified (GM) mustard. However, before the seeds are released for sowing, India's environment ministry has to discuss the pros and cons of this important decision and then only approve recommendation of the Genetic Engineering Appraisal Committee, the government body that evaluates GM crops On 11 May 2017, genetically modified (GM) mustard has been cleared by Ministry of Environment's Genetic Engineering Appraisal Committee (GEAC) of India for commercial cultivation. According to the Safety Assessment Report of the Sub-Committee on GE Mustard, the bioinformatics analysis data for assessing potential risk of food allergy due to the presence of Bar, Barnase and Barstar transgenic proteins in GE mustard was published in peer reviewed journal, wherein, the authors concluded that none of these three transgenic proteins fall under allergen category, thus this specific publication was one of the key evidence for GEAC clearance of GM mustard. In their study, the authors have performed some bioinformatics comparisons of the primary amino acid sequence of the transgenic proteins in question with the primary amino acid sequences of the known allergens listed in Allergenonline.org and NCBI Entrez protein database. Based on these comparisons, the authors concluded that these proteins are unlikely to present any significant risk of food allergy to consumers. The authors also recommended not to perform any human serum IgE testing to further evaluate possible binding to the Bar, Barnase or Barstar proteins. India's Supreme Court is hearing a case seeking a moratorium on commercial release of the mustard. The Ministry of Environment, Forest & Climate Change has stated it will abide by the court's decision. If accepted, the mustard will be the second GM crop to be approved for cultivation and the first GM food crop. India approved the cultivation of transgenic cotton in 2002. Currently, India depends heavily on imports to meet its enormous demand for edible oils, including mustard oil. TK Walli Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Mustard comes closer to becoming India's next genetically modified crop
  4. 4. Printed by: Jaiswal Printing Press | Published by: On behalf of: BENISON Media | Printed at: Chaura Bazar, Karnal-132001, Haryana | Published at: SCO-17, 2nd Floor, Mugal Canal Market, Karnal-132001, Haryana | Editor: Prachi Arora Prachi Arora | Monthly Magazine for Feed & Feed Technology Vollume 1 | Issue 10 | August 2015 Think Grain Think Feed is a monthly magazine published by BENISON Media at its office in Karnal. Editorial policy is independent. Views expressed by authors are not necessarily those held by the editors. The data/information provided in the magazine is sourced through various sources and the publisher considers its sources reliable and verifies as much data as possible. However, the publisher accepts no liability for the material herein and consequently readers using this information do so at their own risk. Although persons and companies mentioned herein are believed to be reputable, neither BENISON Media, nor any of its employees or contributors accept any responsibility whatsoever for such persons’ and companies’ activities. All legal matters are subjected to Karnal Jurisdiction. Contents Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Front Cover: Olmix SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION: Simple Post Courier Overseas One Year : INR 1200 INR 1800 USD 300 Three Year : INR 3300 INR 4800 USD 900 Five Year : INR 5200 INR 6500 USD 1500 Disclaimer : info@thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in. BENISON Media or Think Grain Think Feed is not liable for any claim prior to written information. The published material and images are sourced from various websites and newspapers, and used for information purpose only, if you have any issue, please inform us at RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT 05 ARTICLE EVENT CALENDAR - 30 MARKET SURVEY UPCOMING EVENTS INTERVIEW Innovative feed transforming Chile salmon sector Quality Standards in Animal Feed Industry 06 10 Science of silo storage PELLETING TIPS 14 MYCOTOXIN SURVEY 16 Mycotoxin survey indicates higher global risks in corn Maize quality preservation in Tropics 18 28 EVENT COVERAGE Market prediction for animal feed enzyme industry Asia Nutrition Forum 2017 announcement 26-28 October 2017 15-16 September 2017 Da ryINDUSTRY EXP 2017 The Farming & Processing Event
  5. 5. Lowering the use of marine raw materials coming from wild catch has been a long-term objective for the feed industry and the offer of alternatives is expanding, said Danish feed firm BioMar. Lower availability of marine raw material and consumers preferences has pushed Biomar to look for resources that allow to reduce the pressure on the marine resources. Development of raw materials is important for the sustainability of the industry in the future. Biomar has an exclusive agreement to distribute AlgaPrime DHA microalgae- based feed ingredient globally. AlgaPrime DHA, developed by Bunge and TerraVia, is a sustainable source of omega-3s, which is responsible for the product's industry-low forage fish dependency ratio (FFDR) of 0.5 kilograms. FFDR is a metric used to evaluate how many kilograms of wild fish are needed to produce one kilo of farmed fish. Average FFDR per salmon in Chile is 1.3:1. Development in feed composition There are diets that include alternative raw materials, such as algae oils, which allow to replace fish oil, without salmon losing its content of omega-3. The algae oil allows to replace fishoil, also if not to 100% yet, while it is possible to produce diets with 0% of R&D www.benisonmedia.com 05 Innovative feed transforming Chile salmon sector fishmeal, which was not possible a decade ago. At present the firm was producing product lines of lower diets for salmon that have no fishmeal at all, which give it great flexibility to always changing raw material market. Discussing about other alternative ingredients, BioMar Group's Chile managing director, Eduardo Hagedorn pointed to trimmings of different types and other raw materials in the pipeline as insect meal. "Today the use of diets with higher energy levels that improve the productive cycle in the sea and the factor of converting feed into kilos of salmon meat is a challenge," he said, noting that innovation in the use of raw material has been expanded and would also drive innovation in the future. He stressed that the FFDR per salmon in Chile had dropped in some cases below 1:1; for Silverside down to the level of 0.5:1. This shows that salmon has become a net producer of marine protein and not a net consumer of protein, Hegedorn said. Antibiotics Consumption of antibiotics in 2016 decreased 31% year- on-year and it is expected to further decrease in 2017, Hagedorn observed. The industry has taken a holistic approach to reduce the antibiotic utilization, according to Hagedorn. Disease detection and fast reaction have proven to be key factors to successful treatments while farming practices, genetics and strengthening fish health status through functional nutrition are helping the industry to decrease the use of antibiotics through prevention. Different actors of the industry are investing a lot in research on this, so we expect to see further improvements in the near future, Hagedorn said. Source: Undercurrentnews ImageSource:Graintec
  6. 6. ARTICLE Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 06 As per the data shared by National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) (Feb 2017:PIB), the dairy cooperative network in the country produces about 3.6 million tonnes per annum of cattle feed, against the installed capacity of about 5 million tonnes per annum across 70 cattle feed plants. The private sector produces an additional 4.5 million tonnes of feed, which totals up to 8 million tonnes per annum, sufficient for only about 8 million cattle out of more than 100 million breed- able animals in the country. Thus, one can access the large gap in the quantity of feed required that is still to be scaled. Comes with the need of feed production, a regulatory framework in place to ensure the quality of the feed produced. Faced with the demand for increasing nutritive value of the feed with limited resources of land and capital, it has been discovered that unwanted chemicals and adulterants have been used in animal feeds as it helps to have high analytical grading for the feed. As per NDDB data adulterants range from substances such as groundnut husk to marble dust and poisonous argemone seeds as well making it more and more Quality Standards in Animal Feed Industry Dr.Prabhakar Maurya, Creative Agri Solutions Pvt Ltd ImageSource:LaughingCrowCurriculum
  7. 7. www.benisonmedia.com 07 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 insightful to follow quality standards which lay down guidelines for the manufacturing to marketing of the animal feed and set up regulations making it mandatory for feed manufacturers to abide by the set standards. Adulteration in feed is directly related to public health importance as meat and milk are directly used for human consumption. The feedstuffs used for feeding livestock can be classified into three major classes depending on the contents of fiber, moisture and nutrients as: green or succulent forages or fodders; dry forages or fodders and concentrate feeds where is maximum scope for adulteration and hence maximum requirement for following the quality control norms. One of the foremost organizations in the world with respect to animal feed industry the American Feed Industry Association. (AFIA) has defined feed quality- control programs as: “All actions directed towards ensuring the product meets the specifications established by the manufacturer”. Any good feed quality-control program contains four components: ! Ingredient quality ! Process control ! Finished feed quality ! Control of toxic substances, including pathogenic micro-organisms Quality Control in Animal Feed The objective of quality control of feedstuffs is to ensure that a consumer should obtain feeds that are unadulterated, true to their nature and produce desired results. Quality control is therefore, defined as the maintenance of quality at levels and tolerances acceptable to the buyer while minimizing the cost of processing. It has to be recognized that feed safety is not the only element that determines the safety of food of animal origin, but that the use of other products, such as drugs and growth promoters (hormones and beta-agonists), also has an impact. Although nutritional quality is important for a common policy in the industry, the main concern is feed safety as part of food safety. Quality has been defined as “Degree to whicha set of inherent characteristics fulfils requirements”. This clearly indicates that achieving quality means fulfilling requirements. The requirements may come from customers and in some cases from regulatory authorities. Usually quality is verified by comparison with a known standard. In view of this, monitoring of quality control at different points has been classified as under: 1. Quality control of raw materials and finished products 2. Quality control during storage 3. Quality control during production Quality Control Legislations in Indian Feed Industry: In the organized sector, animal feed business is quite competitive and feed manufacturers therefore endeavor to produce feed of the highest possible quality. Most of industries are advocating HACCP-hazard analysis critical control point measures to ensure safe feeds. Indian scientists are constantly working to upgrade the quality of Indian feed and make it completely safe for animal feeding. In India the quality control is regulated by to a statuary body Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). It was established under BIS Act, 1986. Earlier, Indian standards
  8. 8. Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 08 Institute was regulating the quality control of various feed commodities. Bureau has set up subcommittees for the standardization of different types of commodities. A sub-committee on animal feeds called Animal Feeds Sectional Committee has been specifically set up to check the quality of animal feeds and feed ingredients. The members of animal feeds sectional committee are the eminent nutritionist taken from the:ICAR institutes; State Agricultural Universities; Feed Industry, Government departments having specialization in Animal Nutrition and Feed Technologist concerned with Animal Husbandry Activities. It ensures expert scientific inputs. The Government of India is empowered with registration act on the Agricultural produce (Grading and Marketing), known as 'AGMARK' standards to fix quality standards and prescribe terms and conditions for using the seal, 'AGMARK'. Government is also taking control measures by legislation to ensure quality and safe feeds at controlled cost. Many regulations have been put forward from time to time to ensure quality standards in animal feed viz: ! The Prevention of Black Marketing and Maintenance of Supplies of Essential Commodities Act,1980 ! The Standards of Weights and Measures (Packaged Commodities) Rules,1977 ! The Consumer Protection Act,1986 ! Schedule of Tariff Values of the Articles Liable to Cess for 2006-07 ! Agricultural Produce Cess Act,1940 ! Edible Oils Packaging (Regulation) Order,1998 ! The Prevention of Food Adulteration Rules,1955 The latest legislation in this respect is Cattle Feed (Regulation of Manufacture and Sale) Order, 2009. The nodal organization involved in India towards developing interlinkages between industry academia and other sectors towards feed manufacturing practices and setting quality norms is Compound Livestock Feed Manufacturers' Association (CLFMA). Quality Control for Feed Safety at International Level International Feed Safety Alliance (IFSA) is a joint program initiated in order to combine the existing feed ingredients quality programs into one program that can operate across the world with one set of standards. To comply with the standards of IFSA, the participants will need to apply the principles of Hazard Analysis (HACCP) and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Under WTO ,SPS Article 3 which deals with Harmonization encourages use of international standards for food safety & animal health i.e. codex. Important Codex guidelineson feed safety include: ! Classification of foods & animal feeds (CAC/Misc 4 – 93) ! Codex General standard for contaminants in foods & feeds (Codex stan193-1995) ! MRLs for pesticides (CAC/MRL 1-2009); veterinary drug (2-2009), extraneous MRLs (CAC/MRL 3-2001) ! Code of Practice on reduction of dioxin & dioxin- like PCB contamination in foods & feeds (CAC/RCP 62-2006) ! Code of practice for reduction of aflatoxin B1 in raw material & supplemental feeding stuffs for milk producing animals (CAC/RCP 45-1997) ! Code of practice on good animal feeding (CAC/RCP 54-2004) ! Principles for traceability/ product tracing as a tool within a food inspection & certification system (CAC/GL 60 – 2006) Way Forward: Quality norms followed by Indian feed industry needs to be aligned with the international standards to have more credibility. The legislations already in place need to be updated with the changing industry needs and a more vigil regulatory framework can be put in place to ensure the adherence to the legislations. The availability of cheaper raw materials can help to attain self- sustenance in animal feed production and maintaining of international quality norms can open business possibilities of export as well. Availability of good animal feed can not only increase the animal productivity but also the quality of their progeny which can be an important intervention in breed improvement. Adherence of quality norms for animal feed production will also ensure a positive step to the public health aspect related to it. ARTICLE
  9. 9. www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 10 Can you please share the history of more than a decade old Indian storage & milling industry? How has the industry evolved over the years? Silo's storage technology came to Indian industry more than 3 decades back, but the growth was very slow in early years. It started with soya industry which stored soy bean before crushing. Feed milling industry followed thereafter to set-up the silo storage plants for the storage of the corn. The paddy-rice and flour milling industry started adopting this technology in the last decade. However, it was the wheat storage project of 650,000 tons capacity by Food Corporation of India, commissioned in the Year 2007-08, which really revolutionized the silo based storage technology in India. For the last one decade, this technology is seeing a double digit growth every year. It is not only the milling Industry which is converting their warehousing storage to the silo storage, but the Government sector (Central as well as State government) are also coming up with the wheat storage projects on regular intervals. However, while the current production of grains viz. wheat, paddy, maize, soy bean, barley, pulses etc. in India is more than 250 Million Tons, the present installed capacity of grain storage silos is not more that 3 Million Tons. This shows that there is a huge scope for growth of storage sector in India. There are multiple advantages of silos over warehousing, some of them are listed below: a. Silo storage requires just 1/4th of area required for warehousing b. The grain wastage is minimal comparatively c. The quality of stored grain would be better through What are the competitive advantages of silo storage over warehouse storage? What are the challenges that customer face in the silo storage? Please brief about its economics? Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Science of silo storage Naveen Sareen, GSI Science of silo storage
  10. 10. www.benisonmedia.com 11 silo storage, because of pre- cleaning and drying d. The overall cost of grain handling through silo storage is also lower Silo storage is a science which must be learnt, if followed correctly the ROI can be much better. Some of the points which must be considered while investing in silo storage are as follows: a. The grain to be stored in silos must be dry (having less than 12 % moisture), if the storage period is more than a month. However, for a storage period of less than a month, it can be stored around 13- 14% moisture . Grain storage at higher moisture for long term will not only lead to infestation of grain but also affect the quality of the galvanized wall sheets of silos. b. The warehouse are much easier to build, whereas silos require experience to build as well as to run, as there are other equipments like elevators and chain conveyors are also involved, which are integral part of a grain silo project. c. If the storage capacity requirement is less than 10000 tons, it may be cheaper to build up a warehouse but beyond 10000 tons of grain storage, silo storage will be more economical to build-up. d. Conventional warehouse can be operated by support staff with lot of manpower requirement at the time of unloading & loading of grain, whereas for running a silo storage plant it requires a few skilled technical personal with no major requirement of manpower. Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Features that make silo storage different from conventional warehouse : a Temperature measurement system- The temperature of the grain inside the silos can be continuously monitored through the advanced grain temperature measurement systems and any abrupt increase in the grain temperature, gives an alarm to take the timely corrective measures in terms of aeration, fumigation, rotation or chilling of grains. b Aeration system- The grain can be aerated on regular intervals to keep its temperature lower and hence reduce risk of infestation. c Fumigation system- For long term grain storage especially in tropical weather conditions like in India, the aeration may work to a certain level . However, to preserve the quality of the grain over a storage period of 3- 4 months, the grain can be fumigated. d Chiller- For storage of grain over long term, an alternate solution can be the use of chilling technology wherein the temperature of the stored grain can be brought down to around 12-15 deg C by using grain coolers or chillers to preserve the quality of grain. This is more relevant for the longer period of storage of grains likes corn and white rice which sometime need to be stored at a higher moisture of around 13-14 percent which may become a challenge to achieve with aeration and fumigation systems. e With increasing demand of silo storage technology, plants are being built and operated in different geographical weather conditions all over the country, across all the grain sectors (like wheat, paddy, maize, soya bean etc.), there is an urgent need to establish safe operating parameters.
  11. 11. INTERVIEW Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 12 Could you please elaborate on the role of pre-cleaning, drying and other processes for feed grain storage? Please list the maintenance tips that you would like to share with end users? The pre-cleaning and drying play a very relevant role in silo storage, especially while designing the plants for a country like India wherein the major harvesting is being done using conventional methods and the grain harvested from the field at higher moisture have higher percentage of impurities like sand, dust, chaff, stones, etc. Processes like pre- cleaning and drying reduce the wear and tear of milling and handling machinery, prevent grain spoilage, reduces the aeration cost which all lead to economical and better quality end- product. As mentioned earlier, silo storage is more about understanding the science of storage. There are various factors which should be in check while operating the silos. Following are the tips for better maintenance: a). Level sensor should be in working condition b}. Silo should be sealed properly to avoid water seepage from base c). Aeration should be performed continuously after complete coverage of aeration floor sheets or at least first ring completion during filling d). Temperature of the stored grain should be checked on regular interval e). Aeration should be avoided in humid weather f). Firstly, the grain should be unloaded by gravity from the central outlet, thereafter with outlets next to the center and so on till the grain stops coming out. Finally the remaining grain has to be discharged using sweep auger g). Safety procedure like use of safety harness while entering the silo should be strictly followed GSI has always been a preferred supplier for the silos globally, considering their manufacturing quality standard and the safety features incorporated in its silo design. The company came to India in the year 2003-04, when it build-up its first paddy silo storage project for around 60,000 tons storage capacity near Gurgaon. Since that time the company has started its operations in India, having supplied silos to the most prominent players of the milling industry like ADM, Cargill, Japfa, Godrej Agrovet, Venky's, Suguna etc. Five year back, GSI established its operations in India and build-up a strong team of professionals which believe in serving the customer with best quality. What makes GSI stand ahead of its competition, as many national and international players are serving the market before its entrance in India? Warehouse storage v/s Silo Storage
  12. 12. PELLETING TIPS www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 14 Maize quality preservation in Tropics Dr Naveen Kumar, Delst The production of maize can be increased either by expanding acreage or by increasing the yield per hectare. But, it is very important that whatever we produce, must be used most efficiently and the losses need to be minimized. The average loss incurred during the post-harvest storage of maize is around ~7 percent. Part of this loss can definitely be arrested by adopting proper storage technology. As it is well known, the molds like Aspergillus can colonize and contaminate maize very quickly during the storage. The moisture present in stored maize along with temperature and humidity in the environment favors its growth. The beginning of Aspergillus contamination in maize also triggers pest infestation and biodegradation. Aspergillus excretes toxins like Aflatoxins in the grain, which is of major concern as it has potential carcinogenic effect on humans and animals. With the growing concern over food safety, Aflatoxins are now closely monitored throughout the supply chain of food and feed processing industry, which has negatively impacted the maize prices. In the last 2 decades, the poultry industry has shown excellent growth which is now capable of producing 2.5 kg of broiler meat at 35 days of age and white egg layers producing 330 eggs in 52 weeks. In India, maize or other grains, which are unfit for human consumption, are generally used in animal rations. But with the improved productivity, use of contaminated maize is no more an option for the livestock industry and even the immunity of farm animals is now almost all time low. Higher moisture content (free water) in the maize results in moisture migration (along with spontaneous heating) due to day and night temperature differential in the stored mass. This is a major reason for mold Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 ImageSource:VideoBlocks
  13. 13. www.benisonmedia.com 15 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 infestation that triggers spoilage process. This signifies the importance of maize drying. But unfortunately, the technology is quite expensive and its availability and accessibility to the maize growers and stockers is also very limited. Grain to retain the moisture The solution lies in deliquescent technology, the technology is used currently in all seasons. It helps the grain to retain the moisture and thus stops moisture discharge from the endosperm, thus nipping the bud of mold formation even before it could start. As it prevents migration of free water thus also saves on pest management. The technology can save ~7 percent of what would have been lost otherwise. Moreover, this is an organic as well as non-toxic material, and even available at a exponentially lesser cost than mold inhibition, aeration, fumigation and other such methods. Though in recent years, private players are much more aware about the quality preservation during storage and also its importance, but lack of the basic infrastructure is certainly a concern for grain storage. To resolve the problem, it needs to be readdressed, by decentralizing and storage of grain in a more sustainable and cost effective manner, at the farmer level. This technology certainly has the potential.
  14. 14. MYCOTOXIN SURVEY www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 16 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Deoxynivalenol and fumonisins continue to top list of most prevalent mycotoxins worldwide. Mycotoxin-related threats to livestock production have remained elevated in most regions of the world. Over 33000 analyses were conducted on 8452 finished feed and raw commodity samples sourced from 63 countries from January to June 2017, covering common components used for feed such as corn, wheat, barley, rice, soybean meal, corn gluten meal, dried distillers grains (DDGS) and silage, among others. According to BIOMIN, the main trends emerging from the survey include: ! Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FUM) continue to top the list of most prevalent mycotoxins worldwide, as they are found in 81% and 71% of samples, respectively. ! Countries analyzed throughout the Western Hemisphere all registered as high risk in terms of mycotoxin-related threats to animals. ! Most countries in Asia showed an increased risk of mycotoxin contamination in the second quarter, compared to the first quarter of 2017. Top threats Overall, deoxynivalenol and fumonisins were detected in 81% and 71% of all samples at average levels of 798 ppb and 1,840 ppb, respectively. Out of all samples, 52% were contaminated by zearalenone. Aflatoxins, T- 2 and OTA were present in 26%, 19% and 18%% of samples, respectively (Figure 1). Co-contamination A full 94% of all samples contained at least one Mycotoxin survey indicates higher global risks in corn 26% 52% 81% 19% 71% 18% 1 0,8 0,6 0,4 0,2 0 PercentageofSamples Afla ZEN DON T-2 FUM OTA All Regions - Prevalence of mycotoxins detected on All Samples Figure 1. Occurence of mycotoxins worldwide in January to June 2017 ImageSource:Plusvet
  15. 15. www.benisonmedia.com 17 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 mycotoxin, and 76% of all samples contained two or more mycotoxins (Figure 2). Results for corn The most common mycotoxins found in corn (maize) samples analyzed from January to June 2017 were FUM (90%), followed by DON (84%) and zearalenone (49%). “Trends in finished feed risk tend to match corn risk over time due to the prominence of corn, or maize, in animal feed,” explained Dr. Timothy Jenkins, mycotoxin risk management product manager at BIOMIN. “The corn risk varies by region, with FUM issues more common in warmer conditions, whereas DON was more common in cooler regions.” Results for soybeans DON was the most prevalent mycotoxin found in soybean samples worldwide (79%), followed by zearalenone (73%). T-2 toxin, aflatoxins and FUM were detected in 39%, 38% and 26% of samples, respectively. “In the last year-and-a-half, we've seen a marked increase in the mycotoxin contamination of South American soy and soy byproducts,” Jenkins said. Multiple mycotoxin presence Consistent with results noted in the first quarter of 2017, more than three- quarters of samples analyzed contained two or more mycotoxins, which presents additional risks. Certain combinations of mycotoxins are known to have synergistic effects that aggravate the negative consequences for animals. “Subclinical symptoms often related to the main fusarium mycotoxins — DON, zearalenone and FUM — can be difficult to detect but have a greater economic impact for the industry,” Jenkins said. “Poorer feed efficiency and low growth rates are associated with the presence of low-level multiple mycotoxin contamination.” Jenkins offered some advice on mitigating the risk associated with mycotoxins. “Avoid contaminated feed when possible, and pay attention to feed storage conditions. Given the widespread occurrence of mycotoxins globally, further steps may be warranted,” he suggested. “Despite the most strenuous efforts to prevent mycotoxins from occurring, mycotoxin contamination of feedstuffs still occurs. Proven, state-of-the-art strategies that adsorb or deactivate toxins in the intestinal tract of animals offer the most reliable, safe and effective solution,” he added. The annual Biomin Mycotoxin Survey constitutes the longest running and most comprehensive survey of its kind. The survey results provide insights on the incidence of the six major mycotoxins in the agricultural commodities used for livestock feed in order to identify the potential risk posed to livestock animal production. Source: Biomin 26% 1 0,8 0,6 0,4 0,2 0 PercentageofSamples Co-Contamination of mycotoxins on All Samples - samples tested for at least 3 mycotoxins 18% 76% <limit of detection 1 mycotoxin more than 1 mycotoxin Figure 2. Co-occurence of mycotoxins worldwide, January to June 2017 Ceylon Grain Elevators Plc (CGE), Sri Lanka's leading poultry integrator, has asked to import corn where licenses have been issued to third parties, restricting trade. CGE said in a quarterly review that hiked price of local corn and associated import restrictions persisted during the period under review, which have directly affected the company's bottom line. “Therefore, with the aim of relieving the local corn supply shortage, appeals have been made to the government to issue import permits directly to feedmillers to procure better quality corn at competitive prices,” it said. Sri Lanka's leading poultry integrator seeks corn import permit INDUSTRYNEWS
  16. 16. www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 18 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 The animal feed enzymes industry, which accumulated a revenue of USD 1.1 billion in 2016, is set to surpass USD$2 billion by 2024, according to Global Market Insights, Inc. A drastic change in the consumption patterns of dairy products and processed meat is likely to spur animal feed enzymes market growth. Consumer trends have also been depicting a change of late, with regards to the ingestion of protein-rich food. Not to mention, the growing consciousness to enhance the fodder quality is expected to create bright growth prospects for the business players who are eager to increase their geographical presence. Supported by intensive consumer preferences for the product over antibiotics, animal feed enzymes market is slated to expand at a lucrative growth rate over 2017-2024. Growth Trajectory Animal feed enzymes market has adequately established itself across myriad geographies. Europe animal feed enzymes industry, for instance, which is estimated to garner a revenue of more than USD 860 million by 2024, will grow at a CAGR of over 6% during 2017-2024. Escalated presence of industry majors with access to effective distribution network channels will enhance the regional growth. Widespread livestock production in the region is also anticipated to further contribute toward the revenue. As per forecasts, Spain, Russia, and Germany are expected to catalyse the business expansion. In fact, Russia animal fed enzymes industry is expected to accrue a massive revenue, subject to high pork consumption across the country. Asia Pacific animal feed enzymes industry, which accrued a revenue of over USD 220 million in 2016, is set to expand at the rate of 7.5% over the period from 2017 to 2024. Increase in the intake of meat in countries such as India, Japan, and China coupled with rising cognisance about the livestock ailments will provide a boost to the business. Execution of stringent food safety norms along with heavy consumer demand for fodder additives is predicted to favourably leverage the development of US animal feed enzymes industry. Growth in various segments Livestock such as ruminants, poultry, swine, and aquaculture are the major consumers of animal feed enzymes. Poultry, which accounted for over 40% of animal feed enzymes market share in 2016, is projected to majorly impact the industry revenue in the coming years. Increase in the intake of eggs and meat in the form of protein rich Market prediction for animal feed enzyme industry MARKET SURVEY ImageSource:ExperientialIdeas
  17. 17. www.benisonmedia.com 19 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 regarding the health benefits of a fish-based diet will undeniably impel animal feed enzymes market size from aquaculture, slated to grow at a cumulative rate of more than 7.5% over 2017-2024. Ruminant applications are expected to generate a revenue of more than USD$450 million by 2024, thereby lucratively impacting animal feed enzymes industry size. Swine applications, on the other hand, are forecast to register gains of more than 6.5% over the coming timeframe with the growing demand for pork in Asian countries such as Indonesia, China, and Thailand. Different types of Enzymes Animal feed enzymes are available in the liquid and dry forms. Dry formulation, which contributed to more than 75% of the overall animal feed enzymes market share in 2016, is predicted to drive the segment growth over the coming years. Key enzymes Non-starch polysaccharides, phytase, carbohydrase, and protease are the key animal feed enzymes products. Phytase animal feed enzymes market, which made remarkable contributions of over 40% towards the global industry size in 2016. Protease market was valued over USD 150 million in 2016. Enhancing proteins that bind starch within forage ingredients makes more of starch energy available to the livestock. Source: Global Market Insights diet will benefit the segment growth, as per analysts. Aquaculture is a relatively profitable segment of animal feed enzymes industry. Growing consumer consciousness
  18. 18. www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 20 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Factory farming in Asia creating global health risks Growth of intensive units has potential to increase antibiotic resistance and could result in spread of bird flu beyond region The use of antibiotics in factory farms in Asia is set to more than double in just over a decade, with potentially damaging effects on antibiotic resistance around the world. Factory farming of poultry in Asia is also increasing the threat of bird flu spreading beyond the region, with more deadly strains taking hold, according to a new report from a network of financial investors. Use of antibiotics in poultry and pig farms will increase by more than 120% in Asia by 2030, based on current trends. Half of all antibiotics globally are now consumed in China alone. The growth of Asian meat production in intensive units is also producing a rise in greenhouse gas emissions from the food chain, with emissions likely to rise by more than 360m tonnes. There are knock-on impacts such as deforestation, as China's need for animal feed is responsible for more than a third of Brazil's soybean production. Asian food companies have rapidly expanded their meat production in response to growing populations and the tastes of the rising middle class, but this expansion has come to the detriment of food safety. Jeremy Coller, of Coller Capital, said: “Investors have a big appetite for the animal protein sector in Asia. But the growth is driven by a boom in factory farming that creates problems like emissions and epidemics, abuse of antibiotics and abuse of labour. Investors must improve the management of sustainability issues in the Asian meat and dairy industries if they want to avoid a nasty bout of financial food poisoning.” However, the report also found that deploying modern techniques could assist in reducing the impact of factory farming – for instance, by using barcodes to enable consumers to check the provenance of eggs, by reducing greenhouse gases and improving the health of livestock. Avian flu is an increasing threat, with the latest strain to take hold in China, H7N9, proving more deadly than previous strains. It has already killed 84% more people in the four years since its emergence than the H5N1 strain that came to public attention in 2006. Affected industries in China include suppliers to McDonalds and Walmart. An outbreak of bird flu in South Korea in 2016- 17 resulted in the cull of a fifth of the country's flock. The authors of the study recommended that investors assess the risks of food production in the assets they hold, as financial firms can persuade the companies they fund to make improvements in their supply chain. Source: Guardian INDUSTRY NEWS
  19. 19. Tel :+74952871354
  20. 20. INDUSTRY NEWS Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 22 GM crops bounce back from 2015 decline More genetically modified (GM) crops were planted in 2016 than 2015, but the adoption of GM agriculture varied widely across Asia, report says. Global acceptance of genetically modified (GM) crops sprang back in 2016 after suffering a decline in 2015, according to estimates by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA). According to ISAAA's Global Status of Commercialised Biotech/GM Crops: 2016, released in May, 185.10 million hectares of GM crops were planted in 2016, showing an increase from 179.70 million hectares in 2015. In 2014, the global area under GM crops was 181.50 million hectares. These numbers come from 26 countries, 19 of which are developing countries. The top five countries growing GM crops are the US (72.90 million hectares), Brazil (49.10 million hectares), Argentina (23.80 million hectares), Canada (11.60 million hectares), and India (10.80 million hectares)—totaling 91 percent of the global area under GM. Soybean accounted for 50 percent of the global area under GM crops in 2016. It was followed by maize (33 percent), cotton (12 percent), and canola (5 percent). Other GM crops available in the market today include sugar beet, papaya, squash, aubergine and potato. The non-profit ISAAA estimates that biotech crop planting increased 110-fold in the 1996-2016 decade, with an accumulated area of 2.1 billion hectares. As the “fastest adopted crop technology in recent times”, biotechnology has helped alleviate poverty and hunger, benefiting 18 million small farmers and their families. However, according to the ISAAA media release, “the promises of biotech crops can only be unlocked if farmers are able to buy and plant these crops. “Farmers with little or no capital hesitate to adopt this tool (GM technology),” Rosalie Ellasus, GM maize farmer from the Philippines, and representative of the Asian Farmers Network, tells . In fact, adoption and acceptance of GM technology has not gone unchallenged, though in varying degrees across the Asia-Pacific region. “Some countries in South-East Asia such as Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar have the potential to adopt biotech crops but do not have ImageSource:DeliciousLiving
  21. 21. Bangladesh market for farmed fish up 25 times in three decades A study shows that the market for farmed fish grew by a dramatic 25 times in three decades in Bangladesh. The latest study of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) also said among fish farmers, 75.0 per cent of them sell fish commercially. The study said Bangladesh is experiencing a quiet revolution in its domestic fish farming sector, with significant gains among all the players in the industry. The Washington-based global think tank, IFPRI, notes, "The fish value chain in Bangladesh is growing and transforming very rapidly, in all segments. The quiet revolution in the fish value chain is a domestic market revolution: 94% of aquaculture production is destined for domestic consumption." The government has targeted to make the country self-reliant in fish production by 2019, with producing 4.2 million tonnes of fishes from current level of nearly 3.8 million tonnes. With an annual production of nearly 20 lakh tonnes of cultured fish, Bangladesh is the world's fifth largest producer of inland aquaculture after China, Indonesia, India and Vietnam, the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) stated in its report titled “State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2016”. Ricardo Hernandez, IFPRI research coordinator and lead author of the study, said “Aquaculture has become an important driver of Bangladesh economy and the industry now employs as many persons as the garment sector, another growing success story in the country.” "What really surprised me about these findings was the extent of the growth in many sectors, not just in production but also in many off-farm segments, such as rural and urban traders, input dealers and feed mills," he said. He said the rapid growth has been spawned by increased demand, improvements in technology, communications and infrastructure; and investments by millions of farm households and small and medium enterprises. The researcher said that the government played an important role in infrastructure investment such as investment in fish seed production, electricity and roads. “There has been a proliferation of feed mills, hatcheries, farmers and traders, with rapid increase of purchased seed and feed, rapid increase in the use of chemicals, increase in the use of hired labor, and rapid increase in investment in agriculture equipment," said Hernandez. Noting significant improvement in marketing of fish the study said that rural fish farmers used to sell their fish to local traders just over a decade ago, but they are now selling two-thirds of their product to large wholesalers based in towns and cities. Statistics of Bangladesh's Department of Fisheries (DoF) figures show that the country's annual fish production stands at 37 lakh tonnes, and nearly 56 percent of that comes from farmed fish, 28 percent from captured fish and the rest from marine fisheries. According to the DoF, fisheries contribute 3.69 percent of Bangladesh's GDP and over 23 percent of agricultural GDP. With an average fish intake of 53 gram per person a day, fish now account for 60 percent of protein supply for the entire population. Aquaculture saw a robust growth of 8.2 percent, much higher compared to the average growth rate of all fisheries (5.4 percent) in the last one decade. Source: Financial Express www.benisonmedia.com 23 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 biosafety regulations,” Rhodora Aldemita, senior programme officer at ISAAA, tells. “Others like Myanmar have adopted GM crops while still drawing up regulations,” she adds. Indonesia is yet to firm up feed regulations, the Philippines is struggling with regulations that have halted biotech crop approvals, and Thailand's strict regulations only allow field testing, Aldemita says. India has restricted GM technology to non-edible crops like cotton. Approvals for GM aubergine and GM mustard have not gone beyond field trials, with public litigation and provincial governments blocking attempts at commercialising these staples. “We have concerns regarding the biosafety of GM food crops that are similar to what we see in most of Europe,” Aruna Rodrigues, the main petitioner against the technology in India's Supreme Court, tells. Source: Asian Scientist
  22. 22. INDUSTRY REPORT Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 24 Skretting Vietnam officially opened a new state-of-the-art shrimp feed plant in the Mekong Delta, with an initial production capacity of 60,000 tonnes annually. The new 23,000 square metre facility is located within the Thuan Dao Industrial Zone, Long An, for the convenience of local customers as well as to make best use of the transport links to other important farming provinces in the area. “Building on several years of experience operating in Vietnam, we feel that 2017 is the year for our ambition to reach new heights: New heights in terms of delivering innovation and best product performance to our customers; and new heights in term of providing best standard of working environment for our employees,” pointed out Marc Le Poul, General Manager of Skretting South Asia. Skretting Vietnam's new plant will adhere to the same robust standards, support and ways of working that are in place at all other locations operated by Skretting and parent company Nutreco. For his part, Alex Obach, Managing Director at Skretting Aquaculture Research Centre (ARC), informed that the firm's shrimp feed Lorica is designed to shield shrimp during challenging phases in their lifecycle, including transfer and handling. Furthermore, its unique formulation delivers invaluable support to the defence mechanisms of these animals, enabling them to better cope with stress factors. “This investment will be a vital contributor to the progress of Vietnam's aquaculture industry and meeting the dietary needs of its fast growing population. We shall continue to provide you with all the knowledge and support that you will need to take this industry forward into a new golden age,” pointed out Nutreco Executive Committee, Samson Li, Managing Manager of Nutreco Asia. Vietnam became part of the Skretting family in 2010 through the acquisition of Tomboy Aquafeed JSC, a reputable Vietnamese fish and shrimp feed company. In the seven years since the purchase, Skretting Vietnam has fully embedded the Skretting culture into all of its operations – from research and raw material procurement to products and services for aquaculture. State-of the-art shrimp feed plant opens in Vietnam ImageSource:UndercurrentNews
  23. 23. www.benisonmedia.com 25 Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Charoen Pokphand Foods PLC (CPF) has committed to maximizing marine resource use by partnering various organizations to restore marine fertility and has also targeted to reduce fishmeal ratio in aquaculture feed production to no more than 5 per cent. This commitment has been announced by DVM Sujint Thammasart, chief operating officer for CPF's aquaculture business, who also pointed out that the firm said that the company targets to reduce the use of marine resources by upgrading animal breeding and cut down sea water use in aquaculture operations. In this way, it has managed to reduce the fishmeal used in shrimp feed production from 35 per cent to 7 per cent in the last two decades and is targeted to fall further this production, to 5 per cent in the next 3 years. "We have a clear guideline in protection and conservation, to ensure the sustainability of marine resources. We place our emphasis on innovating shrimp feed formula to reduce fishmeal which is part of marine resources, and shifting from black tiger shrimp farming to Vannamei shrimp," Thammasart stressed. In addition, CPF initiated “Grow-Share- Protect Mangrove Forestation” project in collaboration with the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources, Biodiversity-based Economy Development Office (Public Organization) and civil society groups, to preserve and restore mangrove forests for greater biodiversity, allowing marine lives to grow and preserving the country's coastal and inland ecosystems. The firm's president also stressed that involving in shrimp farming and shrimp feed meal operations, CPF purchases fish meal from suppliers for the production of shrimp feeds for the company's shrimp farms. He outlined that fishmeal is generally sourced from 1) by-products of processing plants like Surimi, canned tuna and fish ball plants and 2) by-catch which is subjected to the sustainability and traceability rules under the International Fishmeal and Fish Oil Organization's Responsible Supply Chain of Custody (IFFO RS COC), which are certified by the IFFO. Source: FIS CPF plans to further reduce fishmeal in shrimp feed
  24. 24. INDUSTRY NEWS Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 26 Global seeds giants have called for transparent, science-based approvals processes for new crop types after China approved two more genetically modified (GMO) crops for import, but left four others on the waiting list. China recently approved Syngenta's 5307 insect-resistant corn sold under the Agrisure Duracade brand and Monsanto's 87427 glyphosate-resistant corn, sold under the Roundup Ready brand, for a period of three years. The move was the second in the past month to expand access to biotech seeds as part of Beijing's 100-day trade talks with Washington, and took total approvals to four after Dow Chemical Co's Enlist corn and Monsanto's Vistive Gold soybeans were given the go- ahead last month. But it leaves four other products owned by Monsanto, DuPont and Dow on a waiting list pending approval. The other three crops are Dow's Enlist soybeans and two alfalfa products developed by Monsanto. The U.S. industry has repeatedly complained about the lack of transparency in China's biotech review process. Beijing has in the past held back approvals of imported GMO products amid concerns about anti-GMO sentiment in the country. Monsanto acknowledged the progress made with the latest approvals in its statement but stressed the need for a "predictable, science-based and transparent regulatory approval process in China" to allow new products to reach growers. Hopes that all six would get the go-ahead in the second round mounted after the National Biosafety Committee (NBC), a group of experts who advise the government on GMO safety, met late last month to review the products, company executives and experts said. The approvals come after China promised to speed up a review of pending import applications as part of the 100-day trade talks with the United States. China is the top export market for U.S. agricultural products. While the country does not permit planting of GMO food crops, it does allow GMO imports such as soybeans and corn for use in its animal feed industry. Getting new varieties approved for import takes years, forcing leading agrichemical players to restrict sales during China's review process. Earlier this year, DuPont Pioneer began a limited commercial introduction of its next-generation Qrome corn products under stewardship in the western United States, allowing it to make the new technology available to some growers ahead of Chinese approval. Source: Reuters DuPont, Monsanto urge transparent GMO crop reviews in China ImageSource:GlobalFoodSafetyResource
  25. 25. www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 28 Event Coverage Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017 Leading animal health and nutrition professionals alongwith researchers, academics and expe rts from the food and feed industries will gather in five cities: Dhaka, Delhi, Taipei, Wuxi, and Tokyo, from 22 October to 1 November 2017. Held every two years, the Asia Nutrition Forum assembles hundreds of experts, researchers and academics from the food and feed industries around the world to address the latest challenges in the animal health and nutrition arena in Asia. It is the premier scientific assembly for connecting with peers, fostering partnerships and exchanging information, experiences and best practices. 'Driving the Asian Protein Economy' will be the theme of this year's forum. “As the world faces a projected population increase from today's 7.5 billion people to 9 billion people by 2050, the demand for food sources, especially protein, is on the rise.The highest growth in demand currently comes from Asia, which comprises a full 30% of the world's land area and60% of the world's population. It is therefore imperative for the industry to stay informed of the latest technological advances, and to drive the production of quality, sustainable protein sourceshere in Asia,” said Marc Guinnement, Managing Director of BIOMIN Asia Pacific. The 2017Asia Nutrition Forum will offer top industry professionals the opportunity to explore the factors driving the future of the Asian protein economy. The plenary session will address key challenges in livestock industry, with a focus on the rising trend of antibiotic- free production in Asia.A panel of leading speakers will delve further into topics concerning poultry and swine production. First held in 2005, the Asia Nutrition Forum hosted by BIOMIN has become the leading opportunity for industry practitioners to share ideas and exchange knowledge, alongside the World Nutrition Forum. These biennial summits are consistently well rated by attendees. Each edition draws upon the uniqueness of the location, speakers and participants while maintaining the highest quality standards for both content and organization. For further details, please visit www.anf.biomin.net. Asia Nutrition Forum 2017 announcement
  26. 26. Think Grain Think Feed - Volume 3 | Issue 10 | August 2017CALENDAR OF EVENTS www.thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in 30 2017-18 To list any industry event related to Grain & Feed industry please write us at info@thinkgrainthinkfeed.co.in SEPTEMBER AFIA Liquid Feed Symposium Date: 12-14 September 2017 Venue: Louisville, KY, USA Email: afia@afia.org Web: www.afia.org CLFMA AGM & National Symposium Date: 15-16 September 2017 Venue: JW Marriott, Mumbai, India Email: clfmaindia@gmail.com Web: www.clfmaofindia.org Feed Additives Date: 27–29 September 2017 Venue: Amsterdam, The Netherlands Email: olympia.theocharous@briefingmedia.com Web: www.feedadditives-global.com NOVEMBER Poultry India Date: 22-24 November 2017 Venue: HITEX, Hyderabad, India Email: info@poultryindia.co.in Web: www.poultryindia.co.in Date: 26-28 October 2017 Venue: Auto Cluster Exhibition Centre, Pune, India Email: dairyindustryexpo@gmail.com Web: www.dairyindustryexpo.com OCTOBER FEBRUARY Date: 8-10 February 2018 Venue: Pune, Maharashtra, India Email: feedtechexpo@gmail.com Web: www.feedtechexpo.com MARCH FVG Asia Date: 27-29 March 2018 Venue: BITEC, Bangkok, Thailand Email: maarcservices@gmail.com Web: www.victam.com APRIL Livestock Asia Date: 19-21 April 2018 Venue: Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre, Malaysia Email: rita.lau@ubm.com Web: www.livestockasia.com FeedTechExpo 2018Animal Feed Technology Da ryINDUSTRY EXP 2017 The Farming & Processing Event NZFMA Broiler Nutritionist Conference 2017 Date: 16-20 October 2017 Venue: Queenstown, New Zealand Email: info@nzfma.org.nz Web: www.nzfma.org.nz

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