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Design decisions in job architectures and competency modeling June 2020

Skill and competency management has emerged as a required function for organizations struggling to adapt to new circumstances. A well designed skill and management program can square the circle of resilience - efficiency - adaptation, allowing organizations to shift gears from one mode to another. Implementing skill and competency management requires a series of design decisions.

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Design decisions in job architectures and competency modeling June 2020

  1. 1. karen@ibbaka.com steven@ibbaka.com Building Capability Management
  2. 2. Design Decision Framework Key designs in job architecture and competency modeling ● Decision structuring ● Mapping Jobs - Roles - Skills ● Job rationalization ● Combining models karen@ibbaka.com steven@ibbaka.com June 1, 2020
  3. 3. CONTEXT 3 I Ibbaka © 2020 ● Skill and competency management has emerged as a required function for organizations struggling to adapt to new circumstances ● A well designed skill and management program can square the circle of resilience - efficiency - adaptation, allowing organizations to shift gears from one mode to another ● The impact can be transformational ○ Rapid development of the new capabilities need to deliver new categories and business models ○ Internal mobility and a more engaged workforce ○ Skill-based teams that deliver more successful projects ● Effective implementation of a skill and competency management program requires a set of design decisions, making decisions in the right order is critical to success ○ Cascading choices to frame the decisions ○ Use case prioritization to stay focussed ○ The big three design decisions ■ One competency model or many ■ Roll out in a big bang or successive waves ■ Begin with a top down or bottom up approach (eventually you will need both)
  4. 4. CASCADING CHOICES FOR SKILL AND COMPETENCY MANAGEMENT 4 I Ibbaka © 2018 Winning Aspirations Where to Play How to Win Capabilities Systems Prepare for the Future Adaptation - Resilience - Efficiency New capabilities Internal Staff Extended Talent Network and Partners Recruiting Team Building Build a competency model Focus on bottom up skill identification Map skills to learning resources Competency Model Design Community Building Skill Curation Learning Resource Management Skill and Competency Management System Integrations This an application of Roger Martin’s Cascading Choices to Skill and Competency Management. See his book with A.G. Lafley.
  5. 5. KEY BUSINESS QUESTIONS 5 I Ibbaka © 2020 Leaders need to be able to answer key business questions about skills in their organization ● What skills are available to our organization? ● How are they being applied? ● Do we have the skills we need to meet today’s goals? ● Will we have the skills we need to meet tomorrow’s goals? ● Are there hidden pockets of potential we can deploy? ● Who are the critical people on our team? ● What skills are driving high performance? ➔ Ibbaka Talent answers these questions
  6. 6. A STANDARD APPROACH TO CASCADING CHOICES AND KEY DESIGN DECISIONS 6 I Ibbaka © 2020 1. Set goals - frame using the Cascading Choice Model for skill and competency leadership. 2. Choose 1-3 use cases to focus on for the initial roll out. 3. Make the three big framing decisions a. One competency model or many b. Roll out in a big bang or successive waves c. Begin with a top down or bottom up approach (eventually you will need both) 4. Design the Job Architecture and Competency Model(s) a. Components (Job - Role - Values - Behaviors - Tasks - Skills - Resources and so on) b. Connections (how the components connect) c. Structure - map to the organizational model d. Paths - design paths from one Job or Role to another 5. Decide on the approach to assessment a. How will assessments be used b. Who will assess c. What is the assessment system
  7. 7. A STANDARD APPROACH TO CASCADING CHOICES AND KEY DESIGN DECISIONS 7 I Ibbaka © 2020 6. Plan application integrations a. What data needs to be shared b. On which systems c. How often d. What data exchange mechanisms are available e. Design data mappings f. What are the systems of record g. Where are the security and privacy risks 7. Configure the skill and competency management platform a. Category systems b. Assessment approach c. Security and privacy rules 8. Plan the roll out a. Recruit leaders and influencers b. Develop key messages
  8. 8. A STANDARD APPROACH TO CASCADING CHOICES AND KEY DESIGN DECISIONS 8 I Ibbaka © 2020 8. Plan the roll out a. Recruit leaders and influencers b. Develop key messages c. Plan communication cadence d. Make sure the plan communicates value and outcomes to all key stakeholders (including users) 9. Support adoption a. Make sure all skill profiles have some skills suggested b. Help leaders and influencers develop their profiles c. Focus on one piece of functionality at a time d. Report on use, impact and value delivery 10. Adapt and evolve a.
  9. 9. Develop new capabilities Personalize learning and development experiences Enable self-directed career growth Build cross functional skill-based teams • Model the new capability in a modular and dynamic way • Use Open Competency Models to accelerate development • Find the people with potential to develop the skills • Identify skill gaps between an individual and the organization’s model to target learning investments • Support a full 70:20:10 approach to skill development • Identify core and target skills • Use continuous assessments as skills are applied in different contexts • Correlated investments to performance outcomes • Design team skill needs • Understand the complementary and connecting skills • Search and combine people into skill-based teams COMMON USE CASES Skill and competency models can deliver on many business cases. To begin choose just a few to focus on, preferably one, no more than three. 9 I Ibbaka © 2020 1 2 3 4
  10. 10. Increase utilization Improve employee engagement Build an extended talent network Enable internal mobility • Leverage internal skills before hiring in • Find hidden skills that are needed for projects • Staff using skills rather than depending on relationships • Empower employees with insight into their skills • Support career aspirations • Demonstrate a commitment to employee success • See all of the skills available to you through partners and gig economy workers • Take rapid advantage of emerging opportunities by leveraging your network • Publicize available jobs across the company • Match jobs and roles to skills • Support cross functional teams COMMON USE CASES Use cases should support individual uses, teams and company level objectives. 10 I Ibbaka © 2020 5 6 7 8
  11. 11. FRAMING CRITICAL DECISIONS 11 I Ibbaka © 2020 Components of a Job (Roles - Common - Specializations) One or many competency models Top down and bottom up Roll out strategy (Big Bang or Successive Waves) Integration Points Job architecture and competencies need to map to each other Easier to integrate top down and bottom up approaches with smaller models Big Bang - emphasis is on Top Down Approach Successive Waves - allows for ore adaptation during roll out In designing the job architecture and competency model map to systems of record and data integrations
  12. 12. EVALUATING CRITICAL DECISIONS - COMPONENTS 12 I Ibbaka © 2020 Components of a Job (Roles - Common - Specializations) One or many competency models Top down and bottom up Roll out strategy (Big Bang or Successive Waves) Integration Points Key Considerations Given the need to reduce the number of total jobs and to improve internal mobility the following are important design considerations: 1. Identify what is common to all jobs Values; Expected behaviors; Core knowledge) 2. Design an architecture that makes use of reusable components In our experience the most powerful reusable components are a. Roles (Jobs can be composed of roles) b. Task Clusters (tasks that frequently come together) c. Skill Clusters (use the concept of ‘associated skills’ and ‘parent skills’ to simplify Skill to Task and Skill to Role mapping 3. Allow for job specializations and local jobs The general jobs can sometimes be too generic for specialized functions. Different geographies may need customization. Instead of creating new jobs for each circumstance, use job inheritance to allow for customization while maintaining scalability and replicability Associated Skills: Skills frequently used together by the same person for in a role or to perform a task Parent Child Relations: Can be applied to any part of a model, allow for inheritance of properties from the general to the specific or from the more abstract to the more concrete
  13. 13. EVALUATING CRITICAL DECISIONS - ONE OR MANY MODELS 13 I Ibbaka © 2020 Components of a Job (Roles - Common - Specializations) One or many competency models Top down and bottom up Roll out strategy (Big Bang or Successive Waves) Integration Points One Model Multiple Models + - + - Easier to maintain consistency Can apply model wide rules Can apply content across models Support cross functional mobility Takes a very large effort to put in place Governance is more difficult as multiple functions are involved More difficult to adapt In most companies new models will spring up for new business functions or capabilities no matter how tightly this is locked down Easier and faster to develop and evolve Can focus on the needs of specific business functions Easier to import and use external models from open source projects, industry groups or consultants Contradictions and inconsistencies can develop between the different models Model governance is easier but managing across models and business functions can be more difficult Recombinant Competency Models: Ibbaka is developing the technology to manage modular competency models where pieces can be shared and connected across multiple models; at a minimum, require a common architecture across models
  14. 14. EVALUATING CRITICAL DECISIONS - TOP DOWN OR BOTTOM UP APPROACH 14 I Ibbaka © 2020 Components of a Job (Roles - Common - Specializations) One or many competency models Top down and bottom up Roll out strategy (Big Bang or Successive Waves) Integration Points Top Down Bottom Up + - + - Communicate an organization wide view Integrate with other parts of the organizational design Apply formal structures that make it easier to scale and manage the model Governance is easier Employees often feel the model is being imposed and does not reflect their actual skills or roles Engagement is often lower Evolution of the model is much slower Use must be mandated Rapidly captures the actual skills being used and how these map to jobs, roles, tasks, performance Emergent skills are seen early and can be supported Engagement is generally higher and their can be viral adoption Can become chaotic and contradictory if not well curated Requires an ongoing investment in curation Can be difficult to align with organization goals and other parts of the organizational design Integrating top down and bottom up approaches: See next slide. One can accelerate rollout and adoption by combining the two approaches and operating in parallel.
  15. 15. POSSIBLE ORDER OF WORK Develop Skill Profiles Import Existing Skill Libraries Develop Competency Models Seed Skill Profiles (C.V.s and LinkedIn) Understand Current Skills Frame Requirements Integrate Connect Skill Profiles to Competency Models Evaluate Bottom Up Skills for Inclusion into Formal Models
  16. 16. EVALUATING CRITICAL DECISIONS - ROLL OUT STRATEGY 16 I Ibbaka © 2020 Components of a Job (Roles - Common - Specializations) One or many competency models Top down and bottom up Roll out strategy (Big Bang or Successive Waves) Integration Points Big Bang Successive Waves + - + - Shared model across whole organization Leadership can convey a consistent message across the whole organization Internal mobility between different business functions is enable Easier to build cross functional teams Large upfront investment before value is generated Requires change management at scale Often leads to excessive standardization and over simplification Model can be tailored to target audience Communication can be tailored to target audience Much faster time to value Easier to implement the parallel process on the preceding slide Does not fully realize cross functional use cases (for internal mobility and cross functional teas) Requires additional effort to keep models aligned and current as successive models are implemented Generally takes longer to reach the whole organization than the Big Bang approach Hybrid approach - Roll out organization wide components (Values, Expected Behaviors, Core Knowledge and Skill Profiles in a Big Bang approach but Job-Role-Task models as successive waves.
  17. 17. EVALUATING CRITICAL DECISIONS - INTEGRATION POINTS 17 I Ibbaka © 2020 Components of a Job (Roles - Common - Specializations) One or many competency models Top down and bottom up Roll out strategy (Big Bang or Successive Waves) Integration Points Integration Points 1. Identify key applications in the HR - Talent - Learning - Performance - Work Management ecosystem 2. Develop a data catalog for the types of data currently on each system (look for duplications) 3. Look for mappings where by one data type can be transformed into another. a. Skills can be used to describe learning objects b. Tasks can be mapped to skills c. Job Descriptions can be transformed into learning paths 4. Define data privacy and data ownership rules a. GDPR b. German Work Councils c. Align with company values and policies 5. Define integration styles a. Extract Transform Load b. API c. Shared database access (or data lake) d. Common database 6. Decide on system of record and data flows a. What is the system of record for each data type b. What order does data flow from one system to another
  18. 18. POSSIBLE INTEGRATION POINTS Ibbaka is the system of record for skills, connecting the HR and Learning Ecosystems System of Record for Skills HRIS & Talent Management Applicant Tracking System Business Information Systems Learning Management System Credentials Learning Resources Roles to Learning Path Jobs & Skills Jobs & Skills Individual Skills Learning Experience Platform Data for Analysis 18 I Ibbaka © 2020 Professional Services Automation Availability Skills Project Management Performance Management Task to Skill Mapping Skills Performance Reviews
  19. 19. CHOICE ORDERING 19 I Ibbaka © 2018 Top Down or Bottom Up One Model or Multiple Models Big Bang or Successive Waves Model Architecture Integration Plan Change Management Model Architecture Integration Plan Change Management Seed Profiles Design Model(s) Integrate Evolve and Adapt
  20. 20. BEST PRACTICES IN ADOPTION 20 I Ibbaka © 2020 1. Have leaders and key influencers engaged with their own skill profiles 2. Seed profiles with skills to avoid the ‘cold start’ challenge 3. Accelerate development by importing existing libraries (third party, internal, open source) 4. Use skill libraries that reflect the actual work and language being used 5. Keep the skill libraries dynamic so that they evolve with use 6. Frequently report on key trends, to managers and to individual users ○ Trending skills ○ Growing areas of expertise ○ Skill clusters ○ Skills in demand
  21. 21. CONFIGURATION OPTIONS 21 I Ibbaka © 2020 The following are easily configured as part of a standard subscription: ● Default privacy settings ● Skill categories ● Levels of expertise and descriptions of expertise ● Expertise feedback (self rating, manager rating, peer rating, expert rating, evidence rating) ● Organization architecture (business units, geographies, matrix reporting)
  22. 22. Contact us c/o VentureLabs Suite 1100, 555 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC Canada V6B 4N6 Steven Forth Karen Chiang E: steven@ibbaka.com E: karen@ibbaka.com T: +1 (604) 763 7397 T: +1 (415) 799 8326 W: ibbaka.com 22 I Ibbaka © 2020
  23. 23. Additional Information
  24. 24. Ibbaka Talent Architecture We extract skill data from multiple applications, documents and social interactions, recommending additional and potential skills and represents this data in the Skill Graph. Skills, roles, projects and people are shown in the Skill Map, which is easy to search and can be used to build skill- based teams. 24 I Ibbaka © 2020
  25. 25. Ibbaka Talent Skill Graph The Ibbaka Talent AI is able to infer real and potential skills from this graph. By comparing skill requirements for roles and projects skill gaps can be found. Jobs Roles Behaviors Skills Learning Resources Credentials 25 I Ibbaka © 2020
  26. 26. Configurable Competency Models • Design and configure a competency model that meets your unique needs • Connect competency models to profiles and see who has the required skills or where skill gaps exist • Add learning resources to help build new capabilities • Connect skills and competencies across your HR ecosystem Models Jobs Behaviors Skills Learning Resources Credentials 26 I Ibbaka © 2020
  27. 27. Open Competency Models 27 I Ibbaka © 2020 Competency models shared under a Creative Commons license. Can be downloaded for use independent of Ibbaka. Evolve based on community input and skills actually being used. Validated through workshops and by partners. On the Ibbaka platform they can be combined and customized. In 2020 1H ● Customer Success ● Design Thinking ● Pricing Expertise ● Adaptation to Climate Change
  28. 28. SCREENSHOT - PERSONAL PROFILE 28 I Ibbaka © 2020
  29. 29. SCREENSHOT - TEAM PROFILE 29 I Ibbaka © 2020 Screen shots that reinforce story told in first conversation
  30. 30. SCREENSHOT - TEAM BUILDING 30 I Ibbaka © 2020
  31. 31. SCREENSHOT - COMPETENCY MODELING 31 I Ibbaka © 2020
  32. 32. SCREENSHOT - CONNECTING A JOB TO A SKILL PROFILE 32 I Ibbaka © 2020

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