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ERP 101 Series: Engineering Basics - The Importance of Part Master Records and Bills of Material

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ERP 101 series, 'Engineering Basics - The Importance of Part Numbers and Bills of Material' will help you understand the importance of part numbers and how to link those part numbers together into meaningful bills of material.

You'll learn:
1.The importance of part number structure (intelligent vs. unintelligent numbers)
2. How to deal with different types of parts
3. The structure bills of material to support MRP

Veröffentlicht in: Software
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ERP 101 Series: Engineering Basics - The Importance of Part Master Records and Bills of Material

  1. 1. ERP 101 Engineering Basics David Bush Senior Manufacturing Consultant, Rootstock
  2. 2. The ERP 101 Webinar Series Date Topic Aug 2, 2016 An Introduction to ERP for Manufacturing & Distribution Aug 16, 2016 Engineering Basics – The Importance of Part Master Records and Bills of Material Aug 30, 2016 Engineering Basics - Maintaining Accuracy through Revisions and Change Order Control TBA Shop Floor – Explore how ERP is used to create and maintain Work Centers, Routings and Procedures TBA Shop Floor – See how scheduling the Shop Floor through ERP controls Labor and Machines TBA Procurement – Link your Vendors and Purchased Parts via ERP TBA MRP – Step though an overview of this vital ERP subset TBA Sales – See how you can link your Customers and Products via ERP TBA Manufacturing Accounting – An overview using standard cost TBA Manufacturing Accounting – An overview using weighted cost
  3. 3. Meet Our Speakers David Bush Senior Manufacturing Consultant, Rootstock • 30+ years of manufacturing and MRP/ERP systems experience • Previously at General Microcircuits, Consona Corporation, Relevant Business Systems, Inc
  4. 4. A Recap • In the last webinar, we discussed: – The unique characteristics of manufacturing & distribution organizations – Key ERP concepts – Bill of Material Processor (BOMP), Material Requirements Planning (MRP), MRPII and ERP – The evolution of MRP/ERP since the 1960s – The differences between MRP and ERP and how MRP fits into modern ERP systems.
  5. 5. In This Episode • We will cover the engineering basics: – Part numbers, and why they are important – Components and Sub-Assemblies – BOM Structure Just how important are these items?
  6. 6. Part Numbers – Foundation of Your ERP • How important is a solid foundation? • In the ERP system, part numbers make up the ingredients for a strong and reliable system.
  7. 7. How Do You Define Part Numbers? • Should I: – Use the description as a part number? – Use ‘smart’ part numbers? – When do you need to create a new part number?
  8. 8. Part Numbers – Important Considerations • What do I need to consider about part numbers? – Description – Unit of measure – Source – Type – Lot/Serial Control
  9. 9. Part Numbers – Cont’d • Is this item a component, subassembly or finished good? • Will it be inventoried? • Will it be sold to customers (finished good or spare part) • Is it active or inactive? • Who is responsible for maintaining the record? • Is there company-specific information I need to record? • If your company has multiple divisions, where will this item be inventoried and where will it be used?
  10. 10. OK, we defined part numbers. Now what? Lets look at the Foundation again
  11. 11. Part Numbers – Foundation of Your ERP • Now that we have our components, how do we put them together to form our foundation? • How does this work in a manufacturing environment?
  12. 12. • Remember our bicycle drawing? • How do the components come together to form the finished item? • How does the BOM help us understand the structure of the finished item?
  13. 13. Components and Sub-assemblies • The finished item comprises: – Components • Manufactured • Purchased – Sub-assemblies • Manufactured/assembled • Purchased
  14. 14. Sub-Assemblies This is an example of a sub- assembly BOM showing the parts and quantities. What else needs to be considered when developing the BOM?
  15. 15. Building a BOM • Parent and component part numbers and quantities have been entered. • Will any of the component be lost as calculated scrap during production? • Will any of the components be lost during setup? • Will tooling or fixtures be added to the BOM? • When do we add another level to the BOM?
  16. 16. You Have a BOM. What Questions Remain? • The BOM accurately reflects how your product is built. But: – What happens when the parent or subassemblies are re-designed? – How does manufacturing know which design to build… latest configuration or a past design? – How is MRP (Material Requirements Planning) affected by these changes, and how does it react? To be continued…….
  17. 17. In Summary • Today, we covered – Part Numbers (Components) – Sub Assemblies – Final Assemblies (Finished Goods) • In the next session, we will look at: – Revisions – ECOs (Engineering Change Orders) – Effects of change on MRP
  18. 18. Q&A www.rootstock.com 888.524.0123 marketing@rootstock.com
  19. 19. The ERP 101 Webinar Series Date Topic Aug 2, 2016 An Introduction to ERP for Manufacturing & Distribution Aug 16, 2016 Engineering Basics – The Importance of Part Master Records and Bills of Material Aug 30, 2016 Engineering Basics - Maintaining Accuracy through Revisions and Change Order Control TBA Shop Floor – Explore how ERP is used to create and maintain Work Centers, Routings and Procedures TBA Shop Floor – See how scheduling the Shop Floor through ERP controls Labor and Machines TBA Procurement – Link your Vendors and Purchased Parts via ERP TBA MRP – Step though an overview of this vital ERP subset TBA Sales – See how you can link your Customers and Products via ERP TBA Manufacturing Accounting – An overview using standard cost TBA Manufacturing Accounting – An overview using weighted cost Sign Up Now

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