What we learned at EuroIA 2014

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Our UX Designer Nádia Ferreira attended this year's EuroIA conference in Brussels. This debrief offers a glimpse on the topics that were discussed and sums up our most important learnings.

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  • morning workshops (4hrs)

    light talks 5mins
    talks 20/30 mins
    opening. middle big talks

  • Famous people too!

    Kim Goodwin
    Steve portigal
  • People get surprised when i tell i ux the homepage the last.

    not every user checks the homepage - google keyword, fb shared article, etc
    focus on the flow and not on the less important page
    anyway all stakeholders of the client side want there photo on the homepage
    it is good that users leave the homepage. People leave the homepage via googd navigation
    many users will never see the homepage

    Designing the homepage first is like wrapping before having a gift.

    NF - Let’s stop with the homepage fetish.
  • People get surprised when i tell i ux the homepage the last.

    not every user checks the homepage - google keyword, fb shared article, etc
    focus on the flow and not on the less important page
    anyway all stakeholders of the client side want there photo on the homepage
    it is good that users leave the homepage. People leave the homepage via googd navigation
    many users will never see the homepage

    Designing the homepage first is like wrapping before having a gift.

    NF - Let’s stop with the homepage fetish.
  • Core pages - where users solve their taks and you reach your objectives.
    Therefore, Homepage is NOT a core page

    Use at worshop, for instance. Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts.pdf
    Step 1 - identify Core pages where Business goals and User tasks meet
    Step 2 - identify top task
    Step 3 - for each core model identify Inward paths - How will the user get there? how will they find this content?
    Step 4 - for each core model identify Core content - What content elements do we need to make sure the user solves their task while respecting our objectives?
    Step 5 - for each core model identify Outwards paths -After the user has solved their task, where do we want to send them next?
    Step 6 - Prioritise Core content and Outwards paths - Ex; use mobile analogy
  • Core pages - where users solve their taks and you reach your objectives.
    Therefore, Homepage is NOT a core page

    Use at worshop, for instance. Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts.pdf
    Step 1 - identify Core pages where Business goals and User tasks meet
    Step 2 - identify top task
    Step 3 - for each core model identify Inward paths - How will the user get there? how will they find this content?
    Step 4 - for each core model identify Core content - What content elements do we need to make sure the user solves their task while respecting our objectives?
    Step 5 - for each core model identify Outwards paths -After the user has solved their task, where do we want to send them next?
    Step 6 - Prioritise Core content and Outwards paths - Ex; use mobile analogy
  • Core pages - where users solve their taks and you reach your objectives.
    Therefore, Homepage is NOT a core page

    Use at worshop, for instance. Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts.pdf
    Step 1 - identify Core pages where Business goals and User tasks meet
    Step 2 - identify top task
    Step 3 - for each core model identify Inward paths - How will the user get there? how will they find this content?
    Step 4 - for each core model identify Core content - What content elements do we need to make sure the user solves their task while respecting our objectives?
    Step 5 - for each core model identify Outwards paths -After the user has solved their task, where do we want to send them next?
    Step 6 - Prioritise Core content and Outwards paths - Ex; use mobile analogy
  • Core pages - where users solve their taks and you reach your objectives.
    Therefore, Homepage is NOT a core page

    Use at worshop, for instance. Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts.pdf
    Step 1 - identify Core pages where Business goals and User tasks meet
    Step 2 - identify top task
    Step 3 - for each core model identify Inward paths - How will the user get there? how will they find this content?
    Step 4 - for each core model identify Core content - What content elements do we need to make sure the user solves their task while respecting our objectives?
    Step 5 - for each core model identify Outwards paths -After the user has solved their task, where do we want to send them next?
    Step 6 - Prioritise Core content and Outwards paths - Ex; use mobile analogy
  • Core pages - where users solve their taks and you reach your objectives.
    Therefore, Homepage is NOT a core page

    Use at worshop, for instance. Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts.pdf
    Step 1 - identify Core pages where Business goals and User tasks meet
    Step 2 - identify top task
    Step 3 - for each core model identify Inward paths - How will the user get there? how will they find this content?
    Step 4 - for each core model identify Core content - What content elements do we need to make sure the user solves their task while respecting our objectives?
    Step 5 - for each core model identify Outwards paths -After the user has solved their task, where do we want to send them next?
    Step 6 - Prioritise Core content and Outwards paths - Ex; use mobile analogy
  • Core pages - where users solve their taks and you reach your objectives.
    Therefore, Homepage is NOT a core page

    Use at worshop, for instance. Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts.pdf
    Step 1 - identify Core pages where Business goals and User tasks meet
    Step 2 - identify top task
    Step 3 - for each core model identify Inward paths - How will the user get there? how will they find this content?
    Step 4 - for each core model identify Core content - What content elements do we need to make sure the user solves their task while respecting our objectives?
    Step 5 - for each core model identify Outwards paths -After the user has solved their task, where do we want to send them next?
    Step 6 - Prioritise Core content and Outwards paths - Ex; use mobile analogy
  • New model story for ux reviews
    by David Fiorito
    Like a story: Plot become Flow/ context of use
    Characters become Persona
    Point of view becomes Heuristics narrative
    See/Think/Do with screenshots

    http://digitalanthropologist.com/docsNstuff/Heuristic%20Storytelling%20-%20David%20Fiorito%20EuroIA%202014.pdf
  • New model story for ux reviews
    by David Fiorito
    Like a story: Plot become Flow/ context of use
    Characters become Persona
    Point of view becomes Heuristics narrative
    See/Think/Do with screenshots

    FLOW To set the scene effectively, you must understand the context in which the software is used… and then you will be able to identify critical paths
    PERSONA You do not need a detailed persona – just a plausible sketch of a typical user. The stakeholders must recognize the user as one of their own. You need to know enough to understand why they are using the software you are designing and in what context.
    NARRATIVE The narrative is grounded in the heuristic categories, but those categories needed a slight tweak.replaced the categories from the card sorting exercise with phrases that would fit better in a narrative. Don’t panic, the detailed heuristics are still there. Just don’t reveal them to the audience


  • New model story for ux reviews
    by David Fiorito
    Like a story: Plot become Flow/ context of use
    Characters become Persona
    Point of view becomes Heuristics narrative
    See/Think/Do with screenshots

    FLOW To set the scene effectively, you must understand the context in which the software is used… and then you will be able to identify critical paths
    PERSONA You do not need a detailed persona – just a plausible sketch of a typical user. The stakeholders must recognize the user as one of their own. You need to know enough to understand why they are using the software you are designing and in what context.
    NARRATIVE The narrative is grounded in the heuristic categories, but those categories needed a slight tweak.replaced the categories from the card sorting exercise with phrases that would fit better in a narrative. Don’t panic, the detailed heuristics are still there. Just don’t reveal them to the audience


  • New model story for ux reviews
    by David Fiorito
    Like a story: Plot become Flow/ context of use
    Characters become Persona
    Point of view becomes Heuristics narrative
    See/Think/Do with screenshots
  • She also talked about how to change company culture from ux pov

    The Competing Values Framework, presented by Kim Goodwin
    "How we decide"
    design your design process and match different project management practices to fit the environment
    Clan - UX as Coaches/Facilitators - Skill building, Collaborators, Harmony Involvement, Slow, Everyone involved meetings with more people
    Adhocary - UX as Generalists / White board ninjas - Novelty, Experimentations, Hate Process, Not too structured, start up culture, use of white board for quick experiments
    Hierarchy - UX as Process and Design experts - Efficiency, Technical expertise, prevent failure, consistency, Checkins, styles guide, minimise disruption
    Market - Quantifiable results, assertiveness, beat competition Quantitate data driven, need of Proof, Measurements, minimise risk.

    Adhocracy culture
    Often found in startups, this kind of culture is constantly looking outside itself to learn. Processes and roles are flexible. There’s usually a lot of room for creativity, experimentation and risk-taking. The weak point of adhocracies is usually a lack of focus or clear ownership, which means it’s hard to get a decision and make it stick. Adhocracies love nothing better than a whiteboard ninja who can listen to users and internal stakeholders, then turn vague ideas into quick-but-concrete sketches. They’ll value your process skills for bringing order to the chaos, but only if it’s not called a ‘process’.
    Clan culture
    A clan culture is more focused on employee happiness and involvement than on the marketplace. Overt conflict is frowned upon. The design is pushed and pulled by multiple opinions before it eventually goes out the door. Frustrated designers often respond by keeping everyone out of the process, which only results in more explosions later on. Success in a clan means emphasising your role as a facilitator and coach. The fastest route to a decision that will stick really involves that huge group of people. This isn’t to say you should design by committee! Your best bet is to bring everyone out on field research to shake up the inward-facing perspective and build a shared understanding. If you don’t want ten-person design meetings, be sure to build in explicit checkpoints so everyone feels heard.
    Hierarchy culture
    Hierarchies value technical expertise, efficiency, consistency and compliance. A decisive leader in a hierarchy can move projects along quickly. Organisational silos and a focus on individual department efficiency tend to foster fragmented user experiences. Hierarchies like stability, so they may be slow to accept new ideas.Specs and process documents really do work. This is the only sort of culture where being an expert carries any weight. The key to success here is to be a good stakeholder stalker: learn how they make decisions; how and when they prefer to communicate; and what their big concerns are. Don’t accept organisational silos; use tools like scenarios to encourage a broader perspective.
    Market culture
    Market cultures are like adhocracies in that they focus on learning from the outside, but they’re much less likely to take a leap of faith. Markets like proof, preferably in the form of numbers, though they’ll sometimes believe it’s a good idea if competitors are doing it. The trickiest thing about design here is that you can’t prove you’re right before you at least test something.
  • Self-assessment http://smallworldalliance.com/

    How to deal with difs Social types
    Birgit Geiberger & Peter Boersma (UX Team of Two)
    Self-assessment http://smallworldalliance.com/
    Understand how to deal with different type of people
    Relater, Socialiser, Director and Thinker
  • Self-assessment http://smallworldalliance.com/

    How to deal with difs Social types
    Birgit Geiberger & Peter Boersma (UX Team of Two)
    Self-assessment http://smallworldalliance.com/
    Understand how to deal with different type of people
    Relater, Socialiser, Director and Thinker
  • Improve UX process
    Birgit Geiberger & Peter Boersma (UX Team of Two)
    Rethink deliverables and process:
    list current deliverables
    diagram deliverables in phases
    describe the input needed for a deliverable and what is the output generated
    present, dicuss and prioritise
    templates fo 80 % of the cases
    Repeat
    Improve it:
    "To improve X I will do X with X and change X before X."
  • Improve UX process
    Birgit Geiberger & Peter Boersma (UX Team of Two)
    Rethink deliverables and process:
    list current deliverables
    diagram deliverables in phases
    describe the input needed for a deliverable and what is the output generated
    present, dicuss and prioritise
    templates fo 80 % of the cases
    Repeat
    Improve it:
    "To improve X I will do X with X and change X before X."
  • why dont we have it yet?
    beyond interface, computer, flat design
    focus on real user interaction
  • Six things we still suck at plus four lessons to teach the kids by Abby http://abbytheia.com/2014/09/27/euroia/
    Design is invisible by Lutz Schmitt http://www.slideshare.net/daslutz/design-is-invisible-euroia-2014-brussels?ref=http://www.slideee.com/slide/design-is-invisible-euroia-2014-brussels
    Content against cancer by Ida Aalen http://iallenkelhet.no/2014/09/24/euroia2014-content-against-cancer/
    Well, we’ve done all this research, now what? by Steve Portigal http://www.slideshare.net/steveportigal/portigal-euro-ia-workshop
    Representing Information across channels by David Peter Simon http://www.slideshare.net/davidpetersimon/representing-information-across-channels
    Modeling Structured Content - IAS13 workshop http://www.slideshare.net/reduxd/modeling-structured-content-ias13-workshop
    End-users are not the only personas of your product or service by Karine Cardona http://fr.slideshare.net/KarineCardona/euroia-2014-personas-notonlyendusers
    Expert review of a website user experience context by Tom Van de Zande http://www.slideshare.net/tomvdz/expert-review-of-a-website-user-experience-context-euroia-2014
    The web you were used to is gone by Alberta Soranzo http://www.slideshare.net/atrebla/the-web-you-were-used-to-is-gone-euroia-2014?utm_content=buffere1e55&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
    Half designer, half politician by Clementina Gentile http://www.slideshare.net/gentilemc/euroia-clementina-gentile
    http://digitalanthropologist.com/docsNstuff/Heuristic%20Storytelling%20-%20David%20Fiorito%20EuroIA%202014.pdf
  • 5. Books and Articles referred

    Designing for People by Henry Dreyfuss Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1581153120
    Usable Usability: Simple Steps for Making Stuff Better by Eric Reiss Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1118185471
    Personal Styles & Effective Performance: Make Your Style Work for You by David W. Merrill et al. Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0801968992
    Positive Intelligence: Why Only 20% of Teams & Individuals Achieve Their True Potential & How You Can Achieve Yours by Shirzad Chamine Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1608322785
    The Service-dominant Logic of Marketing: Dialog, Debate, and Directions by Robert F. Lusch et al. Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/076561491X
    Pervasive Information Architecture: Designing Cross-Channel User Experiences by Andrea Resmini et al. Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0123820944
    Information Anxiety by Richard Saul Wurman http://books.google.be/books/about/Information_Anxiety.html?id=dKIVV_suO28C&redir_esc=y
    Information Anxiety 2 (Hayden/Que) by Richard S Wurman Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0789724103
    Designing for the Digital Age: How to Create Human-Centered Products and Services by Alan Cooper et al. Link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0470229101

    Fit’s law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitts's_law
    Lawrence, T. B., Dyck, B., Maitlis, S., & Mauws, M. K. 2006. The underlying structure of continuous change. MIT Sloan Management Review, 47(4): 59-66. Link http://www.sauder.ubc.ca/Faculty/People/Faculty_Members/Maitlis_Sally/~/media/Files/Faculty%20Research/OBHR%20Division/Maitlis/2006_lawrence2006.ashx
  • What we learned at EuroIA 2014

    1. 1. euroia 2014 Brussels, Belgium 25 – 27 September, 2014 DEBRIEF Nadia Ferreira
    2. 2. Impressions
    3. 3. Learnings
    4. 4. The homepage Eric Reiss
    5. 5. Homepage is not a core page Idea from Eric Reiss and Ida Aalen. ● User lands on a website via Google keyword search, Shared link, etc. ● Most of the users will never see the Homepage. ● Good navigation allows users to leave the homepage.
    6. 6. Homepage is not a core page Idea from Eric Reiss and Ida Aalen. ● User lands on a website via Google keyword search, Shared link, etc. ● Most of the users will never see the Homepage. ● Good navigation allows users to leave the homepage. “Designing the homepage first is like wrapping before even having a gift.” Ida Aalen
    7. 7. Core Model Ida Aalen
    8. 8. Core Model Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/ uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts. pdf A.K.A. Core & Paths, presented by Ida Aalen Where users solve their taks and you reach your objectives. Core pages
    9. 9. Core Model Template at http://iallenkelhet.no/wp-content/ uploads/sites/2/2014/05/Ida-Aalen-Core-page-handouts. pdf Step 1 - Identify Core pages where Business goals and User tasks meet Step 2 - Identify Users top tasks
    10. 10. Core Model 1 2 3 Step 3 How will the users get there? How will they find this content?
    11. 11. Core Model 1 2 3 4 Step 4 What content elements do we need to make sure the user solves their task while respecting our objectives?
    12. 12. Core Model 1 2 3 4 5 Step 5 After the user has solved their task, where do we want to send them next?
    13. 13. Core Model (in new page) 6 Step 6 Prioritise Core content and Outwards paths E.g. use mobile analogy
    14. 14. Throw heuristics evaluation to the fire David Forito
    15. 15. UX review as a Story Idea by David Fiorito ● Kill the long website reviews spreadsheets checklists. ● Story instead: Plot o -> Flow/ context of use Characters o -> Persona Point of view o -> Heuristics narrative
    16. 16. UX review as a Story Core User journey of what she: o Sees o Understands o Does Structure: o Persona presentation o Story case (Journey) o Strengths o Negative points o Screenshots o Recommendations
    17. 17. The competing values framework Kim Goodwin
    18. 18. The Competing Values Framework Presented by Kim Goodwin "How we decide" ● Clan - UX as Coaches Involvement, Slow, Everyone involved, meetings with more people ● Adhocary - UX as Generalists Hate process, not too structured, start-up culture, use of white board for quick experiments ● Hierarchy - UX as Process & Design experts Check-ins, styles guides, minimise disruption ● Market - UX as Scientists Quantitate data driven, in need of proof, measurements, minimise risk.
    19. 19. Social types Birgit Geiberger - UX team of two
    20. 20. Social types Presented by Birgit (UX team of two) Relater ● “I feel” ● People-oriented, Slow Pace ● Issues: Reluctant to change, avoid risks, undisciplined in use of time Socializer ● “I want” ● People-oriented, Fast Pace ● Issues: Personal opinion decisions, little concern for details, struggle with commitment Director ● “I will” ● Task-oriented, Fast Pace ● Issues: Forcefull, impatient, do not show emotions Thinker ● “I think” ● Task-oriented, Slow Pace ● Skeptical, critical, avoid risks, study before opinion
    21. 21. Social types How to communicate with: Relater ● Develop relationship. Spend time. ● Inform early about changes. Socializer ● Show appreciation and support ● Don’t ignore them Director ● Provide options and benefits ● Clear, short, precise. Get to the point Thinker ● Give a lot of information beforehand. ● Provide deadlines and time to process ● Dont misinterprect lack of enthusiam.
    22. 22. Improve UX process Peter Boersema - UX team of two
    23. 23. Improve UX process Presented by Peter Boersma (UX Team of Two) Rethink deliverables and process: 1. List current UX deliverables 2. Diagram deliverables in phases 3. Describe the input needed for a deliverable and what is the output generated 4. Present, discuss and prioritise 5. Templates for 80 % of the cases 6. Repeat
    24. 24. Improve UX process Communicate Roadmap ● Company / Product
    25. 25. Challenges
    26. 26. Improve UX process Objectives ● Identiy who can influence the UX of a project. ● Understand who are the people to communicate the UX process inside the organization.
    27. 27. UX, UI and what it matters “Don’t be stuck with the UI. There is more than that. Look around and design the present, the interaction.” Petr & Jiri
    28. 28. UX, UI and what it matters “Don’t be stuck with the UI. There is more than that. Look around and design the present, the interaction.” Petr “Maybe UX is just Educated Marketing” Lutz Schmitt
    29. 29. UX, UI and what it matters “Don’t be stuck with the UI. There is more than that. Look around and design the present, the interaction.” Petr “Maybe UX is just Educated Marketing” Lutz Schmitt “IA, we still suck at it.” Abby C.
    30. 30. Slide decks
    31. 31. Talks and Workshops Links in presentation notes
    32. 32. Books and articles
    33. 33. Readings Amazon links in presentation notes
    34. 34. Thanks! C-MINE 1 BUS 13 Evence Coppéelaan 91 3600 Genk Belgium Phone +32 89 20 15 00 Fax +32 89 20 15 01 Info@nascom.be

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