Coming to European Competence Standards for the Practice of Career Guidance and Counselling 
Johannes Katsarov, Jukka Lerk...
Overview 
1.Purposes and Goals of the European Competence Standards (Johannes Katsarov) 
2.Professional Functions and Meas...
Purpose and Goals of European Competence Standards 
Help to establish career guidance and counselling as a recognized pro...
Central Challenges in Developing Competence Standards 
For the development of competence standards, which will be accepted...
Criteria for the competence standards to be “fit for purpose” 
We need a comprehensive and concise statementabout the cor...
Our Basic Framework 
5 Professional Roles which Career Professionals work in: 
6 
6 Core Competences** which Career Profes...
7 
Competences= 
clusters of particular ... 
... which can be actualized to perform a certain professional 
function up to...
Approach: 
To have a performance-based argumentation we have defined “professional functions” for each of the “profession...
Three Types of Career Professionals and Levels of Competence 
We have agreed on 3 generic types of career professionals in...
Relation of the Three Types of Career Professionals to Clients 10 
Client 
Immediate advice in personal context (e.g. at w...
Three Levels of Competence… 11 
Career Guidance Counsellor 
Career Advisor 
We acknowledge the need for career guidance co...
Questions for Discussion on European Competence Standards 
1.Collection: What are important questions that we need to disc...
Phillips 6 x 6 technique (Phillips, 1948) 13
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Defining European Competence Standards for Career Guidance and Counselling

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NICE aims at establishing "European Competence Standards" for the professional field of career guidance and counselling in Europe. The following presentation was offered by Johannes Katsarov (Heidelberg University), Prof Dr Kestutis Pukelis (Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas), Dr Jukka Lerkkanen (Open University of Jyvaskyla) and Dr Jacques Pouyaud (University of Bordeaux) at the European Summit on Developing the Career Workforce of the Future on September 4, 2014 at Canterbury Christ Church University (UK). The audience was made up of approximately 200 policy makers, career professionals, researchers, lecturers, citizen representatives, HR managers, and public employment service representatives from 32 European countries. The presentation relates to a draft for European Competence Standards, which was published by NICE in advance of the European Summit, and which can be downloaded on the network website at www.nice-network.eu

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Defining European Competence Standards for Career Guidance and Counselling

  1. 1. Coming to European Competence Standards for the Practice of Career Guidance and Counselling Johannes Katsarov, Jukka Lerkkanen, Jacques Pouyaud, and Kestutis Pukelis September 4th, 2014 –Canterbury (UK)
  2. 2. Overview 1.Purposes and Goals of the European Competence Standards (Johannes Katsarov) 2.Professional Functions and Measurable Competences –Central Definitions (Professor Kestutis Pukelis) 3.Three Types of Career Professionals and Three Levels of Competence(Dr Jukka Lerkkanen) 4.Objectives of the Workshop at the Canterbury Summit(Dr Jacques Pouyaud) 2
  3. 3. Purpose and Goals of European Competence Standards Help to establish career guidance and counselling as a recognized profession around Europe; a common professional identityof career professionals Assure the competence of career professionals around Europe, including people in supportive roles, as well as the quality of (initial + further) training Support the mutual recognition of qualifications and the recognition of prior learning in the field of career guidance and counselling, and improve basis for international cooperation and mobility in training and practice 3
  4. 4. Central Challenges in Developing Competence Standards For the development of competence standards, which will be accepted and used in practice, training and policy, we need a consistent frameworkof high quality. 4 The major challenge lies in developing a model, which is relevant for the labour market for CGC professionals, which links to the logic of higher education systems, and which fosters professionalization. These three dimensions can be understood as the corners of a perfecttriangle: It is very challenging to define a model, which relates to all of them in a balanced way. Ideal Model Political Need for Professionalization of Career Guidance and Counselling Structures of the Labour Market for Career Professionals (Roles & Functions) Structures of Higher Education System in Europe (Academic Cycles, Degrees)
  5. 5. Criteria for the competence standards to be “fit for purpose” We need a comprehensive and concise statementabout the core tasks of career professionals, which can be communicated well to lay-persons  what should people be able to expect from every personcalled a “career guidance counsellor”? We need a system which can offer a sensible differentiation between fully dedicated “career counsellors”, people dealing with career-related questions as part of other roles, and people in “specialist positions” We need a transparent and coherent frameworkof measurableand comparativecompetence levels The competences need to be meaningfulin relation to the most central professional challenges related to the career profession and center on performancein dealing with such challenges 5
  6. 6. Our Basic Framework 5 Professional Roles which Career Professionals work in: 6 6 Core Competences** which Career Professionals need for this: Career Counselling Competences Career Education Competences Career Systems Development Competences Career Service Management Competences Career Assessment & Information Competences Generic Professional Competences Career Counselling Career Education Career Systems Development Career Service Management Career Assessment & Information We distinguish between two aspects in our basic framework: CGC **Core Competences should be understood as fields of competence; not as measurable competences. *The Professional Roles together represent the central activities of career services and career professionals
  7. 7. 7 Competences= clusters of particular ... ... which can be actualized to perform a certain professional function up to defined standards. Performance in a professional function at defined minimum quality level (competence) Demonstration of particular knowledge, skills, values and attitudes Description of competence-based learning outcomes affective, behavioural and cognitive Our Understanding of Competence(s)
  8. 8. Approach: To have a performance-based argumentation we have defined “professional functions” for each of the “professional roles” and assigned them to one of the “levels”. The question was: What do people primarily do at this level in the relevant NICE role? In the next step, we have defined the “competences”, which people need to fulfil the relevant “professionals functions”. In doing so, we have used the Dublin/EQF descriptors and the Bloom taxonomy, as well as Moon’s instructions for developing level descriptors. Finally, we have identified “generic professional competences” and generic aspects of the “level of specialization”, which are of general/transversal relevance for all roles. In the Summit Materials, two tables can be found, which introduce the standards: The first table gives an overview of all of the professional activities, which we have identified, and where they are located (which role and level). The second table mirrors the first table, but offers only the competence descriptions. 8
  9. 9. Three Types of Career Professionals and Levels of Competence We have agreed on 3 generic types of career professionals in regards to the professional challenges connected with the different roles and the necessary level of competence needed for them: Career Advisorsare teachers, placement managers, psychologists, social workers or public administrators (among others). They are often the first people who clients come to for advice in career-related matters, although their area of specialization is not in career guidance and counselling, but in another field. Career Guidance Counsellors are the people, who are dedicated to career guidance and counselling and who see it as their vocation to support people in facing complex career-related challenges through career counselling, career education, career assessment & information, career systems development and by managing their career services professionally. Career Experts are specialized in one (or more) of the five professional roles and work towards the advancement of career guidance and counselling in different ways. Some of them primarily engage in research, academic training and developmental activities as academics. Others concentrate on more practical matters, e.g. the management of career services, policy-making or the supervision of other career professionals. 9
  10. 10. Relation of the Three Types of Career Professionals to Clients 10 Client Immediate advice in personal context (e.g. at work, in school) Accessible service specialized on career guidance and counselling Expert services for career guidance and counselling; least direct interaction with clients Career Advisor Career Guidance Counsellor Career Expert
  11. 11. Three Levels of Competence… 11 Career Guidance Counsellor Career Advisor We acknowledge the need for career guidance counsellors to work together with trained members of other professions and stakeholder groups, so to reach clients effectively General advice and career support should be provided by people who have basic training in career guidance and counselling, and who are closest to clients. Challenging career problems require support from competent practitioners, in order to secure quality of service provision Career guidance counsellors should have a sufficient level of competence to practice in all Professional Rolesautonomously and responsibly. Experts are needed for particularly complex tasks, for the innovation & development of practice, for research and training Experts should have a high level of competence for particular role, and for research, development and training. Career Expert …relate to the three types of career professionals. They build on each other sequentially:
  12. 12. Questions for Discussion on European Competence Standards 1.Collection: What are important questions that we need to discuss today regarding the development of the competence standards? (The joint formulation of good questions is more important than having immediate answers!) (Question collection 15 minutes) 2.Selection of questions for discussion in smaller groups: Please volunteer as a moderator, if you want to discuss a particular question with colleagues and „found“ a group this way. (Group formation 5 min) 3.Topic group discussions:Analyze the relevant problem/challenge behind the question, and try to work out possible solutions/ proposals to present in the plenary. (Time for group discussion 30 minutes) 4.Plenary presentations: Each group shares their proposed solutions and clarifies reasoning behind them (about 20 min) 5.Wrapping-up: We will use the remaining time to react as the coordinators of the project, to make suggestions for how to continue on this work, and collect some final comments 12
  13. 13. Phillips 6 x 6 technique (Phillips, 1948) 13

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