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Improving the Odds for Chartering Schools Serving High-Risk Youth

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This working session was facilitated by Leslie Talbot, who with members of the DC Association of Chartered Public Schools (DCACPS), discussed methods to improve the likelihood of authorizers' chartering schools serving high-risk youth. Key strategies include quantifying schools' key design elements to expose value-added. This slide presentation also includes post-session follow up information requested by participants.

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Improving the Odds for Chartering Schools Serving High-Risk Youth

  1. 1. Improving the Odds for Chartering Schools Serving High-Risk Youth Improving the Odds for Chartering Schools Serving High-Risk Youth A Working Session Facilitated by: Leslie Talbot January 16, 2018 In Washington, DC | For: DCPCSA Members A Working Session Facilitated by: Leslie Talbot January 16, 2018 In Washington, DC | For: DCPCSA Members
  2. 2. Why Schools Serving High-Risk Youth are not Granted Charters Or are not Renewed Why Schools Serving High-Risk Youth are not Granted Charters Or are not Renewed Often, schools and authorizers do not speak the same language. Try:  Using more quantitative and less anecdotal evidence of success  Measuring your school’s unique key design elements  Identifying your school’s value-added and establish/report on accountability measures that reflect these results  Frequent and diverse connections with your authorizer to ensure your authorizer understands your model  Creating a network of schools serving high-risk students with the same authorizer Often, schools and authorizers do not speak the same language. Try:  Using more quantitative and less anecdotal evidence of success  Measuring your school’s unique key design elements  Identifying your school’s value-added and establish/report on accountability measures that reflect these results  Frequent and diverse connections with your authorizer to ensure your authorizer understands your model  Creating a network of schools serving high-risk students with the same authorizer 2
  3. 3. The Importance of Aligning School Design Elements with Outcomes Data The Importance of Aligning School Design Elements with Outcomes Data Your data collection, analysis, and reporting should be both mission- and design-elements-aligned:  Know your typical student profile and track data specific to your population  Look at the academic and nonacademic strategies you employ  Quantify your model components – this is your value-added  Find and leverage the link between school design elements and outcomes data Your data collection, analysis, and reporting should be both mission- and design-elements-aligned:  Know your typical student profile and track data specific to your population  Look at the academic and nonacademic strategies you employ  Quantify your model components – this is your value-added  Find and leverage the link between school design elements and outcomes data 3
  4. 4. Evidence Of Value-Added when Students Enter Your Schools Off-Track Evidence Of Value-Added when Students Enter Your Schools Off-Track Be sure that your schools:  Have evidence-based design elements proven effective with high-risk student populations  Have future-focused design elements that demonstrate long- term achievements and positive outcomes  Create frameworks for academic and nonacademic measures to include absolute, growth and comparison measures  Use established metrics to measure academic and nonacademic indicators Be sure that your schools:  Have evidence-based design elements proven effective with high-risk student populations  Have future-focused design elements that demonstrate long- term achievements and positive outcomes  Create frameworks for academic and nonacademic measures to include absolute, growth and comparison measures  Use established metrics to measure academic and nonacademic indicators 4
  5. 5. Key Essentials For Chartering Schools Serving High-Risk Youth Key Essentials For Chartering Schools Serving High-Risk Youth  You’re a school, so yes, you must demonstrate academic achievement and value-added  Measure growth: both academic and nonacademic  Identify an accurate comparison measure or peer school(s) (i.e., don’t just use FRL)  Think longitudinally: Measure postsecondary success  You’re a school, so yes, you must demonstrate academic achievement and value-added  Measure growth: both academic and nonacademic  Identify an accurate comparison measure or peer school(s) (i.e., don’t just use FRL)  Think longitudinally: Measure postsecondary success 5
  6. 6. Next Steps: Improving Authorizer/Alternative Charter School Connections Next Steps: Improving Authorizer/Alternative Charter School Connections  Connect to the various education and youth development organizations (i.e., AAPF, JFF, Reengagement Network, etc.)  Extract key lessons from successes and failures of places like Colorado’s Alternative Education Campus’ (AEC’s), Philadelphia’s Renaissance Schools, innovative school models like HSRA, LEAD, and NYC’s Transfer Schools  Support each other through gatherings like these  Seek assistance as soon as it is needed  Connect to the various education and youth development organizations (i.e., AAPF, JFF, Reengagement Network, etc.)  Extract key lessons from successes and failures of places like Colorado’s Alternative Education Campus’ (AEC’s), Philadelphia’s Renaissance Schools, innovative school models like HSRA, LEAD, and NYC’s Transfer Schools  Support each other through gatherings like these  Seek assistance as soon as it is needed 6
  7. 7. Post-SessionPost-Session Follow Up Information Provided ParticipantsFollow Up Information Provided Participants 7
  8. 8. Frameworks to Measure SELFrameworks to Measure SEL Popular SEL frameworks are comprised of various youth, program and systems indicators or measures. Typical youth measures may include, but are not limited to self-awareness, social awareness and relationships, decision-making and choices, mindsets, and self-management. By establishing and aligning your SEL framework to your school’s design elements, you’ll be able to articulate wider evidence and rationale for your approach (i.e., program and systems measures). SEL frameworks we’ve seen in the schools and youth development programs with whom we work have included:  CASEL;  Every Hour Counts;  Habits of Success (we wrote a cross-walk between our client school’s design elements and those located within the table on slide 4)  Forum for Youth Investment Skill Areas;  Transforming Education’s MESH; and  CCSR Noncognitive Factors (document pages 8-14, chapter 2) Popular SEL frameworks are comprised of various youth, program and systems indicators or measures. Typical youth measures may include, but are not limited to self-awareness, social awareness and relationships, decision-making and choices, mindsets, and self-management. By establishing and aligning your SEL framework to your school’s design elements, you’ll be able to articulate wider evidence and rationale for your approach (i.e., program and systems measures). SEL frameworks we’ve seen in the schools and youth development programs with whom we work have included:  CASEL;  Every Hour Counts;  Habits of Success (we wrote a cross-walk between our client school’s design elements and those located within the table on slide 4)  Forum for Youth Investment Skill Areas;  Transforming Education’s MESH; and  CCSR Noncognitive Factors (document pages 8-14, chapter 2) 8
  9. 9. Metrics Used to Measure SELMetrics Used to Measure SEL As we discussed during our working session, it is important to align the metrics or surveys you use to your design elements, SEL framework (see article pages 5-10 for how-to’s), and student performance. For example, it’s great if students increase performance around self-management measures as evidenced by SEL metrics over time, however, can you attribute that growth to a reduction in disciplinary actions? Metrics we’ve seen employed by schools with whom we’ve worked include:  CASEL (You’ll have to join to garner access to sample surveys);  California Healthy Kids Survey, California School Staff Survey and California School Parent Survey (includes FAQs for implementing outside of California);  Habits of Success (using a Likert Scale);  Core SEL Metric;  SAYO and sample from Kentucky; and  Others (page 9). Lastly, we did not discuss digital platforms upon which to store the data you collect. Selection of the correct platform is very important. As we discussed during our working session, it is important to align the metrics or surveys you use to your design elements, SEL framework (see article pages 5-10 for how-to’s), and student performance. For example, it’s great if students increase performance around self-management measures as evidenced by SEL metrics over time, however, can you attribute that growth to a reduction in disciplinary actions? Metrics we’ve seen employed by schools with whom we’ve worked include:  CASEL (You’ll have to join to garner access to sample surveys);  California Healthy Kids Survey, California School Staff Survey and California School Parent Survey (includes FAQs for implementing outside of California);  Habits of Success (using a Likert Scale);  Core SEL Metric;  SAYO and sample from Kentucky; and  Others (page 9). Lastly, we did not discuss digital platforms upon which to store the data you collect. Selection of the correct platform is very important. 9
  10. 10. CONTACTS:CONTACTS: Ramona Edelin: redelin@dcpcsa.org Leslie Talbot: leslie@talbotconsulting.com Ramona Edelin: redelin@dcpcsa.org Leslie Talbot: leslie@talbotconsulting.com 10

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