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Swimming Pool Safety: Layers Of Protection That Every Parent (And Grandparent) Should Know About

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Swimming Pool Safety: Layers Of Protection That Every Parent (And Grandparent) Should Know About

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Drowning is the leading cause of death for young children. Swimming pools are the most common contributor. Learn how to keep pools safe for everyone,

Drowning is the leading cause of death for young children. Swimming pools are the most common contributor. Learn how to keep pools safe for everyone,

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Swimming Pool Safety: Layers Of Protection That Every Parent (And Grandparent) Should Know About

  1. 1. PRESENTED BY: Swimming Pool Safety: Layers Of Protection That Every Parent (And Grandparent) Should Know About
  2. 2. 1 Pamela Kramer, “Drowning Dangers: Keeping Kids Safe Near Water,” Parents Magazine, https://www.parents.com/baby/safety/outdoor/drowning-dangers-keeping- kids-safe-near-water/ (citing U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). 2 Pool Safely, “Drowning Deaths and Injuries Infographic,” https://www.poolsafely.gov/parents/safety-tips/drowning-deaths-and-injuries-infographic/ Drowning is the No. 1 cause of accidental death among children ages 1 to 3, and the second-leading cause of death among those ages 4 to 15. Approximately 800 children drown every year – enough children to fill 11 school buses.1 77% of these accidents happen in pools – in- ground pools, above-ground pools and even inflatable kiddie pools.2
  3. 3. Of course, the biggest way to prevent these tragic accidents? Constant adult supervision. Yet parents are human, and even the most attentive can have momentary lapses. That’s why you need multiple layers of protection.3 Layers like... 3 National Drowning Prevention Alliance, “Layers of Protection Around Aquatic Environments to Prevent Child Drowning,” March 25, 2011, http://ndpa.org/resources/safety- tips/layers-of-protection/
  4. 4. Physical Barriers • Isolation fencing should surround the pool, be at least 4-5 feet high and have a self-closing, self-latching gate that’s never propped open. • A retractable safety cover can act as another barrier, provided it’s specifically designed for that purpose. (A floating cover won’t cut it.) • A safety net may also be used, as long as it’s properly installed and put into place whenever the pool isn’t in use.
  5. 5. Alarms • Doors and windows leading to the pool area (including sliding doors) should be equipped with alarms to alert you when they’re left open. • Consider installing a pool alarm that uses infrared, motion or surface-tension sensors to detect unauthorized entry.
  6. 6. Swimming Lessons Teaching kids to swim from a young age reduces their vulnerability to drowning. However, these lessons can provide a false sense of security. Never leave children unsupervised around water, even if they know how to swim.
  7. 7. Emergency Preparedness • Keep rescue equipment such as a flotation ring and shepherd’s hook at the poolside. • Know CPR and rescue breathing for both kids and infants. • Install a landline phone for use in emergencies (in case cellphones aren’t easily accessible or don’t get signal). Post the address prominently near the phone. • Check the pool first whenever a child is missing. Every second counts. When all else fails, these measures can save a life.
  8. 8. At Ball & Bonholtzer, we’re committed to spreading the word and keeping kids safe. Contact our legal team to learn more about homeowner responsibility (and liability) when it comes to swimming pools and other hazards. © 2018 Ball & Bonholtzer. All Rights Reserved. Design and editorial services by FindLaw, part of Thomson Reuters.

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