Anzeige
Anzeige

Más contenido relacionado

Anzeige

The Topic of Witchcraft.pptx

  1. THE TOPIC OF WITCHCRAFT
  2. The History of Witchcraft Early witches were people who practiced witchcraft, casting spells and summoning spirits for assistance or change. The majority of witches were assumed to be pagans doing the Devil's bidding. On the other hand, many on the other hand, were simply natural healers or so-called "wise women" whose profession was misunderstood. It is unclear when witches first appeared in history, but one of the earliest records of a witch can be found in the Bible in the book of 1 Samuel, which is thought to have been written between 931 B.C. and 721 B.C. It tells the story of King Saul seeking the Witch of Endor to summon the spirit of the dead prophet Samuel to aid him in defeating the Philistine army. The witch awoke Samuel, who predicted the death of Saul and his sons. According to the Bible, Saul's sons died in battle the next day, and Saul committed suicide. Other Old Testament verses criticize witches, such as Exodus 22:18, which states, "thou shalt not allow a witch to live." Other Biblical passages warn against divination, chanting, or using witches to contact the dead.
  3. Malleus Maleficarum Witch hysteria really took shape in Europe during the mid-1400s, since many accused witches pleaded guilty to a variety of wicked behaviours, often under torture. Within a century, witch hunts were common, and the majority of those accused were burned at the stake or hanged. Single women, widows, and other marginalised women were particularly targeted. Between 1500 and 1660, up to 80,000 alleged witches were executed in Europe. Around 80% of them were women who were thought to be in agreeance with the Devil and full of lust. The highest rate of witchcraft executions was in Germany, while the lowest was in Ireland. The 1486 publication of "Malleus Maleficarum," written by two respected German Dominicans, likely fueled the spread of witch mania. The book, usually translated as "The Hammer of Witches," was primarily a guide about how to identify, hunt, and interrogate witches. "Malleus Maleficarum" declared witchcraft to be heresy and rapidly became the authoritative figure for Protestants and Catholics seeking to rid their communities of witches. Except for the Bible, the book remained popular in Europe for more than a century.
  4. Salem Witch Trials As witch hysteria faded in Europe, it grew in the New World, which was struggling from French-British wars, a smallpox epidemic, and the ongoing fear of attacks from neighbouring native American tribes. The tense atmosphere called for scapegoats. In 1692, the most well-known witch trials occurred in Salem, Massachusetts. The Salem witch trials began when 9-year-old Elizabeth Parris and 11-year-old Abigail Williams began having fits, body contortions, and uncontrollable screaming. As more young women began to show symptoms, there was mass hysteria, and three women were suspected of witchcraft: Sarah Good, Sarah Osborn, and Tituba, an enslaved woman controlled by Parris' father. Tituba admitted to being a witch and began accusing others of witchcraft. Bridget Bishop was hanged at the Salem gallows on June 10, becoming the first accused witch to be executed during the Salem Witch Trials. In the end, approximately 150 people were charged, with 18 being executed. The Salem Witch Trials did not only affect women; six men were convicted and executed as well. However, Massachusetts wasn't the only one of the 13 states to be obsessed with witches. Alse Young became the first person executed in America for witchcraft in 1647 in Windsor, Connecticut. Before Connecticut's final witch trial in 1697, forty-six individuals were accused of witchcraft in the state, with 11 being executed for the crime. People in Virginia were less concerned about witches. In fact, a law was passed in Lower Norfolk County in 1655 making falsely accusing someone of witchcraft a crime. Witchcraft remained a concern. Between 1626 and 1730, Virginia saw approximately two dozen witch trials (mostly of women). None of the defendants were executed.
  5. References • History.com Editors. (2017). History of Witches. [Online]. History. Last Updated: 20 October 2020. Available at: https://www.history.com/topics/folklore/history-of- witches#:~:text=Early%20witches%20were%20people%2 [Accessed 26 February 2023].
Anzeige