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Creating a Bilingual Early Childhood Program

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ICF's presentation, "Creating a Bilingual Early Childhood Program That Teaches with Passion and Follows Standards," examines strategies for adhering to standards while creating a community for growth in the classroom. ICF is committed to ensuring high-quality care and education for learners by advancing the professional development of those working in the education field.
The 2014 National Institute for Early Childhood Professional Development is an event that brings together early childhood professionals, program administrators, teacher educators, trainers, teachers, and researchers.
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Creating a Bilingual Early Childhood Program

  1. 1. “Creating a Bilingual Early Childhood Program That Teaches with Passion AND Follows Standards: Lessons Learned from the Teachers, Director, and Coach” Presented by Jacky Howell, MA coach/technical assistant, ICF Natalie LaRochelle-Eades, director CentroNía Arlene Alcazar, lead teacher CentroNía Beth Ann Moore, lead teacher CentroNía NAEYC PDI Institute, Minneapolis, MN 2014
  2. 2. SHARING OUR STORY! Jacky Howell, MA coach/technical assistant, ICF “What is lovely about children is that they can make such a big production, such a big deal, out of everything or nothing… I never want to be where I cannot see it. And that energy and foolishness, all that curiosity, all those questions, talk, fierce passions, inconsolable sorrows, immoderate joys, seem to many a nuisance to be endured, if not a disease to be cured. To me they are a national asset, a treasure beyond price.” --John Holt
  3. 3. SHARING OUR STORY! Natalie LaRochelle-Eades, director CentroNía “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel” - Maya Angelou
  4. 4. SHARING OUR STORY! Arlene Alcazar, lead teacher CentroNía “ Anything that is worth teaching can be presented in many different ways. These multiple ways can make use of our multiple intelligences.” Howard Gardner
  5. 5. SHARING OUR STORY! Beth Ann Moore, lead teacher CentroNía “The greatest sign of success for a teacher is to be able to say, ‘The children are now working as if I did not exist’” --Maria Montessori
  6. 6. WHO ARE YOU? •THE CHAIN GAME
  7. 7. GOOD MORNING TO YOU Natii Wright Good morning to you, how are you today? Good morning to you, I just want to say— Good morning…. Good morning… Sleepy eyes, open wide Come on in Start your day! Good morning to you, how are you today? Good morning to you, I just want to say— Good morning…. Good morning… (repeat) Sleepy eyes, open wide Come on in Start your day! Dance!! Sleepy eyes, open wide Come on in Start your day! Good morning…. Good morning…
  8. 8. WHO ARE WE?? CentroNía is a nationally recognized, multicultural learning community with a pioneering approach to bilingual education. For everyone, CentroNía offers a welcoming environment that encourages intellectual adventure and provides guidance each step of the way for children, youth and families to achieve their goals. We instill the love of learning for our children, families and staff. We seek to nurture this growth in an atmosphere of respect, innovation and collaboration.
  9. 9. AS A DC PRE-K PROGRAM WE ARE REQUIRED TO: Follow DC Early Learning Standards, follow Common Core Standards, follow DC Licensing Regulations, follow Creative Curriculum goals and objectives, follow NAEYC accreditation standards…
  10. 10. Knowledge of child growth and development is essential for program development and implementation. Young children learn by doing. Families are the primary caregivers and educators of their young children.
  11. 11. WHAT WE VALUE AT OUR PROGRAM: To meet the standards, our program creates a connected community of learners among teachers, children, and families. We believe that teaching young children involves educating the whole child. We create curriculum that reflects the interests and passions of the teachers as well as the developmental needs of the children.
  12. 12. “ Teaching is not just a profession, it’s a passion. Without passion for your subject and a desire for your children to learn and be the best in the world, then we have failed as a teacher and failure is not an option.” --John Podojil
  13. 13. IT’S ABOUT… CREATING COMMUNITY/CREANDO UNA COMUNIDAD CHILDREN AT THE CENTER/NIÑOS EN EL CENTRO HONORING TEACHERS/RECONOCIENDO A LOS MAESTROS CHILDREN
  14. 14. •CREATING COMMUNITY/CREANDO UNA COMUNIDAD FAMILIES CHILDREN TEACHERS ADMINISTRATORS NEIGHBORHOOD
  15. 15. AS YOU WOULD WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN… TREAT ADULTS….
  16. 16. •CHILDREN AT THE CENTER/NIÑOS EN EL CENTRO
  17. 17. •CHILDREN AT THE CENTER/NIÑOS EN EL CENTRO
  18. 18. •HONORING TEACHERS/RECONOCIENDO A LOS MAESTROS
  19. 19. “What’s love got to do with it? In a real sense, everything. When I bring my loves—my interests and passions—to the classroom I am able to convey a genuine enthusiasm for the topic at hand. This enthusiasm is the elixir that turns ordinary activities into compelling curriculum. If I hit upon an area that the children love— or come to love—we become bound together by our common interest. The classroom becomes a place where study and discovery are celebrated. And in the end it is this love of learning in general and passion for specific content areas that we are trying to nourish in our children. Love and wonder are the seeds of knowledge that will help children blossom into lifelong learners.” --Ben Mardell From Basketball to the Beatles: In Search of Compelling Early Childhood Curriculum
  20. 20. SHARING OUR STORY! Natalie LaRochelle-Eades, director CentroNía “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel” - Maya Angelou
  21. 21. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN Plan a nurturing environment for the adults.
  22. 22. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN Provide time and tools (resources).
  23. 23. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN View staff as competent thinkers and learners.
  24. 24. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN Think of HOW to support staff in their own personal growth.
  25. 25. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN Emphasize dispositions as much as skills and knowledge. Lilian Katz originally described dispositions as “relatively stable habits of mind” (Katz, 1979)
  26. 26. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN CORE DISPOSITIONS Delight in and be curious about children’s development Value children’s play Expect continuous change and challenge Be willing to take risks and make mistakes Reflect and self-evaluate Seek collaboration and peer support Actively advocate for children and appropriate teaching practices --Margie Carter/Deb Curtis
  27. 27. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN Uncover and cultivate passions.
  28. 28. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN Create a culture of curiosity, research, and storytelling.
  29. 29. “The truth is the better the environment is for the adults involved in the program, the better the care the children receive.”
  30. 30. COMMITMENT TO ACTION 2 things I can do to nurture community in my program… 2 things I can do to shift the focus from teaching to learning and keep children at the center… 2 things I can do to foster teachers growth in their work…
  31. 31. Beth Ann Moore, lead teacher CentroNía “The greatest sign of success for a teacher is to be able to say, ‘The children are now working as if I did not exist’” --Maria Montessori
  32. 32. The children guide my thinking and feed my enthusiasm…
  33. 33. 1 Involving home and school connection….
  34. 34. Involve learning through all curriculum areas
  35. 35. Designing areas for further exploration…
  36. 36. Using local resources for teaching…
  37. 37. Creating a long term project…
  38. 38. Thoughts on teaching from my passions…
  39. 39. SHARING OUR STORY! Arlene Alcazar, lead teacher CentroNía “ Anything that is worth teaching can be presented in many different ways. These multiple ways can make use of our multiple intelligences.” Howard Gardner
  40. 40. Literacy can take us anywhere…
  41. 41. Multiple ways of knowing culture…
  42. 42. Drawing can express our learning…
  43. 43. Purposefully thinking of development…
  44. 44. Play is THE way of learning…
  45. 45. Value and respect every home culture…
  46. 46. Cultural context as being meaningful learning…
  47. 47. Field trips/the community are important sources for learning…
  48. 48. Understand each child is unique…
  49. 49. COMMITMENT TO ACTION 2 things I can do to nurture community in my program… 2 things I can do to shift the focus from teaching to learning and keep children at the center… 2 things I can do to foster teachers growth in their work…
  50. 50. SHARING OUR STORY! Jacky Howell, MA coach/technical assistant, ICF “What is lovely about children is that they can make such a big production, such a big deal, out of everything or nothing… I never want to be where I cannot see it. And that energy and foolishness, all that curiosity, all those questions, talk, fierce passions, inconsolable sorrows, immoderate joys, seem to many a nuisance to be endured, if not a disease to be cured. To me they are a national asset, a treasure beyond price.” --John Holt
  51. 51. Includes building relationships…. Discovering WHERE is this teacher right now?
  52. 52. Using questions for discussion… Understanding reasons for choices
  53. 53. Empower rather than solve… Cultivating dispositions
  54. 54. TREAT ADULTS AS YOU WANT THEM TO TREAT CHILDREN CORE DISPOSITIONS Delight in and be curious about children’s development Value children’s play Expect continuous change and challenge Be willing to take risks and make mistakes Reflect and self-evaluate Seek collaboration and peer support Actively advocate for children and appropriate teaching practices --Margie Carter/Deb Curtis
  55. 55. Maintaining connection to the heart of this work… Providing resources and support
  56. 56. COMMITMENT TO ACTION 2 things I can do to nurture community in my program… 2 things I can do to shift the focus from teaching to learning and keep children at the center… 2 things I can do to foster teachers growth in their work…
  57. 57. “The key factor distinguishing good schools from truly exemplary schools is staffs’ willingness to look at their imperfections and create a climate of continual improvement.” --Sara Lawrence Lightfoot
  58. 58. “We want to know what the children think, feel, and wonder. We believe that the children will have things to tell each other and us that we have never heard before. We are always listening for a surprise and the birth of a new idea. This practice supports a mutual quest for understanding. It is a practice of searching together for new meaning. Together we become a community of seekers.” --Louise Boyd Cadwell
  59. 59. THANK YOU!! Feel free to contact us at: Natalie LaRochelle-Eades: neades@centronia.org Jacky Howell: jacky.Howell@icfi.com ENJOY THE REST OF THE CONFERENCE!!

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