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Assignemnt presentation skills english

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Assignemnt presentation skills english

  1. 1. Name : Dua Anees Roll no : 17718 Department :BSSE Section : C Assignment no 2 Question no 3:  How to deliver an efficient presentation? “Effective presentation skills are the ability to useyour voice confidently to communicate in “live” situations delivering information verbally and “physically,” being able to engage your audience, and thinking on your feet.” When we think of presentations, wetypically imagine standing in front of a room(or auditorium) full of people, delivering information verbally with slides projected on a screen. Variations of that scene are common.  Process for Planning, Organizing, and Writing Presentations: Similar to any other piece of writing or communication, to design a Successfulpresentation, you mustfollow a thoughtful writing process. Planning, drafting, and getting feedback on the presentation content, visuals, and delivery.
  2. 2. Step1: Identify and state the purpose of the presentation. Find focus by being able to clearly and simply articulate the goal of the presentation whatare you trying to achieve? This is helpful for you and your audience you will use it in your introduction and conclusion, and it will help you draftthe rest of the presentation content. Step2: Outline major sections. Next, break the presentation content into sections. Visualizing sections will also help you assess organization and consider transitions fromoneidea to the next. Plan for an introduction, main content sections that help you achieve the purpose of the presentation, and a conclusion. Step3: Draft content. Once you have an outline, it’s time to fill in the details and plan what you are actually going to say. Includean introduction that gives you a chance to greet the audience, state the purposeof the presentation, and providea brief overview of the restof the presentation .Help your audience follow the main content of the presentation by telling them as you movefrom one section of your outline to the next usethe structureyou created to keep yourself and your audience on track. Ending a presentation can be tricky, but it’s important becauseit will make a lasting impression with your audience don’tneglect to plan out the conclusion carefully. Step4: Write presentationnotes. For a moreeffective presentation style, write key ideas, data, and information as lists and notes. This allows you to ensureyou are including all the vital information without getting stuck reading a script. Your presentation notes should allow you to look down, quickly reference important information or reminders, and then look back up at your audience.
  3. 3. Step5: Designsupporting visuals. Now it’s time to consider whattypes of visuals will best help your audience understand the information in your presentation. Typically, presentations include a title slide, an overview or advanceorganizer, visualsupportfor each major content section, and a conclusion slide. Use the visuals to reinforce the organization of your presentation and help your audience see the information in new ways.  Characteristics of a Strong Presentation Style When it comes time to practice delivery, think aboutwhat has made a presentation and a presenter more or less effective in your past experiences in the audience. What presenters impressed you? Or bored you? What types of presentation visuals keep your attention? Or are more useful? One of the keys to an effective presentation is to keep your audience focused on what matters the information and avoid distracting them or losing their attention with things like overly complicated visuals, monotonedelivery, or disinterested body language.
  4. 4. As a presenter, you mustalso bring your own energy and show the audience that you are interested in the topic nothing is moreboring than a bored presenter, and if your audience is bored, you will not be successfulin delivering your message. Verbal communication should be clear and easy to listen to; non-verbal communication (or body language) should be natural and not distracting to your audience. The chartbelow outlines qualities of both verbal and non-verbal communication that impact presentation style. Use it as a sortof “rubric” as you assess and practice your own presentation skills. As you plan and practice a presentation, be aware of time constraints. If you are given a time limit , respect that time limit and plan the right amount of content. Check in withyour audience. Ask questions to make sureeverything is working Don’t get so lockedintoa script that you can’t improvise. You might need to respond to a question, take more time to explain a concept if you see that you’relosing your audience, or move through a planned section more quickly for the sakeof time. Havea plan and be able to underscorethe main purpose and messageof your presentation clearly, even if you end up deviating from the plan.
  5. 5. Expect technical difficulties. Presentation equipment fails all the time—the slide advancer won’twork, your laptop won’tconnect to the podium, a video won’tplay, etc. Obviously, you should do everything you can to avoid this by checking and planning, but if it does, stay calm, try to fix it, and be willing to adjustyour plans. You might need to manually advanceslides or speak louder to compensatefor a faulty microphone. Also, have multiple ways to access your presentation visuals Question no 2  How to improve presentation skills? If you have to give a presentation, does your mouth dry up and your heart start racing? Fear of public speaking or glossophobia is estimated to affect as many as 75% of people, making it one of the most common phobias. If you'reglossophobic you may try your best to avoid any situation where you have to speak in front of others. Unless you'rean experienced presenter you may worry that you'renot very good at public speaking or that your presentations aren't interesting, both of which can make you feel anxious about your performance. 1. Set your goals Ask yourself whatyou want to achieve with your presentation and how it's going to benefit your audience. Do you wantto useit to share information with others? Is it meant to update your audience or informthem aboutsome important news or decisions? Try to make sureyou know what your objectives are, and make sure your presentation achieves them clearly.
  6. 6. 2. Show some passion Your audience is morelikely to be engaged with what you'resaying if you can speak about it with passion and conviction. If you truly care about your presentation's subjectmatter, your enthusiasmwill shine through. Not only that, but speaking with passion can help to overcomenervousness becauseyou'llbe so absorbed in whatyou're saying, you won'thave time to worry abouthow you're being received. 3. Use personal stories Good public speakers know how importantstorytelling is for a successful presentation. But talking about yourself, such as including personalanecdotes to illustrate the points you'retrying to make, can be even more powerful. And as most people feel comfortabletalking aboutthemselves, it could help you relax more too. 4. Addsome humor Humor can endear you to an audience becauseit shows you don'ttake yourself too seriously. If you can make your audience laugh a few times they may also be more receptive to what you'resaying, which can help put you at ease. But avoid telling obvious jokes, as they can seem forced. Instead try to weavein a few humorous observations aboutyour job or the subjectyou're talking about. 5. Include take-home points Aim to makesure your audience doesn'tleave your presentation wondering what it was all about. Your take-home points are the ideas and messages you wantyour audience to go away with, the things you hope will make a lasting impression on them. Summaries your take-home points at the end of your presentation when you'rewrapping things up.
  7. 7. 6. Ask questions Try not to make your presentation one-sided. Involveyour audienceby asking them questions and encouraging them to participate. But make sureyour questions can be answered - the last thing you wantis for a question to be met with a wall of silence. Similarly, if someoneasks a question while you'respeaking, jump in straightaway - don't wait until the end of your presentation to answer it. 7. Be prepared Even the most confident and seasoned presenter can be thrown by unforeseen problems, especially when technology is involved. If you'reusing audio-visual aids, try to have a plan B in caseyour laptop crashes or your Wi-Fi connection vanishes. If you'rewellprepared, tech problems will be one less thing to worry about. 8. Practice - thenpractice again If you have time, practice your presentation as often as possible. Rehearse to the point that you'reso familiar with your subjectmatter, you could deliver your presentation with ease - like having a conversation with a friend. Also try to do at least one practice run in front of a friend or family member. 9. Visualize your success As well as practicing it's a good idea to visualizegiving a great presentation as it can help boost your confidence. Try to do this as many times as you can, and especially immediately before you give your presentation. If you'restill feeling nervous, try doing some deep breathing to bring down your heart rate.
  8. 8. 10. Don't talk on an empty stomach Always try to eat something before speaking in public. Itmay be the last thing you feel like doing if you're nervous, buthaving a light snack beforegiving a presentation can help make you more mentally alert. And if the thought of your presentation is really stressing you out, try having a burstof physicalactivity. Exercise helps your body useup stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol, so have a brisk walk or hit the gymbeforehand - it will make you feel much calmer.

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