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Restoration of Urban Blue Acres_Relevance of Global Outlook to HYD

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Restoration of Urban Blue Acres

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Restoration of Urban Blue Acres_Relevance of Global Outlook to HYD

  1. 1. Restoration of Urban Blue Acres: Relevance of Global Outlook to Hyderabad Department of Municipal Administration and Urban Development (MAUD), Government of Telangana &WRI India Ross Center N. Vijay Jagannathan Senior Fellow World Resources Institute Hyderabad, July 24 2019
  2. 2. Presentation Outline • Hyderabad’s Potentials to transform into a Global City • Value proposition for blue/green agenda • Circular Economy and Sponge City concepts • Suggestions for a Future Plan of Action
  3. 3. Hyderabad has the Potentials of becoming a Global City
  4. 4. Synergy between Urban Growth and the Green/Blue Environment
  5. 5. …Iff Water Resources are Managed Sustainably
  6. 6. Financial and Climate Costs change the Economic Calculus for WSS Projects For Hyderabad: • One kiloliter of Krishna bulk water (at a distance of 120 km) is five times greater than the cost of Osman Sagar and Himayath Sagar bulk water at less than 15 km. • Drop in groundwater in the city worsens as a result of increased runoff and reduced infiltration as the built-up areas rapidly expand Source: Presentation by M.G. Krishna 2008 for Hyderabad
  7. 7. Opportunity costs of tapping new water sources: Example from Chennai Source Cost (Rupees/m3) Quantity available (MLD) Comments Existing sources 2.5 100 Rainwater recharge improves yield Recycled treated wastewater 60 10 Green co-benefits (methane capture, urban forestry, industrial demand River Krishna 3 300 High Energy costs, GHG implications Tanks/aquifers 3 300 Rainwater recharge improves yield Palar river 8 10 Reduced availability to farmers Veeranam tank 15 80 Rainwater recharge improves yield Desalination 55 1200 High energy costs, GHG implications
  8. 8. Megacity & Global city Sao Paulo has 24/7 water supply, but…
  9. 9. California Economy Water-dependent but resilient
  10. 10. Presentation Outline • Hyderabad’s potentials to transform into a Global City • Value Proposition for Blue/Green agenda • Circular Economy and Sponge City concepts • Suggestions for a Future Plan of Action
  11. 11. Next Frontier: Digital Management of Resources Leverage Remote Sensing + Big Data Analytics Rainfall and ET “anomalies” can be converted into pixel- based quantifiable food losses because of urban prioritization of water use. Energy costs of lifting water can also be tracked electronicaly.
  12. 12. Value Proposition Three Pillars  Leverage Technology  Incentivize Innovations through creative PPPs + Finance Leverage  Build on stakeholder engagement for Quality of Life Focus Disruptive Solutions  No longer uni-functional (‘build’) and uni-disciplinary (‘engineering’) bureaucracy that Commands and Controls  HMWSSB and other agencies partner with water users, tech innovators to track groundwater changes, massively increase sector investments  Provide leaders with measurable outcomes that reduce water risks and minimize pollution costs, reported transparently Green + Blue = Smart City Goals Balance built and natural environment, regulate air, water and land pollution, improve quality of life
  13. 13. Invest in a Digital Platform for Tracking Water for ensuring Transparency, Accountability and ParticipationOperational Digital Platform: Tracks Sustainable Water Use
  14. 14. Presentation Outline • Hyderabad’s potentials to transform into a Global City • Value Proposition for blue/green agenda • Circular Economy and Sponge City concepts • Suggestions for a Future Plan of Action
  15. 15. Climate-friendly cities Capture GHGs from solid & liquid wastes Build sponge city to capture excess runoff Reuse wastewater Minimize water risks Minimize carbon footprint Operationalizing Circular Economy and Sponge City Concepts
  16. 16. Changing Paradigm because of Climate 1 Circular Economy Concept • Nature has no concept of wastes • Methane from treated sludge, septage and kitchen wastes produce renewable energy • Rainwater harvesting in Germany halves water bills • Urban non-potable water demand is substantial – industry and tree planting Sponge City Design • Built up areas harm ability of cities to store water • Drainage systems deprive storage • Aquifer recharge through latest rainwater harvesting techniques can be linked to tariffs • Storage opportunities are everywhere • Surface water bodies • Recharge of depleted aquifers • Invest in large diameter pipes:
  17. 17. Changing Paradigm because of Climate 2 Circular Economy Narrative Sponge City Narrative  1.6 meter diameter pipes buried 2 meters underground on roadside cost US$45,000 and hold 2000 cubic meters of water 0r US$25/cu meter Represents a fraction of highway construction costs or of pumping water from rivers Krishna or Godavari
  18. 18. Water with Large Footprint  Very Costly to Economy + Society Krishna river water Godavari river water Recyclable resources  Green Funds Treated wastewater Methane capture from sludge and organic wastes Local water sources  Regulations Surface water Groundwater Leverage Synergy between the Green and Blue Water Agenda
  19. 19. A Chinese Blue Water Economy Example: Zhuzhou City Sponge City Construction Plan • By 2020 more than 20% of the urban built-up area will meet the sponge city construction target requirements  More than 70% rainwater targeted for effective control; • By 2030, more than 80% of the urban built-up area will meet the construction target requirements  The annual total runoff control rate will reach 80%.
  20. 20. Presentation Outline • Hyderabad’s potentials to transform into a Global City • Value Proposition for blue/green agenda • Circular Economy and Sponge City concepts • Suggestions for a Future Plan of Action
  21. 21. Current Financing Model Not Sustainable Who pays for the Infrastructure? Operations & Maintenance Charged to users Deficit covered by State Govt. Replacement costs Recovered from charges Not recovered: Deferred Maintenance Interest payments Liability of water provider Liability of State Govt
  22. 22. Viability Gap Financing for Hyderabad’s Green & Blue Agenda? Invest ment Costs GHG Saving Reduc tion of water risks Public Health Cash flow E F A B C D 1. Investment costs > Cash flow from HWSSB consumers 2. Benefits from reduced water risks have social and global benefits C. Health benefits for residents from clean local air B. Benefits throughout Hyderabad through 24/7 water A. Global benefits because of GHG savings 3. Viability Gap: EF –D can be justified on health, environmental and global climate grounds for grant/concessional financing Averagecosts/benefits Population covered
  23. 23. RISK GOVERNANCE Risk appetite framework – STRUCTURAL VS NON-STRUCTURAL PRIORITIZATION Risk accountability – STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS - LIABILITY ASSIGNMENT Controls effectiveness – TECHNICAL AUDITS, FIDUCIARY OVERSIGHT Technology Applications – ICT, BIG DATA ANALYTICS USING CLIMATE MODELS Risk Transparency WATER & WASTEWATER DATA DISCLOSURE Risk transfer - INSURANCE A Water Risk Governance Framework can secure Financing Climate risk insurance availability  The canary in the coal mine! GOOD GOVERNANCE?
  24. 24. Example: Secure Climate Resilience Financing through Bond Issue PPP for building climate resilience Risk layering/risk transfer Insurance solutions to support adaptation and risk resilience Extreme weather events Insurance City level loss and damage Adaptation platform stakeholder Prevention linked with insurance Risk reduction
  25. 25. Questions?

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