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Part 5 Why Telemedicine is Changing The Healthcare Landscape

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Part 5 Why Telemedicine is Changing The Healthcare Landscape

  1. 1. PART 5 A SEVEN PART SERIES ON HOW HEALTHCARE IS TRENDING. AND, IT’S RIGHT IN THE PALM OF YOUR HANDS. _________________________________________________________________________ Why Telemedicine is changing the healthcare landscape and redefining the meaning of a Doctor’s “Office” visit. By Steve Okhravi, MD, MBA, CPE _________________________________________________________________________ PART 5 What is success in a simplified Telemedicine platform? So, I have presented a few ideas around behavior, adaptation, and technology intersecting or comingling with the healthcare consult. We can see that resistance, predetermined patterns and a properly launched solution could have the potential for a better for patient experience as it applies streamlining access to the healthcare professional; and facilitating the conversation to everyday symptoms. Identifying and outlining context and circumventing previous barriers is one part; yet delivering a solution is another. Let’s articulate the main idea of defining success for a community-oriented, democratized healthcare solution that’s managed remotely and patient initiated: There are two entities in the new order of the everyday consult: Media and Communities. Media thrives on content or “the Story” and Communities are built for Humans. The first entity: Media There is a fundamental premise about modern healthcare. Its value is rooted in improving the quality of life we live. That context around healthcare provisions is strengthened by:
  2. 2. 1) The consult experience; and 2) Understanding the effect of the experience: “feeling better than you did when you entered into the consult.” The “understanding” part results in a placebo effect. I.e., The more you know (and understand), the better you feel. The best Physicians (including their staff and partners) are connectors, not just benevolent individuals that “apply band-aids.” They’re connecting people around the story of wellness and the feelings around compassionate care. This is the magic of an efficacious consult and what medicine does when it operates at its best: they connect people around illustrative conversations (patient education) that lead to an improved sense of wellness. So, it’s no surprise that Telemedicine is a functional vehicle for wellness. The conversation, the story, the human exchange is facilitated and access, is enabled by the media (delivery mechanism). Time and space is of no consequence. The media (The App, the platform) enables accessible patient education that adds meaningful value to the quality of life experience. We consume healthcare based on three factors: 1. We
have
a
need
(wellness
or
lack
there
of)
and
respect
the
physician’s
skills.

 That
is,
they
have
the
information
and
knowhow
to
make
a
difference.
 2. Something
triggers
our
predisposition
towards
them.
We
become
aware
of
their
 story,
their
relevance
to
our
needs.
 3. They
provide
us
with
an
opportunity
to
engage
them.
Before
it
was
the
“Office
 Visit”
consult.
In
this
context,
it
is
the
immediacy
of
a
Smartphone
and
App
 initiation
made
consumable
by
new
media
communications.
 This is how the mobile communications industry was founded and made pervasive—by providing “one-on-one” conveniences Direct-To-Consumer. In short, the business value of any mass consumed activity, such as healthcare, is mainly based on referrals that are presently “socialized” by the Media awareness potential of the practitioner. So, to get this message, this story to you, we don’t sell technology, or healthcare--you already know the value provided there--we sell the story around the end benefit of the
  3. 3. solution. Healthcare sells healthcare through referrals and easy access. Added benefits like patient activated consults are icing on the cake. So, all things considered, you might be inclined to say: “this whole Telemedicine thing, which I thought was for someone else, may just as well benefit me, too.” It’s logical, rational, practical, easily-consumed, potentially a God-send regarding my quality of life and easy to understand. Media solutions have changed my life at rapid fire pace over the past 15 years. But I was able to keep up with it, despite the change that came with it. The economic value of these changes has also been obvious along with the instantaneous benefits gained by new media. So, this media machine has embraced the social impact of change resistance and provided me with reasons to get on board: 1. People
connect
and
communicate
because
of
the
conversations
that
have
been
 enabled
by
media
and
technology,
and
 2. The
more
people
that
connect
because
of
media
enablement,
the
more
valuable
 the
conversation
becomes,
triggering
network
effects.
One
world
really
is
enough
 for
all
of
us
once
we
align
and
streamline
our
interests
via
collaborative
 applications.
 Once media has been built upon the conversations around the “greater good”, it cannot be detached. (Is Facebook or Twitter going anywhere? Not soon, I suspect.) New media tools are a meaningful compliment to our lifestyles and cannot exist without the great content, self-actuated conversations and accessibility they are built upon. Needless to say, this story needs to be communicated properly to the people that would enjoy it. It would not be an exaggeration if I classified “Communication” as a separate Medium unto itself. However, stories never communicated (or, that don’t endure the course of time) maybe serve little practical purpose. That’s why Media and Communication are inextricably connected—and one could say that Communication is a sub-medium contained in Media. There are only two types of content of value available online: conversations, and the things about which the conversation takes place. Media Tools proliferate, however the construct remains incomplete unless you pair that with the second entity necessary to build movements. Communities Yes, physicians are connectors: they connect patients with resources, knowledge, the dialog around wellness and the ways and means to raise quality of life thru medical
  4. 4. practices to treat (or help prevent) ailments. Media can and does help propagate that conversation through networks. That network helps large groups of humans through shared intelligence. Or, in the new media vernacular: It’s all about (online) Communities and a platform to facilitate “the greater good” of shared intelligence. Physicians attract people around a path to an improved, empathic quality of life. They provoke patient’s respect and gratitude when the consult experience achieves its goals. This, in turn, yields good will and awakens sentiments of gratitude. This phenomenon has a multiplier effect when the patients have gathered in a shared utility (physical facility, community, App, platform, etc.) to enjoy the experience in a larger context. Whether it’s eight people, eighty people, 800 people or eight million people, the aura grows with replication of the positive experience. It’s the vibration and exchange of energy with people tuned into the same frequency. An online community can do that likely faster that any single construct in the physical world. This positivity defines the viral nature of communications online. Connect once--in a productive and life affirming, remarkable manner--and watch the experience repeat itself to grow exponentially. There are documented reports of YouTube content, attaining seemingly “overnight” sensations that move millions to act in unison. And, the conversation grows on its own strength. The power of positive outcomes lies in the activation of powerful community-shared experience. The more people exposed to streamlined, self-empowering solutions, the more valuable it becomes. 
 Community
effects
yield
widespread
benefits
that
are
part
of
the
Media
driven
 process;
exploiting
the
power
of
connections
and
connectivity
in
a
new
media
 environment.

 
 The
most
high‐valued
tech
companies
in
the
world
take
on
iconic
proportions.

 This
appeal
of
these
ideas
changes
procedures
and
processes
for
how
we
do
things. In the information era, we call them platforms. The Apple iOS is, obviously, a platform that has shaken the rafters of the computing industry: But, not simply, by Apple Computer per se. Let’s look at a tidal wave offshoot of this intelligence: iTunes is a platform. And, it changed the music industry, for all, forever. Facebook is a platform. It changes how we, inform, stay in touch and “share” with family and friends. We mentioned YouTube earlier. Twitter, Uber and AirBnB are platforms that evoked societal change. And, these platforms happily and handily circumvented our die- hard resistance to change for our own good.
  5. 5. Let’s look at the common links in these platforms? 1. Self­actuated
vehicles
for
sharing
intelligence:
 These
tools
don’t
create
their
content
on
any
“large
scale.”
However,
they
do
 connect
the
content
creators
with
the
content
consumers.
They
facilitate
both
 parties
to
keep
doing
so
and
make
the
information
of
the
platform
easy
to
find.
 2. Business
is
streamlined,
transacted,
and
real
time
needs
are
fulfilled
on
 these
platforms:

 YouTube
has
a
shared
ad
revenue
system.

 Facebook
enables
you
to
earn
income,
via
a
store
and
as
a
result
of
building
an
 audience.

 AirBnB
lets
you
rent
your
room.

 Apple’s
AppStore
(or
any
marketplace)
allows
you
to
innovate
to
create
previously
 unavailable
games
and
tools;
to
fill
human­need
gaps.

 (It
looks
like
that
is
where
DocChat
gets
its
lofty
goals
from.)
 3. More
common
than
ever,
the
platform
will
give
away
one
product
or
service
in
 order
to
attract
one
audience
and
ultimately
earn
revenue.
Free
in
platforms
 is
not
a
bad
thing—it’s
a
prerequisite
and
provides
a
path
to
profitable
activity
 around
societal
solutions.
 By doing so, platforms build their business model upon other people’s needs, activities and desire for transactional exchanges. Empowering entrepreneurs, consumers...some of which didn’t even start out with a profit motive but simply an idea for doing something better, more streamlined, more efficiently. To simplify, the masses use a platform, interaction soars, value is an opportunistic result because you touch large groups of people, positively. The platform profits everyone it touches if it starts out with a human premise to benefit improved quality of life! Networking effects in action is not a new concept by any stretch. Networking in new media with better ways to fill a gap in human needs for large groups of people, across cities, states and nations simply adds a multiplier effect that is undeniable. So, onto DocChat. In a real world scenario, platforms beat products every time. It’s based on an economy of scale, self-determination and empowerment. As I said earlier, the Bricks and Mortar office visit has an undeniable place in modern medicine for certain indications. It is, however, somewhat of “transactional product” when it comes to common, low-grade ailments, and everyday instances of not feeling well. It’s also bound by the location and hours/schedules of the local practice.
  6. 6. Let’s look at the ultimate Branded Platform: Apple = Apps opened the door for game developers to create app games thus connecting them to a global audience through the AppStore. Apple = iPhone devices: Winning big; positioning them as being way ahead of the pack. Apple = itunes: Changing the music industry in one fell swoop. (Remember…they started out as computer/operating system makers of the computer designed for the “rest of us.” It’s no wonder Apple stood with this mass appeal strategy as a mission statement for unmitigated success.) Now it’s high time that the approach to healthcare solutions democratizes itself: The Wellness Conversation can be a platform upon which… 1) A serious business can be built; 2) People can connect in bold new ways around the corner, around the country, around the world; 3) It is activated in real time, real fast with rewarding experiences in each session; and 4) Done so, at “popular, contained price point” that has real mass appeal. If we learn of a streamlined conversation that improves our quality of life, gives us the power to initiate that discussion any place and anytime at a reasonable cost, like DocChat, wouldn’t joining the platform be a “no-brainer”? These concepts are undeniably attractive. They are compelling and exciting to me as a long time healthcare professional that has paid his dues, learnt some solid lessons and at the ready to apply them to a fun venture that does real good for the patients I so value. In fact, launching DocChat is a labor of love of medicine, people and good practice as opposed to a profit motive. That said, this premise also makes good business sense on all accounts… for patients, for payers, for practitioners, and for partners. There is a simple reason for my confidence in this endeavor: Building success stories and building communities is at the heart of this initiative. That’s why I believe the DocChat Platform is purely positioned for success… (Cont’d on Part 6) Dr. Okhravi's deep credentials have made him the perfect candidate for creating and leading Emergency Medical Care facilities in NYC. This novel Urgent Care facility is dedicated to the NYC communities that EMC serves. In his professional CV you'll find an uncanny blend of healthcare practice, process and work flow savvy, along with exceptional hospital, ER and business management skills. This convergence of skills formed EMCs best practices and stand-alone ER healthcare knowledge based on practical, progressive, efficient, and compassionate urgent care principles.

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