Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.
Gamification of Older Adults’ Physical
Activity: An Experimental Study
Dennis L. Kappen, Dr. Pejman Mirza-Babaei, Dr. Lenn...
When I feel like exercising, I lie down until the
feeling passes
- Robert M. Hutchins
Image credit – ArchieComics.com
1. Engagement and interest in performing
physical activity (PA) was facilitated by
technology over an eight-week period
2....
Motivations for the Research
4
“Everything for everybody is nothing for nobody”
- Philip Kotler
5
Research
Questions
• What are the intrinsic and extrinsic affordances
that foster PA among older adults’?
Image credit –...
6
Experimental
Study
• Synchronous, three condition
1. gamified (Spirit50.com)
2. non-gamified
3. control
• Eight-week stu...
7
Experimental
Study
• Quantitative Data
• 80 data points/group
• Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) (45 Item, 7
dimensi...
8
Image credit – David Marcu –unsplash.com
Results
(Qualitative)
Categories Axial codes
Motivation for PA Aging well, chal...
9
Results
(Quantitative - PNSE)
• PNSE scale showed significance (p <0.5) for
• perceived competence (H(2) = 28.77)
• perc...
10
Image credit - https://c1.staticflickr.com/4/3873/14589702095_6097ab9d46_b.jpg
• IMI scale showed significance (p <0.5)...
11
Image credit – David Marcu –unsplash.com
A Theory of Motivational Affordances for
Older Adults’
• Older adults are inte...
Contribution:
Adaptive Engagement using Gamification: 1
• Attainable goals
• Challenges mirroring
ability
• Choice of exer...
Contribution:
Adaptive Engagement using Gamification: 2
• Attainable rewards
• Highlighting
achievements
• Intangible rewa...
Contribution:
Adaptive Engagement using Gamification: 3
• Correctness of form
• Encouragement through
praise
• Performance...
• Tailoring gamified technology for PA can be
achieved by
• Addressing the needs and wants of the older
adult demographic ...
1/14/2018 Dennis L. Kappen 16
.com
Thank You
dennis.kappen@humber.ca
Don’t Sit Still – Be Active
www.gamefulplay.ca
@3D_id...
Nächste SlideShare
Wird geladen in …5
×

#Gamification of Older Adults’ Physical Activity: An Experimental Study (HICSS-51-2018)

404 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

Designing fitness programs to combat a sedentary lifestyle and foster older adults’ motivation and goal-setting is not yet well-understood beyond point-based systems. To improve older adults’ (over 50 years) health and wellness, we studied a gamified physical activity intervention over eight weeks in an experiment (N=30) with three conditions (gamified, non-gamified, control). Our qualitative analysis showed the gamified group exhibited more engagement and interest in performing physical activity facilitated by technology. Results from our quantitative analysis indicated significance in the perceived competence dimension compared to the non-gamified and the control group. Perceived autonomy was significant for the non-gamified group against the control group. The findings from the quali-tative and quantitative analysis show motivation, enjoyment, and engagement were higher in the gamified group. This provides support for successfully facilitating older adults’ physical activity through gamified technology, which helped us create guidelines for older adults’ adaptive engagement.

Veröffentlicht in: Technologie
  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

#Gamification of Older Adults’ Physical Activity: An Experimental Study (HICSS-51-2018)

  1. 1. Gamification of Older Adults’ Physical Activity: An Experimental Study Dennis L. Kappen, Dr. Pejman Mirza-Babaei, Dr. Lennart E. Nacke Twitter: @3D_ideation 1
  2. 2. When I feel like exercising, I lie down until the feeling passes - Robert M. Hutchins Image credit – ArchieComics.com
  3. 3. 1. Engagement and interest in performing physical activity (PA) was facilitated by technology over an eight-week period 2. Gamified technology fostered perceived competence and perceived autonomy 3. Guidelines for adaptive engagement of older adults PA using gamification 3 Takeaways
  4. 4. Motivations for the Research 4 “Everything for everybody is nothing for nobody” - Philip Kotler
  5. 5. 5 Research Questions • What are the intrinsic and extrinsic affordances that foster PA among older adults’? Image credit – Terrell Woods–unsplash.com • Can PA technology be tailored to adapt to older adults’ motivation?
  6. 6. 6 Experimental Study • Synchronous, three condition 1. gamified (Spirit50.com) 2. non-gamified 3. control • Eight-week study • Participants • Active older adults (50+) • Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) • International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) • 10 participants/group Image credit – Julie Macey–unsplash.com
  7. 7. 7 Experimental Study • Quantitative Data • 80 data points/group • Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) (45 Item, 7 dimensions) • Psychological Need Satisfaction in Exercise (PNSE) (24 item, 3 dimensions) • Qualitative Data • 100 Interviews and email responses • Grounded theory method (Charmaz, 2006) Image credit – Julie Macey–unsplash.com
  8. 8. 8 Image credit – David Marcu –unsplash.com Results (Qualitative) Categories Axial codes Motivation for PA Aging well, challenged by activity, easy access to resources, enjoying outdoors, experience… Setting up goals Combining exercise types, committing time for activity, enjoying combination of activities… Feeling of accomplishment Adding new challenges, influencing activity through app, completing difficult challenges… Fears and barriers Challenging health conditions, fearing inability, fearing appearance issues… Rewards and PA Completing an activity, freedom of usage, having intangible rewards, having tangible rewards… Tracking of PA Challenging tracking issues, indicating completion status, improving body form
  9. 9. 9 Results (Quantitative - PNSE) • PNSE scale showed significance (p <0.5) for • perceived competence (H(2) = 28.77) • perceived autonomy (H(2) = 8.76) • perceived relatedness (H(2) = 17.60) • Jonckheere-Terpstra test, revealed rising medians towards the gamified group (1) for • perceived competence (J = 6491, z = -5.33, r = -.34) • perceived relatedness (J = 8064, z = -2.63, r = -.17) Image credit - https://media.defense.gov/2016/Oct/12/2001646678/670/394/0/161008-F-MD915-084.JPG
  10. 10. 10 Image credit - https://c1.staticflickr.com/4/3873/14589702095_6097ab9d46_b.jpg • IMI scale showed significance (p <0.5) for • interest/enjoyment (H(2) = 12.45) • perceived competence (H(2) = 39.65) • effort/importance (H(2) = 6.21) • perceived choice (H(2) = 12.5) • value/usefulness(H(2) = 6.43) • Jonckheere-Terpstra test, revealed rising medians towards the gamified group (1) for • interest/enjoyment (J = 7602, z = -3.42, r = -.22) • perceived competence (J = 5824, z = -6.46, r = -.41) • effort/importance (J = 8272, z = -2.28, r = -.14) • perceived choice (J = 11616, z = 3.45, r = .22) • value/usefulness (J = 8116, z = -2.60, r = -.16) Results (Quantitative - IMI)
  11. 11. 11 Image credit – David Marcu –unsplash.com A Theory of Motivational Affordances for Older Adults’ • Older adults are interested in various aspects of gamified technology because specific elements within the system provided advantages such as: • keeping on track with regular PA • ability to recognize their limitations with exercise intensities • challenge themselves to do more • feel validated for their efforts • be rewarded for their task completion stages.
  12. 12. Contribution: Adaptive Engagement using Gamification: 1 • Attainable goals • Challenges mirroring ability • Choice of exercise types • Choice of intensity adjustments • Increased agency • Inspiring curiosity • Interjecting unpredictability • Facilitating spontaneity and instantaneous gratification • Freedom of usage and habit formation • Facilitating competency • Social facilitation Intrinsic Motivation Elements 12
  13. 13. Contribution: Adaptive Engagement using Gamification: 2 • Attainable rewards • Highlighting achievements • Intangible rewards • Tangible rewards • Validation of efforts • Progression reflecting ability • Progression reflecting efforts Extrinsic Motivation Elements 13
  14. 14. Contribution: Adaptive Engagement using Gamification: 3 • Correctness of form • Encouragement through praise • Performance characteristics • Onboarding and education • Visual representation of progression Feedback Cycle Elements 14
  15. 15. • Tailoring gamified technology for PA can be achieved by • Addressing the needs and wants of the older adult demographic (Kappen et al., 2016) • Enabling customization and personalization of motivational affordances by using the adaptive engagement guidelines 15 Conclusion
  16. 16. 1/14/2018 Dennis L. Kappen 16 .com Thank You dennis.kappen@humber.ca Don’t Sit Still – Be Active www.gamefulplay.ca @3D_ideation Imagecredit-Scott-Webb–unsplash.com

×