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LHCb - UT poster CHRISTINE- FINAL

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LHCb - UT poster CHRISTINE- FINAL

  1. 1. Upstream Tracker for the LHCb Experiment UpgradeChristine Tran | Advisor: Ray Mountain Syracuse University | High Energy Physics LHC: Large Hadron Collider Based on the border of Switzerland and France, at over a hundred meters deep underground and over 27 kilometers in length, the LHC is the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world. The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) built the LHC. It brings particles to the highest energy ever achieved under laboratory conditions, and at near the speed of light, particles are smashed to replicate conditions of the Universe in its infancy (10-10 seconds old). There are many detectors and experiments on the LHC, one of which is the LHCb Experiment. LHCb Experiment The LHCb Experiment studies particles containing b-quarks in order to understand their production and decay. These states also help us to understand the phenomenon of CP Violation, which provides a possible explanation of the apparent preference of matter over anti-matter in the universe. The LHCb detector measures the particles created in proton-proton collisions. This involves recording the energy, momentum and position of particles as they pass through the detectors that make up the experiment. The LHCb is very large in scale, but must also be precise and accurate in its detection particles. The LHCb is composed of many different sub-detectors. LHCb Upgrade: The UT Tracker UT Construction The UT Tracker, will replace the TT in the LHCb upgrade. The UT is a silicon strip tracker, which will be fast (40 MHz readout electronics), have full solid angle coverage (with no gaps), and will be light (~4.5% radiation length). Such a modern particle detector has many challenges in its design and construction. The Problem We need to tile a plane with silicon sensors in a way that is efficient for tracking. There needs to be no gaps in the construction and no loss of efficiency. The sensor needs to operate at high voltage and function properly in a nominal environment of -5 degrees Celsius. They need to be held in place with low mass supports, and known to a precision of 10 microns. They need to be instrumented with electronics. How does one build such a thing? The Solution The planes will be made of staves, which will hold individual modules consisting of silicon sensors and other delicate electronics. If the staves are stiff and lightweight, and contain the capability of cooling the electronics, it will provide a stable design solution. Module:  Low density; lightweight (low radiation length)  Holds sensors to stave without shifting; robust  Stiffener added to hold sensor and ASICs securely, to keep wire bonds intact  Epoxy will need to hold, but also be thermally conductive and reworkable Stave:  Lightweight but also stiff in structure; robust  CFRP facings with a core structure of carbon foam and Rohacell for a sandwich structure  Cools down the modules with an inner titanium cooling tube  cFoam in core has a high thermal conductivity  Symmetrical  Both sides covered in modules to maintain thermal balance  Minimal bending or warping due to thermal expansion The Design Mock-ups of all components are built to be tested for mechanical, thermal, and electronic issues. In my work with the HEP group, I build the mock-ups that will be tested. The focus is on the precision placement of component parts for each of the designs tested and developing the construction techniques that are the most efficient. We are focused on the tracking detectors which measure the positions of the particles as they fly out from the collision point. The Vertex Locator measures the actual interaction point and the close-by region. The TT Tracker measures the particle trajectories before the magnet, and the T Trackers measure after the magnet. Together, they provide a measurement of the momentum of the particle. The LHCb is going through an upgrade with the main goal of collecting more data in order to improve its measurement precision. This will be accomplished by improving the luminosity, the speed of the readout electronics and software trigger. Module and Stave Construction: Multiple designs and iterations of each design. Epoxy Application: Evolution of the application from syringe to stencil. References: • LHCb Tracker Upgrade Technical Design Report, LHCb Collaboration, CERN/LHCC 2014-001 • http://lhcb.web.cern.ch/lhcb/ • http://hepoutreach.syr.edu/HEP_Tour/index.html • http://www.phy.syr.edu/~raym/edu/undergrad-projects.html Prototype #1 Prototype #3

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