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5s and kaizen

5s and kaizen

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5s and kaizen

  1. 1. 5S METHODOLOGY
  2. 2. 5S is the name of a workplace organization method that uses a list of five Japanese words: seiri, seiton, seiso, seiketsu, and shitsuke.
  3. 3. The list describes how to organize a work space for efficiency and effectiveness by identifying and storing the items used, maintaining the area and items, and sustaining the new order. 
 The decision-making process usually comes from a dialogue about standardization, which builds understanding among employees of how they should do the work.
  4. 4. SORT
  5. 5. • Remove unnecessary items and dispose of them properly. • Make work easier by eliminating obstacles. • Reduce chance of being disturbed with unnecessary items. • Prevent accumulation of unnecessary items. • Evaluate necessary items with regard to cost or other factors. • Remove all parts not in use. • Segregate unwanted material from the workplace. • Need fully skilled supervisor for checking on regular basis. • Don't put unnecessary items at the workplace & define a red- tagged area to keep those unnecessary items. • Waste removal.
  6. 6. SET IN ORDER
  7. 7. • Arrange all necessary items so they can be easily selected for use • Prevent loss and waste of time by arranging work station in such a way that all tooling / equipment is in close proximity • Make it easy to find and pick up necessary items • Ensure first-come-first-served basis • Make workflow smooth and easy • All above work should be done on regular basis
  8. 8. SHINE
  9. 9. • Clean your workplace completely • Use cleaning as inspection • Prevent machinery and equipment deterioration • Keep workplace safe and easy to work • Keep work place clean and pleasing to work in • When in place anyone not familiar to the environment must be able to detect problems in 5 seconds within 50 feet.
  10. 10. STANDARDIZE
  11. 11. • Standardize the best practices in the work area. • Maintain high standards and workplace organization at all times. • Maintain orderliness. Maintain everything in order and according to its standard. • Everything in its right place. • Every process has a standard.
  12. 12. SUSTAIN
  13. 13. • To keep in working order • Also translates as "do without being told” • Perform regular audits • Training and Discipline • Training is goal oriented process. Its resulting feedback is necessary monthly
  14. 14. 5S APPLICATIONS 5S methodology has expanded from manufacturing and is now being applied to a wide variety of industries including health care, education, and government. Although the origins of the 5S methodology are in manufacturing, it can also be applied to knowledge-economy work, with information, software, or media in the place of physical product.
 
 Examples of companies using 5S methodology are Infineon Technologies and Nonin Medical
  15. 15. • 5S was developed in Japan and was identified as one of the techniques that enabled Just in Time manufacturing.
 • Two major frameworks for understanding and applying 5S to business environments have arisen, one proposed by Osada, the other by Hirano. 
 • Hirano provided a structure for improvement programs with a series of identifiable steps, each building on its predecessor. 
 • As noted by John Bicheno,Toyota's adoption of the Hirano approach was '4S', with Set in order and Shine combined. THE ORIGIN OF 5S
  16. 16. KAIZEN MODEL
  17. 17. • Kaizen in Japanese means "improvement." Kaizen refers to activities that continuously improve all functions and involve all employees from the CEO to the assembly line workers.
 • It also applies to processes, such as purchasing and logistics, that cross organizational boundaries into the supply chain.
 • It has been applied in healthcare, psychotherapy, life-coaching, government, banking, and other industries. • By improving standardized activities and processes, kaizen aims to eliminate waste. 

  18. 18. • Kaizen is most commonly associated with manufacturing operations, as at Toyota, but has also been used in non-manufacturing environments.
 • At Toyota, it is usually a local improvement within a workstation or local area and involves a small group in improving their own work environment and productivity. 
 • This group is often guided through the kaizen process by a line supervisor; sometimes this is the line supervisor's key role.

  19. 19. • Kaizen on a broad, cross-departmental scale in companies, generates total quality management, and frees human efforts through improving productivity using machines and computing power.
 • Kaizen methodology includes making changes and monitoring results, then adjusting. • Large-scale pre-planning and extensive project scheduling are replaced by smaller experiments, which can be rapidly adapted as new improvements are suggested.
  20. 20. Cycle of Kaizen activity
  21. 21. Plan ahead for change. Analyze and predict the results • Establish the objectives and processes necessary to deliver results in accordance with the expected output.
 • By establishing output expectations, the completeness and accuracy of the spec is also a part of the targeted improvement. 
 • When possible start on a small scale to test possible effects.
  22. 22. • Implement the plan, execute the process, make the product.
 • Collect data for charting and analysis in the following "CHECK" and "ACT" steps. Execute the plan, taking small steps in controlled circumstances.
  23. 23. Check, study the results. • Study the actual results and compare against the expected results (targets or goals from the "PLAN") to ascertain any differences.
 • Look for deviation in implementation from the plan and also look for the appropriateness and completeness of the plan to enable the execution, i.e., "Do".
 • Charting data can make this much easier to see trends over several PDCA cycles and in order to convert the collected data into information. 
 • Information is what you need for the next step "ACT".
  24. 24. Take action to standardize or improve the process • If the CHECK shows that the PLAN that was implemented in DO is an improvement to the prior standard, then that becomes the new standard for how the organization should ACT going forward. 
 • If the CHECK shows that the PLAN that was implemented in DO is not an improvement, then the existing standard will remain in place.
 • In either case, if the CHECK showed something different than expected, then there is some more learning to be done... and that will suggest potential future PDCA cycles.
  25. 25. – Daily routine management-for the individual and/or the team – Problem-solving process – Project management – Continuous development – Vendor development – Human resources development – New product development – Process trials Benefits of PDCA Cycle
  26. 26. • As a model for continuous improvement.
 • When starting a new improvement project.
 • When developing a new or improved design of a process, product or service.
 • When defining a repetitive work process.
 • When planning data collection and analysis in order to verify and prioritize problems or root causes.
 • When implementing any change. When to Use Plan–Do–Check–Act
  27. 27. 1. Plan. Recognize an opportunity and plan a change. 2. Do. Test the change. Carry out a small- scale study. 3. Check. Review the test, analyze the results and identify what you’ve learned. 4. Act. Take action based on what you learned in the study step: If the change did not work, go through the cycle again with a different plan. Plan–Do–Check–Act Procedure
  28. 28. T.H.A.N.K.Y.O.U JennyParitosh Sreyashi Vaishnavi MubashshirLaxmi Noorain

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