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Intersubjectivity.pptx

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Intersubjectivity.pptx

  1. 1. Intersubjectivity is a philosophical concept of interaction between the “self” and the “other”. It is mutual recognition of each other as persons. It refers to shared meanings constructed by people in their interactions with each other. It refers to shared awareness, and understanding among persons. It is made possible by the awareness of the self and the other. Intersubjectivity is comprise of three groups of letters and/or words, namely: a. inter = this is a prefix which means “among and between” b. subject = this refers to a person or thing that is being discussed with c. -ity = a suffix used to form nouns which expresses state or condition
  2. 2. From this, we can conclude that intersubjectivity means a condition of relationship between subjects or persons. For example, if I relate with a friend and he or she relates back to me, intersubjectivity occurs. Philosophically, this means that when the Self recognizes the Other and the Other recognizes the Self, intersubjectivity happens. Intersubjectivity also carries the meaning of a unique relationship between separate individuals or subjects. When we say unique, we are referring to the relationship that a human person may experience when he or she engages in a very intimate and personal relationship with others. For example, when a person loves others, he or she gives himself or herself to them and at the same time receives them into his or her life. This mutual self-giving and receiving becomes possible because of the person’s inner life or interiority (panloob na buhay) where his or her thoughts, feelings, inner struggles, reactions, and the like “resides.”
  3. 3. Intersubjectivity or the Self-Other interaction comes in two levels, which are: a. First Level = this refers to the simple awareness of the Self about the existence of the Other. b. Deeper Level = this refers to the awareness of the Self as being seen by Others These actions of presenting yourself in a certain way when dealing with others or your social context is what we referred to as seeming. “Seeming” may behave in two forms: a. Positive Seeming – the pleasant behavior we showed when we are in a sacred or in the presence of a very important person. b. Negative Seeming – being “plastic,” “sipsip” or when expressing manipulative behaviors to promote selfish interests.
  4. 4. Intersubjectivity is universal. It exists when and where humans exist. It is an undeniable reality which thinkers could not help but discuss. Here are some philosophers who took philosophical inquiry on intersubjectivity:
  5. 5. Confucius (551-479 B.C.E.) A Chinese teacher and philosopher. One of the main ideas of Confucianism is Ren or “human-heartedness.” It is a virtue central to man that can be found in his sociality or intersubjectivity. In his philosophy, Confucius stresses order and harmony in the world. His aims can be achieved achieved through practical, concrete, particular, and perceptual ways. This means Confucian thinking on intersubjectivity is practical humanism. There is an emphasis on human actions in sociality. He calls every man to love the other through actions, not through thoughts.
  6. 6. Martin Buber (1878-1965) A Jewish philosopher who introduced the “I-Thou” and “I- It” relationships to embody his philosophy of intersubjectivity. For Buber, we have to treat another person as a subject (a being different from things or objects). Persons are not inanimate objects to be used. They have their own mind and free will, thus, we have to respect others as we respect ourselves. “I” refers to the self and “Thou” or “You” refers to others. This “I- Thou” relationship is the most meaningful relationship in the realm of humanity. The “I” is the same with the “Thou” and there should be mutual relationship between them. We can only recognize the self in the context of the other. This is a “person-to-person” relationship, “subject-to- subject” relation. We need to accept, respect, be sincere, and have dialogue with the other.
  7. 7. Karol Wojtyla (1920-2005) He is also St. John Paul II but as a philosopher, we use his real name. For Wojtyla, human action is the foundation of our being. But human reality is also about being with others, so our actions are also directed towards others. This form of action is now called “Participation.” In the theory of participation, man has the capacity to share himself to others. This affirms the reality that man acts and exists with others. He is a member of the community of persons, a community of “I-You” or “We.” Since man is a a member of this community, his experience with others gives him meaning and allows him to create meaning with with others.
  8. 8.  Authentic dialogue is a form of interpersonal communication which occurs when people recognize that they are part of a greater whole and can relate with others within the whole.  In some cases, non-verbal dialogical relations are not only the more appropriate means of conversation, but considered as a more profound form of conversation. The deeper and more genuine interaction is called dialogue. A genuine dialogue is attained when all of the following conditions are present: a. When the Self realizes that the Other is a unique or distinct person; b. When the two individuals begin to view each other as an Other; c. When the two persons truly acknowledging the presence of each other.
  9. 9. Ordinarily, we understand dialogue as having any conversation with someone. However, it does not always follow that because when you are talking with someone, you are already in dialogue with him or her. Philosophically, a dialogue can only occur when the words uttered and/or the and gestures performed are rooted in one’s inner life orinteriority. That is why, beings with interiority (panloob na buhay) are capable of engaging in dialogue. Here, a person’s words, expressions, and body language becomes the way by which he or she is able to express a part of himself or herself to another person. On the other hand, the person is also capable here of receiving the words, thoughts, emotions, and ideas of another person. A dialogue, therefore, happens when two persons “open up” to each other and give and receive one another in their encounter.
  10. 10. Thank you!!!

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