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Symposium of Dietary Intakes - Malaysia - April 2016

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Veröffentlicht am

International Life Sciences Institute "Symposium on Dietary Intakes"
This symposium aimed to:
1. Discuss current development and process for improving and expanding the Food Composition Databases in SE Asia Region
2. Share experiences, development and international best practice in dietary assessment methodology
3. Update on the latest findings from food consumption survey data in selected SE Asia countries
4. Discuss gaps, barriers and opportunities in the collection, analysis and interpretation of food consumption survey data in SEAsia

Veröffentlicht in: Lebensmittel
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Symposium of Dietary Intakes - Malaysia - April 2016

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. “Key Findings of Recent Food Consumption and Nutrition Surveys in ASEAN” - Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey (MANS)2014 2 Presenter : Mohamad Hasnan Bin Ahmad Nutritionist Institute For Public Health Ministry of Health 50590 Jalan Bangsar, Kuala Lumpur
  3. 3. 3 • An understanding of common types of food consumed is crucial to identify the population’s food choices • Food consumption data provide an estimation on the quantity of each prepared food consumed by individuals • The food consumption data vary considerably from country to country and even within a country due to variations in sociodemographic and socioeconomic status such as ethnicity, geographical areas, age, sex and income (Malik et al., 2013) Introduction
  4. 4. 2 4 • The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that each countries should estimate their own food consumption pattern data. • This is because the data can be used for a variety of purposes such as examining the dietary pattern, evaluating the frequency of food intake, assessing adequacy of nutrient intake, as well as establishing policies and recommendation. • In Malaysia, nationwide food consumption data have been collected in Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey (MANS) in 2003 and 2014. Introduction
  5. 5. 5 General objectives To evaluate the food consumption intake of the Malaysian adult population Specific objectives 1.To determine the top ten foods frequently or regularly consumed by Malaysian adult population 2.To determine the changes in top ten foods frequently or regularly consumed with the previous study (MANS 2003) 3.To determine daily intake of energy, macro- and micro- nutrients 4.To determine the changes in daily intake of energy, macro- and micro- nutrients with the previous study (MANS 2003) Objectives
  6. 6. 6 • MANS was a nationwide cross-sectional study conducted in March until June 2014. • Multistage stratified sampling design was used to select a representative sample of Malaysian adult population, aged 18 to 59 years old. • Data on food consumption were derived from : 1. Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) which contains 165 common consumed foods/ beverages 2. One day 24-hour diet recall. • NutriPro and Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) softwares were used for nutrient and statistical analyses. Methodology
  7. 7. 5 7 Key Findings MANS 2014 Figure 1. Prevalence of the top ten foods consumed among Malaysian adult population
  8. 8. 6 8 Key Findings Table 1. Comparison of prevalence and mean intake of the top ten foods consumed among Malaysian adult between MANS 2003 and MANS 2014 MANS 2003 MANS 2014 Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) Cooked rice 97.5 289.7 Cooked rice 98.4 279.6 Green leafy vege. 95.7 50.7 Hen egg 95.2 31.0 Marine fish 94.7 60.7 Green leafy vege. 94.8 69.7 Hen egg 93.4 25.2 Chicken 94.5 35.0 Chicken 92.8 31.7 Marine fish 93.5 50.1 Local kuih 92.5 21.6 Local kuih 79.9 28.2 Noodles 92.1 66.3 Bread 78.3 36.6 Mee-hoon/ kuew- tiaw 90.6 66.6 Mee-hoon/ kuew- tiaw 77.5 84.3 Bean vege. 89.7 16.4 Noodles 76.8 84.0 Cabbage 88.5 18.2 Soy sauce 76.6 7.7 Coo Mee tia Loc
  9. 9. 9 Figure 2. Prevalence of the top ten foods consumed daily among Malaysian adult population Key Findings MANS 2014
  10. 10. 10 Urban Rural Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) White rice 86.9 206.4 White rice 96.3 280.4 Sugar 50.5 9.3 Sugar 68.1 14.3 Leafy green vege. 44.6 50.0 Marine fish 42.6 190.4 Marine fish 23.6 126.8 Leafy green vege. 39.9 48.1 Chilies 23.5 8.9 Condensed milk 27.4 39.2 Condensed milk 21.8 32.5 Chilies 25.8 9.3 Soy sauce 20.6 5.5 Soy sauce 20.6 6.4 Chicken 14.3 66.2 Local kuih 17.5 46.5 Hen egg 14.1 29.4 Condiment 16.8 5.7 Condiment 13.7 4.2 Anchovy 16.3 4.7 Table 2. Comparison of prevalence and mean intake of the top ten foods consumed daily in the urban and rural area in MANS 2014 Key Findings MANS 2014
  11. 11. 9 11 Men Women Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) White rice 92.6 270.5 White rice 86.8 183.8 Sugar 58.2 12.4 Sugar 53.3 9.1 Leafy green vege. 39.8 48.8 Leafy green vege. 46.8 50.3 Marine fish 28.3 148.6 Marine fish 30.5 143.8 Condensed milk 26.2 42.2 Chilli 25.4 9.5 Chilli 23.1 8.6 Condensed milk 20.6 26.2 Soy sauce 21.0 5.9 Soy sauce 19.5 5.6 Hen egg 18.1 35.7 Cream cracker 16.8 9.1 Chicken 15.1 72.0 Condiment 14.4 4.6 Condiment 14.8 4.7 Full cream milk 14.3 4.3 Table 3. Comparison of prevalence and mean intake of the top ten foods consumed daily by men and women in MANS 2014 Key Findings MANS 2014
  12. 12. 10 12 Key Findings MANS 2003 MANS 2014 Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) Food Items Prevalence (%) Mean intake (g/day) White rice 97.2 289.7 White rice 89.8 297.9 Sugar 60.4 60.7 Sugar 55.9 25.5 Marine fish 40.9 11.6 Leafy green vege. 43.2 118.6 Leafy green vege. 40.0 50.6 Marine fish 29.4 102.6 Condensed milk 35.3 29.6 Chilies 24.2 25.8 Bread 17.1 36.1 Condensed milk 23.5 50.7 Full cream milk 17.1 18.5 Soy sauce 20.3 18.0 Biscuits 16.3 21.63 Condiment 14.6 19.4 Hen Egg 12.6 4.9 Hen egg 14.2 85.2 Anchovy 11.9 4.9 Cream crackers 12.9 43.4 Table 4. Comparison of prevalence and mean intake of the top ten food consumed daily among Malaysian adult between MANS 2003 and MANS 2014
  13. 13. 13 Table 6. Prevalence and mean intake of top ten beverages consumed daily among Malaysian adult population No. Beverages Prevalence ml/day 1 Plain water 90.3 1688 2 Tea 36.6 359 3 Coffee 26.4 356 4 Malted drink (milo, horlick, etc) 14.6 284 5 Pre-mixed drink (3 in 1) 9.0 314 6 Fruit juice 3.5 273 7 Soy milk 2.6 272 8 Cordial syrup 2.4 321 9 Ready to drink beverage (air kotak, air tin etc) 2.1 287 10 Pre-mixed herbal drink (3 in 1 with herbal) 1.5 281 Key Findings MANS 2014
  14. 14. 14 Findings MANS 2003 89.7% Malaysian adult consumed plain water daily with mean intake 1519ml/day MANS 2014 90.3% Malaysian adult consumed plain water daily with mean intake 1688ml/day
  15. 15. 15 Key Findings Figure 4. Median energy intake per day of Malaysian adult by strata 1540 1512 1575 1466 1510 1428 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 Malaysia Urban Rural Energy(kcal/day) MANS 2003 MANS 2014
  16. 16. 14 16 Key Findings Figure 5. Median energy intake per day of Malaysian adult by gender 1540 1722 1400 1466 1489 1445 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 Malaysia Men Women Energy(kcal/day) MANS 2003 MANS 2014
  17. 17. 17 Key Findings 58.53 54.12 14.31 15.2 26.78 28.93 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 MANS 2003 MANS 2014 Percentage(%)contributiontoenergy Carbohydrate Protein Fat Figure 6. Percentage (%) contribution macronutrient to daily energy intake.
  18. 18. 18 Key Findings Figure 7. Percentage achievement of selected nutrient to Malaysia Recommended Nutrient Intake 70 95 43 40 55 68 64 98 44 78 56 89 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Energy Protein Calcium Iron Vit C Vit A %RNI Nutrient MANS 2003 MANS 2014
  19. 19. 17 19 Key Findings 2293 2321 2283 1935 2026 1822 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Sex Combined Urban Rural Sodiumintake(mg/day) MANS 2003 MANS 2014 Figure 8. Sodium intake per day among Malaysia adult by strata
  20. 20. 18 20 Key Findings 2293 2584 2072 1935 1970 1914 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Sex Combined Men Women Sodiumintake(mg/day) MANS 2003 MANS 2014 Figure 9. Sodium intake per day among Malaysia adult by gender
  21. 21. 21 • Several food items were consumed daily and weekly by Malaysian adult population, which consists of diversity of types of food consumed • There was almost similar food patterns reported in current MANS 2014 with previous MANS 2003’s food consumption pattern, but an increase consumption of “processed foods” such as soy sauce & condiments was observed • Higher consumption of “processed foods” added with salts and unhealthy condiments increases the likelihood of unhealthy eating pattern such as higher intake of food consumed (Brondel et al., 2009) Discussion
  22. 22. 22 ß Malaysians had an energy intake that met only 64% of RNI which is 6% lower compared to MANS 2003. ß The percentage contribution of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate and fat) are within the recommended ratios. ß Intake of micronutrients in relation to RNI could be described as low particularly for calcium and vitamin C intake. ß For sodium, the median intake was 1935mg/day which is on par with cut-off 2000mg/day as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Discussion
  23. 23. 21 23 • Majority of the Malaysian adults consumed white rice daily with an average intake 2 ½ plates per day • Compared with MANS 2003, consumption of “processed foods” added with salt and condiments had increased and it is appear among the top ten most consumed foods. • Generally, most of nutrient intake by Malaysian adult show the positive trend in term of achievement to RNI except for energy. Conclusion
  24. 24. 22 24 • An increasing trend of “processed foods” added with salts and condiments among adults in Malaysia is of concern and alternative healthier condiments and low salt processed foods should be recommended • Regular nutrition surveys should be carried out to provide valuable information on trends in food and nutrient intake among Malaysian population. Recommendation
  25. 25. 25 1. Malik, V. S., Pan, A., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2013). Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in children and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 98(4), 1084-1102. 2. Wessex Institute of Public Health Medicine, 1993. Software Package for Food Frequency Questionnaire. 3. A Karim, N., Mohd Yusof, S., Hashim, J. K., Din, M., Haslinda, S., Harun, Z., ... & Sulong, F. (2008). Food consumption patterns: findings from the Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey (MANS). Malaysian Journal of Nutrition, 14(1), 25-39. 4. Habitual Food Intake od Adults Aged 18 to 59 Years. Report Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey 2003. Ministry of Health Malaysia. 5. Tee, E. (2011). Development and promotion of Malaysian dietary guidelines.Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, 20(3), 455. 6. Brondel, L., Romer, M., Van Wymelbeke, V., Pineau, N., Jiang, T., Hanus, C., & Rigaud, D. (2009). Variety enhances food intake in humans: role of sensory-specific satiety. Physiology & Behavior, 97(1), 44-51. References MANS
  26. 26. 26 I would like to thank the Director General of Health of Malaysia for permission to present this finding. Our special appreciation goes to all the respondents their willingness to participate in this study. Not forget many thanks to all data collectors and team members for Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey (MANS) 2014. MANS 2014 General Finding Food Security Meal Pattern Food Intake by Food GROUP Habits to Relation to Food Consumption Food Labelling Nutrient Intake Nutritional Status Vitamin & Mineral Suplements Food Habit Acknowledgment MANS
  27. 27. 25 27 For the details data and information in every scope, kindly refer to the MANS 2014 report available in IKU website (http://www.iku.gov.my/). MANS 2014 General Finding Food Security Meal Pattern Food Intake by Food GROUP Habits to Relation to Food Consumption Food Labelling Nutrient Intake Nutritional Status Vitamin & Mineral Suplements Food Habit MANS 2014
  28. 28. 26Intake 28 THANK YOU MANS 2014 General Finding Food Security Meal Pattern Food Intake by Food GROUP Habits to Relation to Food Consumption Food Labelling Nutrient Intake Nutritional Status Vitamin & Mineral Suplements Food Habit
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