Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Die SlideShare-Präsentation wird heruntergeladen. ×

3 Myths of Customer Experience

Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Anzeige
Wird geladen in …3
×

Hier ansehen

1 von 44 Anzeige

3 Myths of Customer Experience

Herunterladen, um offline zu lesen

I have given this presentation at two separate events: once at the UK Usability Professionals' Association and once at PRODUCTtank London. In the piece I present '3 Myths of Customer Experience' which seek to address some of the biggest red herrings in UX today. Ultimately, I want to turn 'myths' into 'truths', introduce my definition of Experience Strategy as well as the notion of key 'Aspects of the Experience'.

I have given this presentation at two separate events: once at the UK Usability Professionals' Association and once at PRODUCTtank London. In the piece I present '3 Myths of Customer Experience' which seek to address some of the biggest red herrings in UX today. Ultimately, I want to turn 'myths' into 'truths', introduce my definition of Experience Strategy as well as the notion of key 'Aspects of the Experience'.

Anzeige
Anzeige

Weitere Verwandte Inhalte

Diashows für Sie (19)

Andere mochten auch (19)

Anzeige

Ähnlich wie 3 Myths of Customer Experience (20)

Aktuellste (20)

Anzeige

3 Myths of Customer Experience

  1. 1. 3 MYTHS OF CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE photo: flickr markjsebastian
  2. 2. 2
  3. 3. 3 MYTHS OF CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE 3
  4. 4. myth #1 You can design experiences. 4
  5. 5. This isn’t a new argument, but it’s an important one. 5
  6. 6. customer |kuhsˈ-tuh-mer| noun a person who purchases goods or services experience |ikˈspi(ə)rēəns| noun an event or occurrence that leaves an impression 6
  7. 7. customer |kuhsˈ-tuh-mer| noun a person who purchases goods or services experience |ikˈspi(ə)rēəns| noun an event or occurrence that leaves an impression 6
  8. 8. customer |kuhsˈ-tuh-mer| noun a person who purchases goods or services experience |ikˈspi(ə)rēəns| noun an event or occurrence that leaves an impression 6
  9. 9. customer |kuhsˈ-tuh-mer| noun a person who purchases goods or services experience |ikˈspi(ə)rēəns| noun an event or occurrence that leaves an impression 6
  10. 10. myth #1 You can design experiences. 7
  11. 11. m odel myth #1 ^ You can design experiences. 7
  12. 12. myth #2 Experience strategy should be focused on creating something new.  8
  13. 13. Actually, there is a lot of evidence to suggest nothing is independently “new”. The concept of multiple discovery is the hypothesis that most scientific discoveries and inventions are made independently and more or less simultaneously by multiple scientists and inventors. 9
  14. 14. Every innovation has precursors. iPad: 2010 10
  15. 15. Every innovation has precursors. Dynabook: 1968 iPad: 2010 10
  16. 16. Every innovation has precursors. Telautograph: 1888 Dynabook: 1968 iPad: 2010 10
  17. 17. Every innovation has precursors. Stone Tablets: BC Telautograph: 1888 Dynabook: 1968 iPad: 2010 10
  18. 18. Apple even “borrows” from itself. By Apple - click image for link to video By Apple - click image for link to video Two television adverts from different eras: • both start by asking ‘What is iPad or Newton?’ • both refer to already knowing how to use it • both state to how ‘powerful’ it is • both use the words ‘magic’ or ‘magical’ 11
  19. 19. As Kirby says, Everything is a Remix By Kirby Ferguson - click image for link to video By Kirby Ferguson - click image for link to video Innovations are not ideas but tipping points: • in a continuous line of invention by many people • dramatic results can happen when combined • by connecting ideas together, leaps can be made • examples: printing press, Model T, Internet • elements of creativity: copy, transform, combine 12
  20. 20. myth #2 Experience strategy should be focused on creating something new.  13
  21. 21. myth #2 Experience strategy should be focused on creating something new.  ^ iliar fam 13
  22. 22. myth #3 Experience strategy consistently produces significant value.  14
  23. 23. What can Experience Strategy learn from Service Design (and Brandon Schauer)? The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design by Brandon Schauer 15
  24. 24. What can Experience Strategy learn from Service Design (and Brandon Schauer)? value — Where service design misses EXISTING NEW CAPABILITIES CAPABILITIES EXISTING Optimization Service CUSTOMERS Development NEW Market Diversification CUSTOMERS Development — riff off of the Ansoff Matrix, circa 1957 The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design by Brandon Schauer 15
  25. 25. What can Experience Strategy learn from Service Design (and Brandon Schauer)? value — Why service design sucks at it Where service design misses EXISTING NEW CAPABILITIES CAPABILITIES EXISTING Optimization Service CUSTOMERS Development NEW Market Diversification CUSTOMERS Development — riff off of the Ansoff Matrix, circa 1957 The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design by Brandon Schauer 15
  26. 26. What can Experience Strategy learn from Service Design (and Brandon Schauer)? value — Why service design sucks at it Where service design misses EXISTING NEW CAPABILITIES CAPABILITIES EXISTING Optimization Service CUSTOMERS Development NEW Market Diversification CUSTOMERS Development — riff off of the Ansoff Matrix, circa 1957 The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design by Brandon Schauer 15
  27. 27. What can Experience Strategy learn from Service Design (and Brandon Schauer)? value — Why service design sucks at it playing Where service design should be misses EXISTING NEW CAPABILITIES CAPABILITIES EXISTING Market Optimization Service CUSTOMERS Optimization Development NEW Market Diversification CUSTOMERS Development — riff off of the Ansoff Matrix, circa 1957 The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design by Brandon Schauer 15
  28. 28. myth #3 Experience strategy consistently produces significant value.  16
  29. 29. myth #3 Experience strategy consistently produces significant value.  ^ on new need s to focus c ustomers or new ilities to p roduce capab 16
  30. 30. 3 Truths of Customer Experience truth #1 You can model experiences. truth #2 Experience strategy should be focused on creating something that is familiar.  truth #3 Experience strategy needs to focus on new customers or new capabilities to produce significant value.  17
  31. 31. Experience Strategy = Business Strategy + Experience Modeling 18
  32. 32. As Roger Martin, Dean of Rotman School of Management, says... Business Strategy is where to play, and how to win. 19
  33. 33. As Rick Robinson, former CXO of Sapient, says... XMOD is to create really interesting pictures of user experiences. 20
  34. 34. Experience Modeling XMOD enables us to see problems (heuristic) and opportunities (generative) clearly; also, it enables a cross-functional team to tackle a problem from a similar vantage point. 21
  35. 35. Key ‘Aspects of the Experience’ 22
  36. 36. Key ‘Aspects of the Experience’ PEOPLE CUSTOMER USER 22
  37. 37. Key ‘Aspects of the Experience’ PEOPLE CUSTOMER USER JOURNEY SCENARIO PROCESS 22
  38. 38. Key ‘Aspects of the Experience’ PEOPLE CUSTOMER USER JOURNEY SCENARIO PROCESS MODE STATE ROLE 22
  39. 39. Key ‘Aspects of the Experience’ PEOPLE CUSTOMER USER JOURNEY SCENARIO PROCESS MODE STATE ROLE VALUE MOTIVATION EMOTION 22
  40. 40. Key ‘Aspects of the Experience’ PEOPLE CUSTOMER USER JOURNEY SCENARIO PROCESS MODE STATE ROLE VALUE MOTIVATION EMOTION METAPHOR ANALOGY STORY 22
  41. 41. An Early Example Sneezy by eLab/SapientNitro 23
  42. 42. References: You Can’t Design Experiences http://www.informationarchitects.jp/en/can-experience-be-designed-2/ http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2011/03/15/why-user-experience-cannot-be-designed/ http://zenagile.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/user-experience-cant-be-designed/ http://blog.thisisservicedesignthinking.com/post/2422855935/free-download-all-icons-from-tisdt-are-available Nothing is New http://www.everythingisaremix.info/ http://www.freepatentsonline.com/386815.pdf http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505123_162-42744882/separated-at-birth-ads-for-ipad-and-failed-90s-pda-newton- draw-from-the-same-well/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2BvVcSkNkA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bh-yed48e0Y Creating Value through Experience Strategy & Service Design http://brandonschauer.com/post/11710895190/sdnc11 Experience Strategy & Modeling http://blogs.hbr.org/martin/2010/05/the-five-questions-of-strategy.html http://loop1.aiga.org/documents/edition003/sapientucd/03_sapientucdB.pdf http://www.fastcompany.com/articles/1999/11/elab.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boundary_object http://id.iit.edu http://www.sapientnitro.com 24
  43. 43. — how to create value for people through new or improved services and products. Innovation doesn’t require unusual genius or creativity, but lately all the buzz surrounding innovation has made it look awfully complicated. Naked Innovation helps unveil some of the mysteries of the process—stripping it down to reveal structures that multidisciplinary teams can share. Once you see the underlying uncovering a shared approach paradis / m c gaw theory and the methods which flow from for creating value it, you’ll become even more effective at doing it yourself. “A terrific contribution to the integration of design and management” roger martin, dean, rotman school of management, university of toronto Zachary Jean Paradis David McGaw Chicago, Illinois | www.id.iit.edu IIT Institute of Design 25
  44. 44. Thank you! zachary jean paradis zparadis@sapient.com sapient.com creativeslant.com nakedinnovation.com twitter.com/zacharyparadis 26

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • good day. i recently gave this presentation on three myths of customer experience at an event organized by the The UK Usability Professionals' Association. it followed two other excellent talks on UX + strategy by Tom Wood, Manager Partner at Foolproof user experience, and Leisa Reichelt, noted speaker and UX Consultant living in London.\n
  • it’s worth mentioning that i work at the experience innovation consulting firm, sapientnitro, and teach at the IIT Institute of Design from where i also received a masters. my world view is certainly influenced by both organizations. \n
  • without further adieu, let’s talk about three key myths of customer experience. \n
  • myth#1 - You can design experiences. this could be inflammatory given how many people i know that have titles that include “experience design” in them. in fact, SapientNitro uses this title across the globe so i’m probably going to have an earful from my colleagues by posting this.\n
  • the fact of the matter is that this isn’t a new argument but it is indeed an important one. there’s a range of thoughts online both for an against the “experience design” notion so let me explain why i believe it’s broken. \n
  • first, let’s look at the definitions of both customer and experience. (say both definitions) for an experience to happen, we need a customer or user but we can’t design a customer or user. As a result, we’ll typically be guessing to some level who will be engaging with the things we build. This is a big deal because people themselves bring so much to the table which distorts every interaction with a specific touch point. Of course we have culture and a person’s natural predilections or dislikes. There’s the societal group in which she or he belongs and everything that comes with it. Also, interactions with other people or specific touch points carry with it a whole load of context: who else is there, what specific touch point is being used, what else is around at the time? All of this together comes together to make an experience.\n
  • first, let’s look at the definitions of both customer and experience. (say both definitions) for an experience to happen, we need a customer or user but we can’t design a customer or user. As a result, we’ll typically be guessing to some level who will be engaging with the things we build. This is a big deal because people themselves bring so much to the table which distorts every interaction with a specific touch point. Of course we have culture and a person’s natural predilections or dislikes. There’s the societal group in which she or he belongs and everything that comes with it. Also, interactions with other people or specific touch points carry with it a whole load of context: who else is there, what specific touch point is being used, what else is around at the time? All of this together comes together to make an experience.\n
  • first, let’s look at the definitions of both customer and experience. (say both definitions) for an experience to happen, we need a customer or user but we can’t design a customer or user. As a result, we’ll typically be guessing to some level who will be engaging with the things we build. This is a big deal because people themselves bring so much to the table which distorts every interaction with a specific touch point. Of course we have culture and a person’s natural predilections or dislikes. There’s the societal group in which she or he belongs and everything that comes with it. Also, interactions with other people or specific touch points carry with it a whole load of context: who else is there, what specific touch point is being used, what else is around at the time? All of this together comes together to make an experience.\n
  • in the end, we can’t really “design” experiences but we can model them. modeling is a higher-level, more abstract type of activity which is no less valuable than design and, in fact, is more valuable to strategy. \n
  • myth #2: experience strategy should be focused on creating something new. \n
  • in fact, there is a lot of evidence to suggest nothing or very little is really ever “new”. The concept of multiple discovery opposes a traditional view—the "heroic theory" of invention and discovery–and suggests that in many or all cases, we see the same supposedly “new” idea actually is produced by several individuals around the globe all at the same time. given this is the case, the reality of newness is that inventions are the result of a collective wisdom and consciousness. in many ways, invention isn’t really “new” but is instead inevitable.\n
  • for example. let’s consider Apple’s iPad, launched in 2010. in just two years, it’s become clear the tablet platform is going to be dominant. obviously the ipad is tremendously innovative, but is it really “new”? as a matter of fact, there are many precursors to the ipad. consider just three of them. Alan Kay’s Dynabook was showcased in 1968 with a somewhat similar form factor, albeit featuring a keyboard. Kay noted he believed the device should retail for $500, interestingly the exact price of the first iPad. looking back quite a bit further, i did a search and found a patent from 1888 by Elisha Gray. his Telautograph suggested an electric tablet which sat on a table with an attached pen which could transmit drawn messages across great distances distances. finally, jokingly, we are familiar with other ancient tablets. in reality though, i’m only joking a bit because this form factor is so critical to artifacts we use every day like notepads. so Apple is using precursors everywhere whether they know it or not. interestingly, Apple looks for precursors not only from others but also from itself. \n
  • for example. let’s consider Apple’s iPad, launched in 2010. in just two years, it’s become clear the tablet platform is going to be dominant. obviously the ipad is tremendously innovative, but is it really “new”? as a matter of fact, there are many precursors to the ipad. consider just three of them. Alan Kay’s Dynabook was showcased in 1968 with a somewhat similar form factor, albeit featuring a keyboard. Kay noted he believed the device should retail for $500, interestingly the exact price of the first iPad. looking back quite a bit further, i did a search and found a patent from 1888 by Elisha Gray. his Telautograph suggested an electric tablet which sat on a table with an attached pen which could transmit drawn messages across great distances distances. finally, jokingly, we are familiar with other ancient tablets. in reality though, i’m only joking a bit because this form factor is so critical to artifacts we use every day like notepads. so Apple is using precursors everywhere whether they know it or not. interestingly, Apple looks for precursors not only from others but also from itself. \n
  • for example. let’s consider Apple’s iPad, launched in 2010. in just two years, it’s become clear the tablet platform is going to be dominant. obviously the ipad is tremendously innovative, but is it really “new”? as a matter of fact, there are many precursors to the ipad. consider just three of them. Alan Kay’s Dynabook was showcased in 1968 with a somewhat similar form factor, albeit featuring a keyboard. Kay noted he believed the device should retail for $500, interestingly the exact price of the first iPad. looking back quite a bit further, i did a search and found a patent from 1888 by Elisha Gray. his Telautograph suggested an electric tablet which sat on a table with an attached pen which could transmit drawn messages across great distances distances. finally, jokingly, we are familiar with other ancient tablets. in reality though, i’m only joking a bit because this form factor is so critical to artifacts we use every day like notepads. so Apple is using precursors everywhere whether they know it or not. interestingly, Apple looks for precursors not only from others but also from itself. \n
  • in two television spots released roughly a decade apart, Apple it seems has borrowed from itself. both ads start by asking “What is iPad or Newton?” both refer to already knowing how to use it. both use the words magic or magical. both talk about how powerful it is. it’s basically the same tv ad but a decade or more later. while we typically look for precursors in different industries, this is a case where we have a precursor which is from the same company. it’s worth clicking through and watching both ads. the similarities are remarkable. next, let’s discuss some concepts from Kirby Ferguson’s excellent Everything is a Remix series.\n
  • in part 3 of the series, Kirby talks about where big ideas come from... we learn that big innovations are not individual ideas but tipping points in a continuous line of invention by many people. it is in this notion of connecting ideas together when leaps can happen. what we should take away from it is not that we have to fundamentally create something from out of nowhere. in fact, what we want to do is copy, transform and combine precursors in a way which adds new value whilst at the same time is familiar. this great thinking is representative of the rest of Everything is a Remix. you should definitely take the time to watch Kirby’s whole series. \n
  • so experience strategy should really be focused on creating something familiar rather than something new. newness for newnesses sake results in edgy non-sense.\n
  • myth #3: experience strategy consistently produces significant value. given my business card says i’m an experience strategist, this is obviously important to me. unfortunately, much work in the space is often done with an obsessive focus is on customer “pain points” and problems rather than that which will create the most innovation and value. there is a set of practices, methods and tools which are all used in similar disciplines with different names. experience strategy, experience design and service design are more alike than they’re different. given this, it’s worth seeing what experience strategy can learn from service design and the excellent thinking of Adaptive Path’s president, Brandon Schauer. \n
  • in a talk titled The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design, Brandon walks us through where he believes service design is currently playing and where it should be. first off, we see Brandon’s riff on the classic Anisoff matrix. as we look at where the Service Design community is playing, well represented by the worthwhile book This is Service Design thinking... what we see is a discipline really focused on addressing existing customers and existing capabilities. service design and experience strategy is typically focused on optimization. where we have to go with it to really be strategic and create new value is in the development of new customers or new capabilities: fundamentally new markets or new services. this is why i’m only partially interested in typical customers but actually a lot more interested in extreme or potential ones. \n\nso if we focus developing new customers and new capabilities, our work can drive significant value. this is how UX and experience strategists can have a seat at the table: to understand their role in optimizing experiences but also in identifying business opportunities.\n
  • in a talk titled The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design, Brandon walks us through where he believes service design is currently playing and where it should be. first off, we see Brandon’s riff on the classic Anisoff matrix. as we look at where the Service Design community is playing, well represented by the worthwhile book This is Service Design thinking... what we see is a discipline really focused on addressing existing customers and existing capabilities. service design and experience strategy is typically focused on optimization. where we have to go with it to really be strategic and create new value is in the development of new customers or new capabilities: fundamentally new markets or new services. this is why i’m only partially interested in typical customers but actually a lot more interested in extreme or potential ones. \n\nso if we focus developing new customers and new capabilities, our work can drive significant value. this is how UX and experience strategists can have a seat at the table: to understand their role in optimizing experiences but also in identifying business opportunities.\n
  • in a talk titled The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design, Brandon walks us through where he believes service design is currently playing and where it should be. first off, we see Brandon’s riff on the classic Anisoff matrix. as we look at where the Service Design community is playing, well represented by the worthwhile book This is Service Design thinking... what we see is a discipline really focused on addressing existing customers and existing capabilities. service design and experience strategy is typically focused on optimization. where we have to go with it to really be strategic and create new value is in the development of new customers or new capabilities: fundamentally new markets or new services. this is why i’m only partially interested in typical customers but actually a lot more interested in extreme or potential ones. \n\nso if we focus developing new customers and new capabilities, our work can drive significant value. this is how UX and experience strategists can have a seat at the table: to understand their role in optimizing experiences but also in identifying business opportunities.\n
  • in a talk titled The Business Case For (Or Against) Service Design, Brandon walks us through where he believes service design is currently playing and where it should be. first off, we see Brandon’s riff on the classic Anisoff matrix. as we look at where the Service Design community is playing, well represented by the worthwhile book This is Service Design thinking... what we see is a discipline really focused on addressing existing customers and existing capabilities. service design and experience strategy is typically focused on optimization. where we have to go with it to really be strategic and create new value is in the development of new customers or new capabilities: fundamentally new markets or new services. this is why i’m only partially interested in typical customers but actually a lot more interested in extreme or potential ones. \n\nso if we focus developing new customers and new capabilities, our work can drive significant value. this is how UX and experience strategists can have a seat at the table: to understand their role in optimizing experiences but also in identifying business opportunities.\n
  • so, if experience strategy is to drive significant value, it’s going to have to focus on developing new customers, new capabilities, or both.\n
  • three key truths of customer experience are:\n\nyou can model experiences. experience strategy should be focused on creating something that is familiar. and, experience strategy needs to focus on new customers or new capabilities to produce significant value. given the series of talks at the UK UPA were all focused on strategy and customer experience, it’s worth noting my definition for experience strategy.\n
  • put simply, experience strategy = business strategy + experience modeling. it’s important to note that the definition is additive. like i suggested earlier, it’s not something which is completely “new”, although many guru’s in the field would like you to believe it is. experience strategy builds on the excellent thinking done by the fathers of business strategy and extends strategy to include modeling experiences. let’s dive a bit further in to each part of this definition.\n
  • Roger Martin, Dean of Rotman School of management is a great thinker in classic and contemporary strategy. in addition to leading one of the world’s best business schools, he also had a long, successful consulting career and was one of the original directors of Monitor Group, the company founded by probably the most famous strategist to ever write on the topic, Michael Porter. you’ve may have heard of Porter’s famed 5 forces framework. i’m in love with Roger’s definition of business strategy: “Where to play and how to win.” that we need to define an opportunity, to prioritize a customer set and outline how an organization will primarily differentiate really hasn’t changed which is why classic strategic frameworks are still valuable. perhaps what has changed though, is the way in which we use business frameworks and the level of detail required illustrating a potential experience. this is why experience modeling is so important. \n
  • Rick Robinson, founder of eLab then former chief experience officer at Sapient, defined experience modeling–or XMOD–very simply as creating really interesting pictures of user experience. interesting pictures and diagrams are ones which help us judge a current state, identify opportunities and ultimately come up with incremental or groundbreaking experience innovation. as an extension and compliment to classic business strategy, experience modeling offers a world of insight and innovation possibilities which would have been difficult to achieve without it.\n
  • more specifically, XMOD enables us to see problems (heuristic) and opportunities (generative) clearly; also, it enables a cross-functional team to tackle a problem from a similar vantage point. in this way experience models act as boundary objects tying a team’s work together. Experience innovation has been a focus of mine since before I even understood what it was. Having studied, practiced, written and taught about the complimentary disciplines of social sciences, management and design, I’ve come to believe there are a critical set of items which must be understood to really nail a future experience.\n
  • i call these the ‘Aspects of the Experience’. as experience strategists, we first need to understand what differentiates people, whether customers or users or stakeholders. we must also understand their journey, core scenarios and processes in which they will interact and engage with our organization and others in an ecosystem. while often confused with journey, understanding of mode, state or role is also important, especially in our increasingly multichannel context. critically, we must know what people value, their motivation and emotions. some focus on needs but, in the end, values and motivations encompass both needs and more aspirational opportunities. finally, given outlining all of these things can seem a bit daunting and complex, i find it critical to leverage a metaphor, analogy or story to help teams and clients stand in the future and see our opportunity–a literal or notional pre-cursor. it’s good for these to be as clear as possible. for example, we might say an experience is like a jet fighter cockpit. while i myself i have never been in a jet fighter, i already have a strong sense of what that means and how it might apply to some experience i’m working on. these can all come together in powerful, integrated models like value webs or experience maps. \n
  • i call these the ‘Aspects of the Experience’. as experience strategists, we first need to understand what differentiates people, whether customers or users or stakeholders. we must also understand their journey, core scenarios and processes in which they will interact and engage with our organization and others in an ecosystem. while often confused with journey, understanding of mode, state or role is also important, especially in our increasingly multichannel context. critically, we must know what people value, their motivation and emotions. some focus on needs but, in the end, values and motivations encompass both needs and more aspirational opportunities. finally, given outlining all of these things can seem a bit daunting and complex, i find it critical to leverage a metaphor, analogy or story to help teams and clients stand in the future and see our opportunity–a literal or notional pre-cursor. it’s good for these to be as clear as possible. for example, we might say an experience is like a jet fighter cockpit. while i myself i have never been in a jet fighter, i already have a strong sense of what that means and how it might apply to some experience i’m working on. these can all come together in powerful, integrated models like value webs or experience maps. \n
  • i call these the ‘Aspects of the Experience’. as experience strategists, we first need to understand what differentiates people, whether customers or users or stakeholders. we must also understand their journey, core scenarios and processes in which they will interact and engage with our organization and others in an ecosystem. while often confused with journey, understanding of mode, state or role is also important, especially in our increasingly multichannel context. critically, we must know what people value, their motivation and emotions. some focus on needs but, in the end, values and motivations encompass both needs and more aspirational opportunities. finally, given outlining all of these things can seem a bit daunting and complex, i find it critical to leverage a metaphor, analogy or story to help teams and clients stand in the future and see our opportunity–a literal or notional pre-cursor. it’s good for these to be as clear as possible. for example, we might say an experience is like a jet fighter cockpit. while i myself i have never been in a jet fighter, i already have a strong sense of what that means and how it might apply to some experience i’m working on. these can all come together in powerful, integrated models like value webs or experience maps. \n
  • i call these the ‘Aspects of the Experience’. as experience strategists, we first need to understand what differentiates people, whether customers or users or stakeholders. we must also understand their journey, core scenarios and processes in which they will interact and engage with our organization and others in an ecosystem. while often confused with journey, understanding of mode, state or role is also important, especially in our increasingly multichannel context. critically, we must know what people value, their motivation and emotions. some focus on needs but, in the end, values and motivations encompass both needs and more aspirational opportunities. finally, given outlining all of these things can seem a bit daunting and complex, i find it critical to leverage a metaphor, analogy or story to help teams and clients stand in the future and see our opportunity–a literal or notional pre-cursor. it’s good for these to be as clear as possible. for example, we might say an experience is like a jet fighter cockpit. while i myself i have never been in a jet fighter, i already have a strong sense of what that means and how it might apply to some experience i’m working on. these can all come together in powerful, integrated models like value webs or experience maps. \n
  • i call these the ‘Aspects of the Experience’. as experience strategists, we first need to understand what differentiates people, whether customers or users or stakeholders. we must also understand their journey, core scenarios and processes in which they will interact and engage with our organization and others in an ecosystem. while often confused with journey, understanding of mode, state or role is also important, especially in our increasingly multichannel context. critically, we must know what people value, their motivation and emotions. some focus on needs but, in the end, values and motivations encompass both needs and more aspirational opportunities. finally, given outlining all of these things can seem a bit daunting and complex, i find it critical to leverage a metaphor, analogy or story to help teams and clients stand in the future and see our opportunity–a literal or notional pre-cursor. it’s good for these to be as clear as possible. for example, we might say an experience is like a jet fighter cockpit. while i myself i have never been in a jet fighter, i already have a strong sense of what that means and how it might apply to some experience i’m working on. these can all come together in powerful, integrated models like value webs or experience maps. \n
  • many people believe this field: experience strategy, experience design or service design, is very new. service designers are particularly virulent in acting like they’ve just invented an entirely new field. the reality is that the majority of the process, methods and tools used by an experience strategist or service designer are a decade or more old. having been taught at the IIT Institute of design and then working at Sapient, now SapientNitro, i see the legacy of this discipline laid bare. take this simple yet powerful experience model created over 12 years ago, before the year 2000. in a project dubbed “sneezy”, eLab–an experience research and modeling company acquired by Sapient–helped an over-the-counter drug manufacturer understand and identify opportunities for the common cold. before this project, conventional wisdom suggested you just got sick. elabbers spent time with people who were sick. i’m sure quite a few of them got ill in the process. what they discovered was a journey which offered new opportunities, for good or bad, for over-the-counter drugs to help people with colds manage their symptoms. (talk about journey) again, for good or for bad, this really opened up what pharmaceutical companies could offer to people.\n
  • as with any thinking, i stand on the shoulders of giants. wherever possible, i’ve made direct references to the authors or originators of any ideas i’ve used. you would be well served to spend time with these links. all of these references can also be found as active hyperlinks at my website, creativeslant.com. in addition to more information about me, i blog on a nearly weekly basis. \n
  • if you’re interested in this type of thinking and specifically about innovation, you should also know about my book: Naked Innovation. the book outlines how to create value for people through new or improved services and products. it’s written specifically to help unveil some of the mysteries around innovation and is used in leading graduate schools of design and business as well as many Fortune 1000 companies. it can be purchased at NakedInnovation.com.\n
  • thank you for watching this presentation and i hope i’ll hear from you. you can contact me through professional or personal communications. cheers and have a great day.\n

×