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Virtual Reality

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Virtual reality
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Virtual Reality

  1. 1. Virtual Reality By. Viral V. Patel
  2. 2. TOPICES • Definition • Introduction • History • Type of virtual reality • Technology • Steps to Developing Virtual reality • Application • Merit • Demerit • Summary
  3. 3. Define : Virtual Reality (VR), sometimes referred to as ”immersive multimedia”, Is a computer simulated environment that can simulate physical presence in places in the non-physical world or imagined world. Virtual reality can recreate sensory experiences, which include virtual taste, sight, smell, sound, and touch.
  4. 4. Introduction  What is Virtual Reality(VR) ?  Virtual Reality refers to a high-end user interface that involves real-time simulation and interactions through multiple sensorial channels.  VR is able to immerse you in a computer- generated world of your own making a room, a city, the interior of human body. With VR, you can explore any uncharted territory of the human imagination.
  5. 5. History of VR • In mid 1950s visionary cinematographer Morton H Eilig built a single user console called Sensorama that included a stereoscopic display, fans, or emitters, stereo speakers and a moving chair. This enabled the user watch television in three dimensional ways.
  6. 6. Sensorama • 3d • Wide vision • Motion • Colour • Stereo sound • Aromas • Wind • vibration
  7. 7. History of VR • In 1961, Philco Corporation engineers developed the first HMD known as the Headsight. The helmet consisted of a video screen along with a tracking system. Then they linked to a closed circuit camera system.
  8. 8. History of VR • In 1965, a computer scientist named Ivan Sutherland envisioned what he called the “Ultimate Display.” After using this display a person imagines the virtual world very similar to the real world.
  9. 9. Types of VR 1. Window on World Systems (WoW) 2. Video Mapping 3. Immersive Systems 4. Telepresence 5. Mixed Reality
  10. 10. Window on World Systems (WoW) • Some systems use a conventional computer monitor to display the visual world. • called Desktop VR or a Window on a World (WoW).
  11. 11. Video Mapping • A variation of the WoW approach merges a video input of the user's silhouette with a 2D computer graphic. • The user watches a monitor that shows his body's interaction with the world.
  12. 12. Immersive Systems • The ultimate VR systems completely immerse the user's personal viewpoint inside the virtual world. • These "immersive" VR systems are often equipped with a Head Mounted Display (HMD)
  13. 13. Telepresence • Telepresence is a variation on visualizing complete computer generated worlds. • This a technology links remote sensors in the real world with the senses of a human operator.
  14. 14. Mixed Reality • Merging the Telepresence and Virtual Reality systems gives the Mixed Reality • or Seamless Simulation systems.
  15. 15. Technology(hardware) • Virtual Sphere • Locomotion platform • A allows users to be completely immersed into their interactive virtual experience • Allowing them to walk through the virtual environment.
  16. 16. Technology(hardware) • Head mounted display • A helmet or a face mask providing the visual and auditory displays. • Use LCD or CRT to display stereo images. • May include built-in head-tracker and stereo headphones
  17. 17. Technology(hardware) • Data Gloves • Outfitted with sensors on the fingers as well as an overall position/orientation tracking equipment. • Enables natural interaction with virtual objects by hand gesture recognition.
  18. 18. Technology(hardware) • (BOOM)Binocular Omni-Orientation Monitor. • It is a head-coupled stereoscopic display device. • Screens & optical system are housed in a box that is attached to a multi-link arm. • The user looks into the box, sees the virtual world, and can guide the box to any position.
  19. 19. Technology(hardware) • The CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment) • provides the illusion of immersion by projecting stereo images on the walls and floor of a room-sized cube. • A head tracking system continuously adjust the stereo projection to the current position of the leading viewer.
  20. 20. Technology(software) • VR Software exits in many forms and for many VR applications. These include:  Three Dimensional Modelling Software  Two-Dimensional Graphics Software  Digital Sound Editing Software  Simulation Software
  21. 21. Technology(software) • Three Dimensional Modelling Software • Since virtual reality is a three-dimensional medium, all the objects in a virtual world must be 3D. • The actual geometry of the objects must be specified using 3D modelling software, and then imported into the virtual environment. • Few examples of 3d software ▫ VRML- virtual reality modelling language ▫ X3D ▫ Java 3D ▫ AC3D ▫ Alice, etc
  22. 22. Technology(software) • Two-Dimensional Graphics Software • Since there is a limit to the geometric complexity of the objects in a virtual world, it is often useful to be able to "paint" the surfaces of the objects with additional detail. • This process is called texture mapping and requires two- dimensional graphics software often called "paint programs". • A few examples of 2D graphics software: ▫ Adobe Photoshop ▫ Adobe Illustrator ▫ Fractal Design Painter
  23. 23. • Digital Sound Editing Software • Sound is a very important, yet often neglected aspect of virtual reality. • A virtual environment is low resolution, looks like computer graphics, and is not likely to be mistaken for the real thing. • Digital sound is nearly as high resolution as human hearing. Digital editing software allows you to cut, splice, mix, and loop the sounds of your virtual environment.
  24. 24. Technology(software) • Simulation Software • Virtual Reality requires sophisticated software in order to provide a compelling experience. • Software must be able to process the inputs coming from trackers and input devices, and then update the displays each second. • The software creates and maintains an internal database of all the objects in the virtual world, continually monitors changes to the database, and distributes this information to all the computers participating in the virtual world. • Examples of VR Simulation Software: Sense-8 Division Superscape Cosmo VRML
  25. 25. Ten Steps to Developing Virtual Reality Applications Step 0: Plan for the future; Never underestimate how fast technology will change during your development process. Step 1: Understand the strengths and weakness of educational VR. Step 2: Identify the intended audience and the end users probable equipment. Step 3: Identify an application that is suitable for VR.
  26. 26. Ten Steps to Developing Virtual Reality Applications Step 4: Choose an appropriate development platform (computer hardware & software) Step 5: Consider carefully the trade-offs of simulation realism versus performance, and plan out the simulation carefully. Step 6: Start with a simple framework, and then gradually add details. Step 7: Provide for student evaluation early and often; Develop the simulation based upon user feedback.
  27. 27. Ten Steps to Developing Virtual Reality Applications Step 8: Prepare instructions suitable for students, faculty, and systems administrators. Step 9: Incorporate the simulation into the curriculum. Step 10:Share your results far and wide.
  28. 28. Where is virtual reality used • MILITARY Flight simulators. Ship simulators. Tank simulators.
  29. 29. Where is virtual reality used • HEALTHCARE Practice performing surgery. Perform surgery on a remote patient. Teach new skills in a safe, controlled environment
  30. 30. Where is virtual reality used • ENTERTAINMENT More vivid Move exciting More attractive
  31. 31. Where is virtual reality used • EDUCATION Better learning Better understanding Fun and education
  32. 32. MERIT • Using 3D and virtual reality environments as part of your training methodology allows your students or workforce to experience an entirely new side of training. • Theory and practical • Real-life situations • Save on cost • Complex situations made easy • A safe environment
  33. 33. DEMERIT • Costly • Problematic to use • Repair or maintain • Cause a lack of understanding of the effects of some actions when performed outside the virtual environment.
  34. 34. ABSTRACT  Visualization of complicated, large data is helpful for understanding and analysis.  VR offers us a new way to interact with computer.  VR enables us to experience the virtual world that is impossible in real world.  VR is changing our life, eventually VR will increasingly become a part of our life.
  35. 35. THANK YOU

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