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Publication Strategies in the Social and Cultural Sciences

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These slides are part of an online workshop on “Publication Strategies in the Social and Cultural Sciences” held on 13 and 14 July for the Viadrina University of Frankfurt/ Oder.
Publish or perish - Those who do not publish will not make a career. However, finding a suitable publication option has never been as time-consuming as it is today. The scientific publication market is growing and differentiating itself continuously: Open Access, for example, is a familiar way of publishing today, but it is itself differentiated into a number of variants - green, gold, bronze or platinum Open Access. How to keep an oversight? The workshop will give an orientation for the bazaar of scientific publishing and will cover topics such as publication processes, quality assurance, impact measurement and rankings, open access vs. closed access and legal aspects. The workshop enables participants to develop an individual publication strategy and to consciously take advantage of the options and offers of the increasingly differentiated publishing market.

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Publication Strategies in the Social and Cultural Sciences

  1. 1. 13.07.2020 Dr. Ulrich Herb scidecode.com Publication Strategies in the Social and Cultural Sciences Europa-Universität Viadrina Viadrina Center for Graduate Studies (VCGS)
  2. 2. Agenda: Day One • Publishing in the social sciences and cultural sciences • Quality control in publishing • Impact metrics and rankings Slide 2
  3. 3. Why to publish? Slide 3
  4. 4. Groups: Why to publish? Slide 4
  5. 5. Individual relevance Publish or Perish  A scientist's career depends on hers/his reputation.  A scientist's reputation is determined by hers/his scientific impact.  The scientific impact is primarily determined by hers/his publication pattern.  How much is published, on what topic, with whom and where? Slide 5
  6. 6. Organizational relevance University evaluation and performance-based allocation of resources influence • material and personnel resources for scientific institutions • choice of research priorities & topics Common criteria • number of graduations • volume of third-party funds raised • publication patterns Slide 6
  7. 7. Types of publications Slide 7
  8. 8. History: Scientific publishing Emergence of scientific journals in the 17th century Origin: Letter correspondence, almanacs and meeting records of scientific societies • 1665: Henry Oldenburg founds Philosophical Transactions and sends excerpts of submitted documents • 1765: the Royal Society takes over the Philosophical Transactions and introduces a formalized review • Publication density of the early journals (intervals between issues) depends on the rhythm of the post coach traffic s. Fröhlich (2009) Slide 8
  9. 9. Groups: Types of publications Slide 9
  10. 10. Types of publications • Monographs • Journal article • Conference proceedings • Contributions in conference proceedings • Anthologies • Contributions in anthologies • Commemorative publications • Contributions to commemorative publications • Grey literature • Encyclopedia articles • Reviews • Interviews Slide 10
  11. 11. Publishing in the social and cultural sciences Slide 11
  12. 12. Common publication types Slide 12
  13. 13. Frequently read publication types Slide 13
  14. 14. Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities "With the growing number of publications, standardized selection procedures are gaining importance. The quality of a text per se is then less important than the seal of quality recognized by the scientific community in the form of the reputation or impact of the journal or publisher, and in the form of review procedures as a pre-selection for the recipients. The latter can no longer deviate from the preselections because they have become a social fact. (Münch 2009, p. 70 f.) Slide 14
  15. 15. Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities Slide 15 Political science, survey among members of the DVPW (Deutsche Vereinigung für politische Wissenschaften) (Faas & Schmitt-Beck, 2009) Type Share Contribution to an anthology 7.6 Journal article (peer reviewed) 4.6 Journal article (non peer reviewed) 5.8 Monographs 2.8 Anthologies 3.3 Others 6
  16. 16. Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities Plümper & Schimmelfennig, 2007 The higher the publication output, the more likely and faster scientists are to be considered for a professorship. Faas & Schmitt-Beck, 2009 • Measurement of academic performance in political science is usually done by the Social Science Citation Index • Peer-reviewed journal articles and monographs enjoy the highest reputation among political scientists Plümper, 2003 Trend: Increase in the number of journal articles and their importance Slide 16
  17. 17. Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities Engels et al., 2012 • Publication output grows faster in the Social Sciences than in the humanities. • A steady increase in the number and the proportion of publications in English is observed. • No overall shift away from book publishing is observed. • In the humanities, the share of book publications even seems to be increasing. Slide 17
  18. 18. Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities Sivertsen, 2016 “… publications in journals and series represent a little more than half of the publications in the humanities and two-thirds of the publications in the social sciences (…) . There are, however, just as wide differences within each of the two major areas: Only 45 % of the publications in History are in journals, compared to 61 % in Linguistics. In Sociology, only 46 % of the publications are in journals, compared to 75 % in Economics.” Sivertsen, 2019 Slide 18
  19. 19. Publishing in the Social Sciences and Humanities Sum up • Publication output grows faster in STM than in the Social Sciences and even more faster than in the humanities. • A steady increase in the number and the proportion of publications in English is observed. • No overall shift away from book publishing is observed (especially in the Humanities). • In the Social Sciences an increase in the number of journal articles can be observed. • In the Humanities, the share of book publications even seems to be increasing. • Peer review appears to be an important quality criterion. Slide 19
  20. 20. Quality control in publishing Slide 20
  21. 21. Quality control for scientific documents is usually carried out through peer review: Editorial Review  mainly journal articles, contributions to anthologies Review by Program Committee  mainly conference proceedings, contributions to conference proceedings Peer Review  mainly journal articles, contributions to anthologies, contributions to conference proceedings Slide 21
  22. 22. Peer Review: Group phase Slide 22
  23. 23. Peer Review and its variants Peer Review = review of submissions by experts (peers) appointed by the editor(s) of the journal (conference proceedings, anthology) Depending on the result of the review, the text is rejected, the author(s) is/are asked to revise it or the text is accepted for publication (possibly after prior revision). Timescales vary greatly depending on the discipline. Slide 23
  24. 24. Peer Review and its variants Variants  single blind submitting authors do not know the reviewers  double blind submitting authors and reviewers are unknown to each other  triple blind submitting authors and reviewers are unknown to one another, additionally the authors are unknown to the editors Slide 24
  25. 25. Peer Review Critique: Empirical findings Peer Review favors • articles by prestigious authors, • articles by authors from prestigious institutions, • articles that do not challenge common concepts. discriminates • submissions from competing colleagues/ theories/ institutions Reviewers sometimes even reject submissions, just to submit them later for publication oneself Fröhlich (2003, 2006); Ross (2006) Slide 25
  26. 26. Peer Review Critique: Empirical Findings Submissions by prestigious scientists, which have already been published in journals and are resubmitted as works by unknown authors and with slightly changed titles, are usually not recognized as resubmissions, but are rejected or accepted. When submitting fictional manuscripts, reviewers often fail to notice errors. Fröhlich (2003, 2006); Ross (2006) Slide 26
  27. 27. Peer Review Critique: Empirical Findings Peer review is influenced by …  Network effects  Gender bias (male reviewers prefer male submissions)  Language bias in favor of native English speakers  Age bias: Younger experts judge more rigidly than older ones. Fröhlich (2003, 2006); Ross (2006) Slide 27
  28. 28. Alternatives to classical peer review? Slide 28
  29. 29. Peer Review Alternatives: Group phase Slide 29
  30. 30. Open Review, a success: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Pöschl (2004), editor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics ACP An effective classical peer review is • in times of the "least publishing unit" strategy • rapidly increasing publication volumes and • shortened time spans for peer review hardly possible. Slide 30
  31. 31. Open Review, a success: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Open Review at Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics • Submissions are available Open Access • Reviews are also available Open Access • Reviews can be anonymous or non-anonymous • Final articles are published Open Access and linked to submissions and reviews Slide 31
  32. 32. Open Review, a success: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Advantages of the method (Pöschl 2004, 2006a, 2006b) • peer review comments become part of the scientific discourse • Open Access to reviews ensures efficiency of the review/ avoids duplication of work • transparency of publication prevents the submission of inferior papers/ results in higher efficiency • protection against plagiarism: citable publication of the submission documents priority claim • ensures fast feedback from the community Slide 32
  33. 33. Quality measurement of scientific publications Slide 33
  34. 34. Quality measurement Citation based impact: Journal Impact Factor & h-Index Slide 34
  35. 35. Bibliometrics Quality and reputation are usually assessed through impact. Impact is determined via citations a) to journals in which scientists publish, e.g. Journal Impact Factor (JIF) b) to publications of a scientist e.g. Hirsch Index (h-Index), publication frequency, normalized number of publications, number of citations, average number of citations per paper ... Slide 35
  36. 36. Journal Impact Factor Formula: JIF for journal X for the year Y Number of times citeable and non-citeable items published in journal X in the two preceding years before year Y were cited by indexed journals during year Y --------------------------------------------------- Number of citeable published in the journal X in the two preceding years before year Y Database: Journal Citation Reports, http://apps.isiknowledge.com/ Slide 36
  37. 37. Journal Impact Factor Formula: JIF 2019 Number of times citeable and non-citeable items published in journal X in 2017 and 2018 were cited by indexed journals during 2019 --------------------------------------------------- Number of times citeable items published in the journal X in the 2017 and 2018 Database: Journal Citation Reports, https://jcr.clarivate.com/ Slide 37
  38. 38. Journal Impact Factor Criticism: (Campbell 2005, 2008; Dong, Loh, & Mondry 2005; Fröhlich 1999; Seglen 1997, 1998)  Limited scope / exclusion of entire document types: grey literature, books, most web publications.  Only journals indexed in the Journal Citation Report JCR are covered.  Language bias in favor of English language journals: Journals in other languages have a lower JIF.  JIF refers to journals, not articles: Usually a small number of very frequently cited articles leads to a high value for the journal Slide 38
  39. 39. Journal Impact Factor Criticism: (Campbell 2005, 2008; Dong, Loh, & Mondry 2005; Fröhlich 1999; Seglen 1997, 1998)  Ignorance of citation cycles in different disciplines: Discrimination of journals from disciplines with cycles > 2 years (e.g. mathematics, humanities)  Manipulable  Confundation of popularity and quality Slide 39
  40. 40. Hirsch-Index Calculation: An author has an index h if h of his total N publications have at least h citations each and the other (N-h) publications have less than h citations. Slide 40 http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-Index
  41. 41. Hirsch-Index Calculation: An author has an index h if h of his total N publications have at least h citations each and the other (N-h) publications have less than h citations. Slide 41 http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-Index An author has an h-index of 8 if he has published 8 papers that have been cited at least 8 times each.
  42. 42. Hirsch-Index Comparison h-index/JIF: Slide 42 Number of Citations per Publication Publications Author A Author B Author C Author D 1 4 50 800 1.000 2 4 50 1 1.000 3 4 49 1 975 4 4 38 1 3 5 1 4 1 3 6 0 4 1 3 7 0 4 1 3 8 0 4 0 3 9 0 4 0 3 10 0 4 0 3 Hirsch-Index ? ? ? ?
  43. 43. Hirsch-Index Comparison h-index/JIF: Slide 43 Number of Citations per Publication Publications Author A Author B Author C Author D 1 4 50 800 1.000 2 4 50 1 1.000 3 4 49 1 975 4 4 38 1 3 5 1 4 1 3 6 0 4 1 3 7 0 4 1 3 8 0 4 0 3 9 0 4 0 3 10 0 4 0 3 Hirsch-Index 4 ? ? ?
  44. 44. Hirsch-Index Comparison h-index/JIF: Slide 44 Number of Citations per Publication Publications Author A Author B Author C Author D 1 4 50 800 1.000 2 4 50 1 1.000 3 4 49 1 975 4 4 38 1 3 5 1 4 1 3 6 0 4 1 3 7 0 4 1 3 8 0 4 0 3 9 0 4 0 3 10 0 4 0 3 Hirsch-Index 4 4 ? ?
  45. 45. Hirsch-Index Comparison h-index/JIF: Slide 45 Number of Citations per Publication Publications Author A Author B Author C Author D 1 4 50 800 1.000 2 4 50 1 1.000 3 4 49 1 975 4 4 38 1 3 5 1 4 1 3 6 0 4 1 3 7 0 4 1 3 8 0 4 0 3 9 0 4 0 3 10 0 4 0 3 Hirsch-Index 4 4 1 ?
  46. 46. Hirsch-Index Comparison h-index/JIF: Slide 46 Number of Citations per Publication Publications Author A Author B Author C Author D 1 4 50 800 1.000 2 4 50 1 1.000 3 4 49 1 975 4 4 38 1 3 5 1 4 1 3 6 0 4 1 3 7 0 4 1 3 8 0 4 0 3 9 0 4 0 3 10 0 4 0 3 Hirsch-Index 4 4 1 3
  47. 47. Hirsch-Index Comparison h-index/JIF: • Hirsch (h-) Index refers to authors and not to journals • Data basis not clearly defined Web Of Science, https://www.webofknowledge.com Scopus, http://ww.scopus.com Google Scholar, http://scholar.google.com … Features Advantage: Citation of a single, much-cited publication does not have any effect. Disadvantage: innovative approaches are not considered. Slide 47
  48. 48. Hirsch-Index Web Of Science, https://www.webofknowledge.com Scopus, http://ww.scopus.com Google Scholar, http://scholar.google.com … Features Advantage: Citation of a single, much-cited publication does not have any effect. Disadvantage: innovative approaches are not considered. Slide 48
  49. 49. Ratings & Rankings Slide 49
  50. 50. Rating & Rankings: Group phase Slide 50
  51. 51. Ratings & Ranking Multidisciplinary Anne Harzing‘s Journal Quality List https://harzing.com/resources/journal-quality-list Journal Impact Factor JIF https://jcr.clarivate.com/ Scimago Journal Rank https://www.scimagojr.com/ GoogleScholar https://scholar.google.de/citations?view_op=top_venues&hl=de Please keep in mind: Most impact databases rely on automatic procedures and need DOIs to identify publications and citations! Slide 51
  52. 52. Social Sciences GESIS List (Mostly German): https://www.gesis.org/fileadmin/upload/dienstleistung/fachinformationen/db_infosysteme/ Zeitschriften.pdf ISA Journal List https://www.isa-sociology.org/en/opportunities/publication-opportunities/list-of-the- selected-journals Jerry A. Jacobs: Journal Rankings in Sociology (2016) https://sociology.sas.upenn.edu/sites/default/files/Journal%20Rankings%20in%20Sociolo gy%20november%202015.pdf Ratings & Ranking Slide 52
  53. 53. Humanities/ Cultural Sciences European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH): https://dbh.nsd.uib.no/publiseringskanaler/erihplus/ Humanities Journals Wiki https://humanitiesjournals.fandom.com/wiki/Comparative_Literature,_Cultural_Studies_an d_Theory_Journals Journal Ranking of the NYU Shanghai https://shanghai.nyu.edu/sites/default/files/media/Journal%20Ranking_Cultural%20Studie s.pdf MLA Directory of Periodicals https://apps.mla.org/cgi-shl/docstudio/docs.pl?login&msg=requirelogin&xurl=dop Ratings & Ranking Slide 53
  54. 54. Blogs … Slide 54
  55. 55. Blogs allowing guest postings Open Edition https://www.openedition.org/ Hypothesis.org https://hypotheses.org/ LSE Impact Blog https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/ Slide 55
  56. 56. Take home messages so far … Slide 56
  57. 57. Take home messages  Increasing importance of journal articles and English language without parallel loss of importance of other publication types in other languages (especially in the Humanities)  Despite all the dysfunctionalities of peer review, peer reviewed publications gain higher reputation  Citations are indicators/ key metrics for relevance and supposed quality  You benefit not only from the citations of your texts, but also from the reputation of the publishers and journals in which you publish - rely on rankings and ratings.  If in doubt, publish in journals / with publishers who assign DOIs to publications, since citations to publications are usually identified via DOIs.  To link citations on your articles to your person, use ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID). An important tool for disambiguating people, especially when names can change or have different spellings. Slide 57
  58. 58. Legal aspects Slide 58
  59. 59. Urheberrecht vs. Copyright Slide 59 Urheberrecht, Droit d‘Auteur Anglo-American Copyright protection of author rights re-use and (commercial) exploitation • impossible to waive the Urheberrecht (= necessity to be referred to as the author) • authors can only grant rights of use (= copyright) • right passes to the author's heirs (or the heirs of the copyright holder) upon his death • Complete waiver of copyright is possible (public domain); can be completely transferred by the author and be retransmitted to third parties • right passes to the author's heirs (or the heirs of the copyright holder) upon his death Protection period Germany & France: 70 years after death of the author Protection period USA: 70/95 years after the author's death UK: 70 years after the author's death Practiced among others in: Germany, France, Switzerland, Austria, Netherlands, partly EU law Practiced in: USA, UK, Commonwealth
  60. 60. Urheberrecht vs. Copyright Slide 60 Urheberrecht, Droit d‘Auteur Anglo-American Copyright protection of author rights re-use and (commercial) exploitation • impossible to waive the Urheberrecht (= necessity to be referred to as the author) • authors can only grant rights of use (= copyright) • right passes to the author's heirs (or the heirs of the copyright holder) upon his death • Complete waiver of copyright is possible (public domain); can be completely transferred by the author and be retransmitted to third parties • right passes to the author's heirs (or the heirs of the copyright holder) upon his death Protection period Germany & France: 70 years after death of the author Protection period USA: 70/95 years after the author's death UK: 70 years after the author's death Practiced among others in: Germany, France, Switzerland, Austria, Netherlands, partly EU law Practiced in: USA, UK, Commonwealth
  61. 61. Copyright Authors may transfer a non-exclusive copyright to a publisher. This entitles the holder (publisher) to use the work in the defined/ permitted manner. The holder of an exclusive copyright is allowed to use and exploit the authors work exclusively. The holder of an exclusive copyright, in contrast to a non-exclusive copyright, is entitled to prohibit other persons from using the work in any manner. Slide 61
  62. 62. Open Access Slide 62
  63. 63. Open Access Open Access = Access to scientific information free of charge and as unhindered as possible First public record: 2001, Budapest Open Access Initiative Slide 63
  64. 64. The counterpart: Closed Access Reader's perspective: Access to scientific information against charge Subscription of the university’s library or Pay-Per-View Author‘s perspective:  Transfer of the exclusive rights of use (exclusive copyrights) to the publisher Business Model:  Subscription (Libraries are buying / licensing content for their users)  Author fees In the study “Publikationstrategien im Wandel?" (2005) commissioned by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) 38.5 % of the scientists stated to have paid fees for publications in Closed Access journals, in the field of Life sciences 75.3%, in the fields of humanities and social sciences 8.8%. Slide 64
  65. 65. Why Open Access?  electronic publications allow acceleration of the exchange of scientific information  technically facilitated dissemination and availability, BUT: drastic shortage in access to scientific information  reason: decreasing budgets of scientific institutions with rapidly increasing costs for the use of scientific information Slide 65
  66. 66. Open Access: Variants 1 Self-Archiving (Green Road): Publication of published scientific documents or preliminary versions thereof on digital repositories e.g. the Open Access server of the Viadrina University, https://opus4.kobv.de/opus4-euv/home 2 Self-Publishing (Golden Road): Founding or editing scientific online journals accessible free of charge or publishing in such journals • Financing sometimes based on Article Processing Charges APC • Publication fees are often covered by funders • Some universities provide publication funds Slide 66
  67. 67. Open Access: Variants 3 Platinum Open Access: • Gold Open Access without Article Processing Charges • Neither readers nor authors must pay for a platinum Open Access article 4 Bronze Open Access: • Closed Access journals remove the paywalls to their articles at the end of a defined time span and make them available Open Access 5 Hybrid Open Access: • against payment of a fee single articles are published Open Access in a Closed Access journal Slide 67
  68. 68. Green Open Access in spite of Closed Access agreements • by striking-out / deleting the passage transferring exclusive copyrights to publishers • by using a contractual addendum stating, for example, that the transfer of exclusive copyrights is limited in time SPARC Author's Addendum Copyright Addendum Engine • by amending the contract Slide 68
  69. 69. Green Open Access in spite of Closed Access agreements "I hereby declare that I do not wish to transfer full copyright to (name of the publisher) but reserve the right to self-archive the article in full in an open access repository.” https://www.open-access.net/informationen-zu-open- access/rechtsfragen/verlagsvertraege/#c1458 Slide 69
  70. 70. Green Open Access in spite of Closed Access agreements • copyrights to publishers • by using a contractual addendum stating, for example, that the transfer of exclusive copyrights is limited in time SPARC Author's Addendum Copyright Addendum Engine • by amending the contract • by using the Open Access Policy of the publisher http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Slide 70
  71. 71. Green Open Access in spite of Closed Access agreements: Group phase Slide 71
  72. 72. Closed Access Reader's perspective: Access to scientific information against charge Subscription of the university’s library or Pay-Per-View Author‘s perspective:  Transfer of the exclusive rights of use to the publisher Business Model:  Subscription  Author fees In the study “Publikationstrategien im Wandel?" (2005) commissioned by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) 38.5 % of the scientists stated to have paid fees for publications in Closed Access journals, in the field of Life sciences 75.3%, in the fields of humanities and social sciences 8.8%. Slide 72
  73. 73. Open Access Reader's perspective:  Access to scientific information free of charge  Libre Open Access (by using CC licenses): Other forms of utilisation (derivative works, commercial exploitation, etc.) Author‘s perspective:  usually transfer of a non-exclusive copyright to the publisher or platform operator  Libre Open Access: Fine-grained rights granting of further rights than the simple use for reading (e.g. with CC licenses) Business model:  APCs, institutional memberships, sponsoring Slide 73
  74. 74. Open Access Citation Advantage Slide 74
  75. 75. Open Access Citation Advantage Piwowar et al. (2018) „Open [Access] articles receive 18% more citations than otherwise expected.” Slide 75
  76. 76. Open Access Citation Advantage Norris (2008) Slide 76
  77. 77. Open Access to Research Data Slide 77
  78. 78. Open Access to Research Data: Group phase Slide 78
  79. 79. Open Access to Research Data Why? • Reproducibility • Synergies • Quality control • Secondary analyses • Comparative studies • Journal Policies • Funder Policies (http://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/) Slide 79
  80. 80. Open Access to Research Data Incentives? Articles whose associated data are available in open access are cited more frequently than other articles. Piwowar, H. A., Day, R. S., & Fridsma, D. B. (2007). Sharing detailed research data is associated with increased citation rate. PloS one, 2(3), e308. Public Library of Science. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0000308. Handling of data in the same way as text publications to make Data Curation attractive: Data becomes citable https://clarivate.com/webofsciencegroup/solutions/webofscience-data-citation-index/ Slide 80
  81. 81. Open Access & Funder Policies Slide 81
  82. 82. Open Access & Funder Policies An increasing number of research funders are making Open Access to texts (and in some cases also to data) compulsory for funded research(ers), e.g. … • Plan S = “an initiative for open-access science publishing launched in 2018 by ‘cOAlition S’", a consortium of national research agencies and funders from twelve European countries. The plan requires scientists and researchers who benefit from state-funded research organisations and institutions to publish their work in open repositories or in journals that are available to all by 2021.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plan_S • Funding by European Commission programmes requires that data and texts are published Open Access. Find relevant funder policies at http://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/ Slide 82
  83. 83. Open Access Services Slide 83
  84. 84. Open Access Publishing Open Access server of the Viadrina University  https://opus4.kobv.de/opus4-euv/home Open Access Repositories  http://www.opendoar.org  http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Disciplinary_repositories Zendo (multidisciplinary repository for text, data, software, …)  http://www.zenodo.org Directory of Open Access Journals/ DOAJ  http://www.doaj.org Publisher of Open Access Books  http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Publishers_of_OA_books  http://blog.bibliothek.kit.edu/ag_univerlage/ Registry of Research Data Repositories/ re3data  http://www.re3data.org/ Slide 84
  85. 85. Open Access Publishing: Social Sciences & Humanities Repositories RePEc (Research Papers in Economics): Catalogue with fulltext links, > 50% Open Access content SSRN (Social Science Research Network) Humanities Commons Data Archives Gesis Daten-Archiv & datorium: Data Repositories of the GESIS Slide 85
  86. 86. Finding Open Access Bielefeld Academic Search Engine  http://www.base-search.net/ GoogleScholar  http://scholar.google.de/ Journal Ranking: https://scholar.google.de/citations?view_op=top_venues&hl=de Plugin Unpaywall (Firefox and Chrome) automatically notifies users who come across a scientific publication to which their institution does not have access of available Open Access versions. Slide 86
  87. 87. Open Access at Viadrina Hybrid Open Access: Publication in Springer Nature & Wiley subscription journals without incurring costs. Gold Open Access: Publication in Springer Nature & Wiley Gold Open Access journals with 20% discount on the Author's fees (APCs) See: https://www.ub.europa-uni.de/de/benutzung/bestand/edocs/deal/verlage/index.html Slide 87
  88. 88. Choosing your publication venue Slide 88
  89. 89. Publication venues : Group phase Slide 89
  90. 90. Choosing the publication venue Monographs  Publication mode: Online/ Print/ Hybrid  Accessibility: Open Access or Closed Access  Distribution: Are the books available in libraries? → Karlsruhe Virtual Catalogue, World Cat  Perceived quality  Quality control  Costs (printing cost subsidy)  Retail price (has influence on distribution & sales)  Service (editing, proofreading, professional typesetting)  Own examination: Perceived quality of the publications  Publication speed  Advertising, distribution of review copies  Quantitative output of the publishers  Coherence of the publishing programme  Reputation important, especially for planned scientific activities/ careers  Assignment of a Digital Object Identifier  Royalities Slide 90
  91. 91. Choosing the publication venue Journal article  Publication mode: Online/ Print/ Hybrid  Accessibility: Open Acess or Closed Access  Distribution: Are the journals available in libraries? Journal database  Perceived quality  Quality control  Costs (Article Fees/Author Charges)  Rankings, JIF  Indexing in citation databases / evaluation by Altmetrics  Ratings  Reputation within the community  Assignment of a Digital Object Identifier Slide 91
  92. 92. Choosing the publication venue Check on dissemination Monographs: KVK (Karlsruher Virtueller Katalog, Karlsruhe Virtual Catalogue) https://kvk.bibliothek.kit.edu Journals: Zeitschriftendatenbank/ Journal database http://www.zeitschriftendatenbank.de/ Monographs & Journals Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) - Worldcat https://www.worldcat.org/ Slide 92
  93. 93. Thank you very much for your attention. Dr. Ulrich Herb u.herb@scidcode.com http://www.scidecode.com
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