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What Makes SharePoint UX Good?

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A SharePoint User eXperience
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What Makes SharePoint UX Good?

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What Makes SharePoint UX Good?What is UX?
What defines good UX?
Evaluation Criteria for SharePoint UX
Key Tips from the Field
The Future of SharePoint & Office 365 UXUX is the short for User Experience
UX is the experience that the user has while interacting with your X
It’s more about how the user feels when they use your X
Many different parts compose the UX, no “one things” makes it
UX is NOT the interface or design of your X
UI is short for User Interface
It’s what you see in the browser
Help messages, buttons, modals, characters, style, menus, navigation, pages
UI is an incredibly important part of UX

What Makes SharePoint UX Good?What is UX?
What defines good UX?
Evaluation Criteria for SharePoint UX
Key Tips from the Field
The Future of SharePoint & Office 365 UXUX is the short for User Experience
UX is the experience that the user has while interacting with your X
It’s more about how the user feels when they use your X
Many different parts compose the UX, no “one things” makes it
UX is NOT the interface or design of your X
UI is short for User Interface
It’s what you see in the browser
Help messages, buttons, modals, characters, style, menus, navigation, pages
UI is an incredibly important part of UX

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What Makes SharePoint UX Good?

  1. 1. What makes SharePoint UX good? Presented by Thomas Daly
  2. 2. About Me • Senior SharePoint Consultant Extraordinaire • B&R Business Solutions • Branding & Developer • Focused on the UI side of things • Community Involvement • Speaker • NJ SharePoint User Group Organizer • SharePoint Saturday NYC Organizer • SharePoint Saturday NJ Organizer • My SharePoint Blog
  3. 3. Overview • What is UX? • What defines good UX? • Evaluation Criteria for SharePoint UX • Key Tips from the Field • The Future of SharePoint & Office 365 UX
  4. 4. What is UX? • UX is the short for User Experience • UX is the experience that the user has while interacting with your X • It’s more about how the user feels when they use your X • Many different parts compose the UX, no “one things” makes it • UX is NOT the interface or design of your X
  5. 5. UI is not UX and UX is not UI
  6. 6. So then what is UI? • UI is short for User Interface • It’s what you see in the browser • Help messages, buttons, modals, characters, style, menus, navigation, pages • UI is an incredibly important part of UX
  7. 7. What makes for a good UX?
  8. 8. The User Experience Honeycomb • Useful. As practitioners, we can’t be content to paint within the lines drawn by managers. We must have the courage and creativity to ask whether our products and systems are useful, and to apply our knowledge of craft + medium to define innovative solutions that are more useful. • Usable. Ease of use remains vital, and yet the interface-centered methods and perspectives of human-computer interaction do not address all dimensions of web design. In short, usability is necessary but not sufficient. • Desirable. Our quest for efficiency must be tempered by an appreciation for the power and value of image, identity, brand, and other elements of emotional design. • Findable. We must strive to design navigable web sites and locatable objects, so users can find what they need. • Accessible. Just as our buildings have elevators and ramps, our web sites should be accessible to people with disabilities (more than 10% of the population). Today, it’s good business and the ethical thing to do. Eventually, it will become the law. • Credible. Thanks to the Web Credibility Project, we’re beginning to understand the design elements that influence whether users trust and believe what we tell them. • Valuable. Our sites must deliver value to our sponsors. For non-profits, the user experience must advance the mission. With for-profits, it must contribute to the bottom line and improve customer satisfaction. PETER MORVILLE http://semanticstudios.com/user_experience_design/
  9. 9. How can we evaluate SharePoint / O365 UX? As a Platform • Enterprise platform in which you can build upon • Performs seemingly endless functions • A Content Management System on steroids • At the mercy of Microsoft • The ability to change whatever you don’t like or expand upon it. As your Implementation • “Your Corporate Intranet” • What your organization decides to implement to enhance user productivity • Providing consistent information to the workforce • Increasing productivity through building components, tools, forms, workflows, lists, and libraries We can evaluate SP/O365 in two ways: as a platform & as your implementation
  10. 10. Valuable • The core of the honey comb – people wouldn’t use it, if there was no value behind it. • SharePoint get’s most of it’s UX points from this category • SharePoint has survived in an industry where things go cold as quickly as they become hot. This longevity is due to the fact that organizations are receiving value from this product. • SharePoint highest value comes from function as a content management and information delivery system • SharePoint ability to be customize and integrate with other systems
  11. 11. Usable • Are your pages laid out clearly and consistently throughout the site? • Can the user’s get around with in the site and achieve the goals they need to meet? • Are the web parts and components functioning as expected? • Do you have the correct permissions? • Are all connected services up and running consistently? • Are you error checking and gracefully handling custom coding errors?
  12. 12. Credible • SharePoint & O365 have built in credibility passed along from your organization. • If your organization is credible, then the perceived credibility of your Intranet will start around the same level. • You can only lose credibility by not having information update to date, by posting information late, or having gaps in content • Credibility will increase when users believe that they can go to the intranet and see up-to-date information / content • Having content authors - owning, maintaining lists/libraries, links
  13. 13. Useful • Are you building and implementing the right pieces that provide a direct benefit to the user? • Are you leveraging enough of the core features that the product has to offer [Search, Reporting, User Profiles, Social, Yammer?, Workflows, Skype?, OneDrive?] • Are you streamlining business processes to increase productivity? • Are you collecting and monitoring user activity?
  14. 14. Findable • Are employees able to get what they need in a timely and efficient manner? • How well is your navigation structured? Did you spend the upfront time in planning your information architecture? • Are you tagging documents & using consistent metadata across your site? • Are you defining content types? • Are you using enterprise search? And is it configured and working properly? • Make use of managed properties, search synonyms, and search web parts.
  15. 15. Desirable • Does your site invoke any feeling within the user to want to return? • Have you overhauled the out of the box interface in a positive way? • Are you creating apps/web parts within in the recommended patterns and practices laid out by Microsoft? • Are you maintain a consistent look and feel or is each component different?
  16. 16. Accessible • Can users access your intranet from their work location? • Are you supporting all of the latest modern browsers or a subset? • Are you supporting a variety of devices other than desktop/laptop? Tablets? Phones? BYOD? • Can users from remote networks accessible the intranet? • How many hoops does the user have to jump through to make a connection? • Can users with visual, hearing, speech, dexterity, and other cognitive needs utilize your intranet?
  17. 17. How does your SharePoint measure up?
  18. 18. Tips from the battle field for developing a better UX
  19. 19. Focus on Purpose • Too much thought is spent on UI and making things look prettier • Make sure to spend enough time on the why (do we need this) and how (will it work) • The majority of users care about things that work than flashiness • Reel in your designers – they don’t think about how things work but only how it looks on the page • Don’t be sold a flashy image without think about how it will work and how will you maintain it
  20. 20. Define Content Owners • Identify who will own sections of your intranet (prior to launching) • Make sure these people know that they have a new responsibility • Make sure these people are trained in the ‘how’ • Keep content fresh – specifically if you have an “informational” type site. • Stale content means no one cares – or you’re not doing anything • Users can lose interest quick if your site seem ‘stale’ • When latest documents are released make sure they are first added to your sites (don’t wait)
  21. 21. Enabling User Interaction • Enable some of the social features like ratings and comments. • These can help with search relevancy and improving findability • Users know they are being monitored and will (typically) self-police themselves • Provide mechanism for users to report feedback to the site and/or content admins • Community Template – good for FAQs or Site Help [Forum] • Use Yammer or User Profiles – let users build profiles with pictures
  22. 22. Utilize Search • Make sure search is operational and crawling your content periodically • Test queries and verify that you are getting results periodically • Use search analytics to see what your users are looking for • To improve findability use content types and tag with a managed meta data. • Lastly make sure you’re sensitive information is secure!!!
  23. 23. Use Development Patterns & Practices • Check out the Office Dev – Patterns and Practices (PnP) • http://dev.office.com/patterns-and-practices • Check out the Office UI Fabric • http://dev.office.com/fabric • Try to build client side web parts or apps over traditional C# • Use REST, JSOM, AJAX, & loaders • Try, catch and handle your coding errors • Don’t customize the out of the box display templates, page Layouts or master pages – make your own! • Beware of the branding tax – you can pay now or you can pay later
  24. 24. The Future of SharePoint UX
  25. 25. Everything is Subject to Change …and it will
  26. 26. Most Recent Change – Document Library • Microsoft Document Library
  27. 27. A ton of new features • UX alignment with OneDrive • Aligning the user experience so they don’t need to learn how to use a library differently • Responsive – works the same on a mobile phone • Modernized meta data entry – it’s quicker and more seamless • Resize, Move, & Hide Columns • Link Sharing • File Pinning • Recent Activity Panel • Right click for context menu • A new Grid View • Create Links to other files • New Image Preview Viewer • Details pane shows meta data
  28. 28. New Home Page for O365 • Simpler, responsive design • Immediate access to all your online applications • New tool tips help • Recent applications • Seamless Office install
  29. 29. What else… • The user experience will change, it has to in order to compete • Expect to see responsive improvements • Expect cleaner, simpler interfaces
  30. 30. UI as a Service • Subscription based model • No need to pay for expensive consultants to implement the service, maintenance, or customize it • Installs right on top of SharePoint or Office 365 • 100% mobile solutions • Can help increase user adoption by simplifying the interface
  31. 31. Examples of UIaaS Collaboration, file-sharing and social made easy, effortless and mobile Beezy offers the most comprehensive set of features delivered in one unique and elegant User Experience
  32. 32. Examples of UIaaS Boost adoption, mobile, enhanced collaboration
  33. 33. The Future of SharePoint https://resources.office.com/en-us-landing-the-future-of- sharepoint.html
  34. 34. • SharePoint Saturday New York • Free Event, open to public • All Day Training – 55 speakers from around the globe. • 7 simultaneous sessions training sessions to choose from • Business, Management, Cloud, IT Pro, Admin, End User, Development • Saturday, July 30, 2016 from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM (EDT) • Microsoft, Times Square • http://www.spsevents.org/city/NYC/NYC2016
  35. 35. Contact • Blog - www.thomasdaly.net • Twitter - @_tomdaly_ • Email • Personal: tom.m.daly@gmail.com • Business: tdaly@bandrsolutions.com • New Jersey SharePoint / Office 365 User Group • 4th Tuesday of each Month • 6:30pm – 8:00pm • Microsoft, Iselin, NJ • www.njspug.com
  36. 36. Resources • Search Analytics • New Analytics in SharePoint 2013 • 5 ways to improve Accessibility • Accessibility in SharePoint 2013 • What is UX Design? 15 Users Experience Experts Weigh In • Changes to the SharePoint Document Library • SharePoint Document Library UI? – article summarizing Yammer IT Pro Network post of Lincoln DeMaris • O365 Help - Microsoft Document Library • New Home Page for Office 365 • Beezy • SimplySo

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • For example: A Chef – picks the perfect ingredients that go together. They prepare the meal at a precise temperature for a specific amount of time. They season it to enhance the flavors. They position each element of the food on the plate. Or go to Friday’s – frozen food, thrown on a plate, prepared by an untrained food prep who probably has little to know experience with food.

    A pen – you know a good pen when you pick up and write with it. Why? Because it does just that and the ink flows out smoothly and cleanly. When you pick it up it fits perfectly in between your fingers. Words flow out of it effortlessly. Ink is not spraying and smearing. You can tell a crappy pen when you have to press hard or scribble a few lines to prep it. The ink comes out sometimes and maybe a blob. It’s just blah, but yes I can write my name.
  • Can anyone explain why?
  • Example: the UI of your car would be the controls, the seats, the material, the placement of the steering wheel. The UX of your car would be when you test drive it and you take a turn or accelerate or stop when you need to.
  • There are several opinions on what constitutes UX. I most like Peter Morville’s “User Experience Honeycomb”


    Peter – is an expert in information architecture and user experience. He’s written a bunch of books and advise some of the most well known companies. He’s a teacher and blogger who’s been covered by Business Weekm NPR, The Economist, The Washing Post and the Wall street journal
  • SharePoint falls into a weird area because it’s not typically something users want to use but rather have to use for their job.

    This does not mean that anything is acceptable. If it didn’t provide ‘value’ then organizations wouldn’t use it.
  • Things like if the site is being monitored, a user can know they can go on there and someone is overseeing.

    If you click on a link will it go a file or the correct place?


  • Search Anayltics
    https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219554.aspx#BKMK_TheDifferentType
  • User need to get in and around your intranet in a minimal amount of clicks

    Very often our customers spend a great deal of time planning site collection topologies and team site templates, with exactly how many libraries should hold specifically which types of documents and none other. That's great. But it really is not worth a penny if your metadata - your information architecture - AND your search configuration are not getting the same level of attention.

    Use concise and consistent metadata for all your teams. Do not design your web sites and content types in silos. Strive for generic, company-wide metadata fields instead of data for each small specific team. Think common denominator.
    Instead of trying to cover everything from the start, come up with a minimal set and keep it simple. Use Content Types to allow for future expansion.

    Minimize the navigational depth of your sites, enhance out of the box navigation
    Design your topology for your users, not just to please your executives. intranet topologies carefully match the corporate organizational or even brick-and-mortar layout - until the next acquisition or reorg.
    But do they have to match? In this information age, is topology really relevant to your users



  • Section 508 Framework for SharePoint
    SharePoint is shipped as Section 508 compliant.  The problem with accessibility comes after application developers start customizing look and feel or implementing homegrown or third party tools to make the platform more useful.

    Accessibility in SharePoint 2013
    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/jj841103.aspx


    5 ways to improve Accessibility
    Access to "More Accessible Mode“
    Skip to Content Links
    Heading Order
    Use of landmarks
    Alternative Text


  • too often I hear "We definitely need a large image rotator on the home page" or "We absolutely need to show the weather". You need to take 1 step back and tell me, why do you need to show the weather on every page? People can get the weather on their watch or phone so is it critical to have on the home page? It's might very well be critical but that’s up to you to determine. The same goes for the jumbotron caliber rotator. What types of information and value with that provide to your users. We know for sure it's going to take up about half their screen, but will it provide a high level of value for the space it's consuming.
  • Content Owners - Who are these people and do they even know that they've been secretly promoted? You need to identify who will own sections of your intranet if you have not already done so. It may be 1 or many people, hopefully not just one person is stuck updated everything. Break up pages or sections and give ownership to the people closest to that area or the person most well suited. During the design process you should also be identifying the areas that will need updating, the frequency that those areas should be updated, who will be doing the updates. If they are not tech savvy then you need to think about training them.
     
    Keep it Fresh - Stale content is a sure way to lose your users interest. I know, some sites might not change that often and that might be perfectly fine if they are not in the limelight. I am mostly referring to areas of the site, such as landing pages, where you have a news feed, articles, events, or images. If you have a news section and the last entry is from 5 months ago, then that's basically a dead area of your site. No one's going there and if you add a new article then chances are that no one will see it or notice it. I see this happen quite frequently but this point is further compounded if your home page is stale. Keep your content recent and update it frequently.
  • Some other notes – when launching a new feature or product make a game out of it.

    Make sure people know what you have
  • Lincoln DeMaris – posted on the ITPRO Yammer network

    Simplified by have one code base across products
    Aligning the user experience so they don’t need to learn how to use a library differently
    allowed them to address some long-standing usability issues – for example, you can finally upload folders in the browser!
    Responsive – works the same on a mobile phone
    Modernized meta data entry – it’s quicker and more seamless

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