eMOOCs for Personalised Online Learning:
A Diversity Perspective
Tanja Jadin & Martina Gaisch
Page 2
Underlying Rationale
Demographic Diversity
Micro cultural approaches vs. macro culture
Big 6 (age, gender, sexual o...
Page 3
Method
Desktop research: review of existing instructional
design approaches
Drawing on collaborative & constructivi...
Page 4EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Instructional Design for
eMOOCS
4
Page 5EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Profiling
 Individual learning
preferences
 Previous knowledge base
 Excpected learning
outcome...
Page 6EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Forming & Contextualisation
 Team building based on
profiling
 Advanced organisers and
structure...
Page 7EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Problem Outline & Common
Ground
 Introduction of the
problem in form of
shared objects (can be
an...
Page 8EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Exploration
 Content exploration
from a multitude of
perspectives
 Supportive role of
facilitato...
Page 9EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Joint Collaboration
 Working on the
shared object
 Working in small
groups to develop a
first pr...
Page 10EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Peer Review & External
Feedback
 Presenting the shared
object to other groups
 Getting feedback...
Page 11EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Modification
 Based on the
previous phase and
critical reflection the
shared object will be
furt...
Page 12EMOOCs 2016, Graz
Reflection
 Collaborative
reflection on the team
results
 Individual reflection
regarding the l...
Page 13
Reflection and Discussion
 Instructional design for personalised online learning
and collaborative knowledge crea...
Page 14
If we teach today as we taught
yesterday, we rob our children of
tomorrow. (John Dewey)
Prof.(FH) Mag. Dr. Tanja J...
Page 15
References
Guàrdia, L., Maina, M., & Sangrà, A. (2013). MOOC design principles: A pedagogical ap-
proach from the ...
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eMOOCs for Personalised Online Learning: A Diversity Perspective

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Presentation at the eMOOC conference in Graz, 2016

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eMOOCs for Personalised Online Learning: A Diversity Perspective

  1. 1. eMOOCs for Personalised Online Learning: A Diversity Perspective Tanja Jadin & Martina Gaisch
  2. 2. Page 2 Underlying Rationale Demographic Diversity Micro cultural approaches vs. macro culture Big 6 (age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, ideology, disability) Diversity management Cognitive Diversity Differences in perceptual processes, interpretation, problem-solving strategies leads to informed decision making, enlarged problem solving skills, more creative and innovative solutions in groups Positive impact on team decisions, reduced socio-emotional conflict Learning differences: strategies, preferences Trialogical Learning Collaborative knowledge building Inquiry and problem-based learning on a shared object EMOOCs 2016, Graz 2
  3. 3. Page 3 Method Desktop research: review of existing instructional design approaches Drawing on collaborative & constructivist learning individual differences are in line with the constructivist learning paradigm (including MOOCs) Main results were collected and a criteria catalogue was developed for the instructional design of an eMOOC Main set of criteria taken from Karagiorgi & Symeou (2005), Guàrdia, Maina, & Sangrà (2013), Johnson & Aragon (2003), Jonassen & Grabowski (1993) EMOOCs 2016, Graz 3
  4. 4. Page 4EMOOCs 2016, Graz Instructional Design for eMOOCS 4
  5. 5. Page 5EMOOCs 2016, Graz Profiling  Individual learning preferences  Previous knowledge base  Excpected learning outcomes  Learning goals  Relevant for team building and reflection 5
  6. 6. Page 6EMOOCs 2016, Graz Forming & Contextualisation  Team building based on profiling  Advanced organisers and structured overview  Individual content selection  Different learning paths and scaffolding for learners (facilitators are key) 6
  7. 7. Page 7EMOOCs 2016, Graz Problem Outline & Common Ground  Introduction of the problem in form of shared objects (can be an idea, a task, a product..)  Common ground is a prerequisite for shared views (expectations, experiences) 7
  8. 8. Page 8EMOOCs 2016, Graz Exploration  Content exploration from a multitude of perspectives  Supportive role of facilitator  Cognitive and collaborative tools  Overview of the problem outline 8
  9. 9. Page 9EMOOCs 2016, Graz Joint Collaboration  Working on the shared object  Working in small groups to develop a first prototype, a concept  Crucial: role of the facilitator 9
  10. 10. Page 10EMOOCs 2016, Graz Peer Review & External Feedback  Presenting the shared object to other groups  Getting feedback from external experts  Reflective process, including feedback in phase 7 10
  11. 11. Page 11EMOOCs 2016, Graz Modification  Based on the previous phase and critical reflection the shared object will be further developed and improved  Facilator serves as mediator and provides support  Results are published and shared through social media 11
  12. 12. Page 12EMOOCs 2016, Graz Reflection  Collaborative reflection on the team results  Individual reflection regarding the learning goals and expectation (in line with initial profiling) 12
  13. 13. Page 13 Reflection and Discussion  Instructional design for personalised online learning and collaborative knowledge creation  Further research is needed to test and evaulate this framework  Role of shared artifacts and mediating tools in learning with MOOCs  Role of demographic and cognitive diversity  MOOC or not MOOC? Follow or leave the paths? EMOOCs 2016, Graz 13
  14. 14. Page 14 If we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow. (John Dewey) Prof.(FH) Mag. Dr. Tanja Jadin & Mag. Dr. Martina Gaisch University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria tanja.jadin@fh-hagenberg.at martina.gaisch@fh-hagenberg.at EMOOCs 2016, Graz 14
  15. 15. Page 15 References Guàrdia, L., Maina, M., & Sangrà, A. (2013). MOOC design principles: A pedagogical ap- proach from the learner’s perspective. eLearning Papers, (33). Johnson, S.D. & Aragon, S. (2003). An instructional strategy framework for online learning environments. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 11, 31-43. Jonassen, D. H., & Grabowski, B. (1993). Individual differences and instruction. New York: Allen & Bacon. Karagiorgi, Y. & Symeou, L. (2005). Translating constructivism into instructional design: Potential and limitations. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 8(1), 17-27. EMOOCs 2016, Graz 15

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