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  1. 1. Et rus c an Art W l l i am V. Gani s, PhD i
  2. 2. Began arriving about 1200 BCE; by 800 BCE, they had established a number of city states; by 600 BCE, they had taken over Rome. Called themselves the Rasenna, the Greeks called them Tyrrhenioi; the Romans called them the Etruscans. Came from eastern Mediterranean, possibly Asia Minor. Their land was called Etruria.
  3. 3. Etruscan Political System • Independent, fortified city-states. • Formed small confederacies. • Had a strong military that dominated all the surrounding peoples. • By 6c BCE, the Etruscan military had conquered much of the Italian peninsula,including Rome and the island of Corsica.
  4. 4. Etruscans
  5. 5. Etruscan Military 6c BCE Chariot Bronze Warrior
  6. 6. Etruscan Writing • Most inscriptions found on tombs and monuments and mirrors. • We can pronounce Etruscan words, because they use an alphabet similar to Greek, but we have no clue about their meaning. • Over 10,000 Etruscan inscriptions.
  7. 7. Lemnos Stelae – 6c BCE
  8. 8. The Etruscan Alphabet
  9. 9. Etruscan Writing Tablet
  10. 10. Models of Etruscan temples as described by Vitruvius ca. 6th century B.C.E.
  11. 11. Apulu (Apollo) from the Portonaccio Temple, Veii, Italy ca. 510-500 B.C.E. painted terracotta 71 in. high
  12. 12. Apulu (Apollo) from the Portonaccio Temple, Veii, Italy ca. 510-500 B.C.E. painted terracotta 71 in. high
  13. 13. Tumulus from Cerveteri, Italy 7th to 2nd centuries B.C.E.
  14. 14. Interior of the tomb of the reliefs Cerveteri, Italy 3rd century B.C.E.
  15. 15. Sarcophagus with reclining couple from Cerveteri, Italy ca. 520 B.C.E. painted terracotta 45 1/2 in. high
  16. 16. Sarcophagus with reclining couple from Cerveteri, Italy ca. 520 B.C.E. painted terracotta 45 1/2 in. high
  17. 17. Chimera of Arezzo from the Arezzo, Italy 1st half of 4th century B.C.E. bronze 31 1/2 in. high
  18. 18. Chimera of Arezzo from the Arezzo, Italy 1st half of 4th century B.C.E. bronze 31 1/2 in. high
  19. 19. The Italian Peninsula • Separated on three sides called the “Mare Nostrum” or our sea • Approximately 1000 km long by 200 km wide • Separated from the rest of mainland Europe by the Alps in the north • Alps served as a formidable protective barrier from northern invaders • The Apennine Mountains ran the length of the Peninsula, and made communication and travel
  20. 20. The Italian Peninsula Four Growth Factors • Important rivers included the Po and 1. Mild Climate Tiber rivers 2. Agricultural prosperity • Rome itself grew as a small village along the Tiber R. 3. Seclusion from Europe • Although generally fertile, rapid 4. Central position in the growth meant Romans came to rely on Mediterranean grain imports from Egypt and Sicily. • Climate is generally mild, though it can get quite hot in summer. Founding of Rome Forerunners of the Romans • According to Livy, there were seven • Sophisticated people in the kings of Rome Northeastern portion of the Peninsula • The first was Romulus, allegedly the • Most information we know is son of Mars, god of war. collected from burial mounds • Founding myth, Romulus and Remus • Native to the Peninsula, descended raised by a wolf from earlier peoples • Discovered by a Shepard on the • The Etruscans flourished at the same Palantine who raised them time as the Carthaginians and the • The two eventually challenged each Greeks other for supremacy over
  21. 21. The Kings of Rome • Etruscan expanded control southward and absorbed Rome • First King after Romulus was Tarquinius, who built the temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus • Urban renewal programs were enacted under subsequent Kings • There is remarkable similarities • Last King was Tarquin the Proud, between Roman & Etruscan worlds who was overthrown by Partricians in • Numerals, fondness for sport, the the increasing powerful city of Rome belief in Hades and the underworld, • The Republic was founded thereafter the augury and superstition all inherited on Rome from the Etruscans • Offices and political traditions like the use of ivory thrones and purple robes of the Etruscan royalty adopted by Romans • The fasces was an Etruscan axe and bundle of wooden rods that became a symbol of power in Rome
  22. 22. Capitoline Wolf from Rome, Italy ca. 500-480 B.C.E. bronze 31 1/2 in. high
  23. 23. Porta Marzia (Gate of Mars) Perugia, Italy 2nd century B.C.E.

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Transkript

    1. 1. Et rus c an Art W l l i am V. Gani s, PhD i
    2. 2. Began arriving about 1200 BCE; by 800 BCE, they had established a number of city states; by 600 BCE, they had taken over Rome. Called themselves the Rasenna, the Greeks called them Tyrrhenioi; the Romans called them the Etruscans. Came from eastern Mediterranean, possibly Asia Minor. Their land was called Etruria.
    3. 3. Etruscan Political System • Independent, fortified city-states. • Formed small confederacies. • Had a strong military that dominated all the surrounding peoples. • By 6c BCE, the Etruscan military had conquered much of the Italian peninsula,including Rome and the island of Corsica.
    4. 4. Etruscans
    5. 5. Etruscan Military 6c BCE Chariot Bronze Warrior
    6. 6. Etruscan Writing • Most inscriptions found on tombs and monuments and mirrors. • We can pronounce Etruscan words, because they use an alphabet similar to Greek, but we have no clue about their meaning. • Over 10,000 Etruscan inscriptions.
    7. 7. Lemnos Stelae – 6c BCE
    8. 8. The Etruscan Alphabet
    9. 9. Etruscan Writing Tablet
    10. 10. Models of Etruscan temples as described by Vitruvius ca. 6th century B.C.E.
    11. 11. Apulu (Apollo) from the Portonaccio Temple, Veii, Italy ca. 510-500 B.C.E. painted terracotta 71 in. high
    12. 12. Apulu (Apollo) from the Portonaccio Temple, Veii, Italy ca. 510-500 B.C.E. painted terracotta 71 in. high
    13. 13. Tumulus from Cerveteri, Italy 7th to 2nd centuries B.C.E.
    14. 14. Interior of the tomb of the reliefs Cerveteri, Italy 3rd century B.C.E.
    15. 15. Sarcophagus with reclining couple from Cerveteri, Italy ca. 520 B.C.E. painted terracotta 45 1/2 in. high
    16. 16. Sarcophagus with reclining couple from Cerveteri, Italy ca. 520 B.C.E. painted terracotta 45 1/2 in. high
    17. 17. Chimera of Arezzo from the Arezzo, Italy 1st half of 4th century B.C.E. bronze 31 1/2 in. high
    18. 18. Chimera of Arezzo from the Arezzo, Italy 1st half of 4th century B.C.E. bronze 31 1/2 in. high
    19. 19. The Italian Peninsula • Separated on three sides called the “Mare Nostrum” or our sea • Approximately 1000 km long by 200 km wide • Separated from the rest of mainland Europe by the Alps in the north • Alps served as a formidable protective barrier from northern invaders • The Apennine Mountains ran the length of the Peninsula, and made communication and travel
    20. 20. The Italian Peninsula Four Growth Factors • Important rivers included the Po and 1. Mild Climate Tiber rivers 2. Agricultural prosperity • Rome itself grew as a small village along the Tiber R. 3. Seclusion from Europe • Although generally fertile, rapid 4. Central position in the growth meant Romans came to rely on Mediterranean grain imports from Egypt and Sicily. • Climate is generally mild, though it can get quite hot in summer. Founding of Rome Forerunners of the Romans • According to Livy, there were seven • Sophisticated people in the kings of Rome Northeastern portion of the Peninsula • The first was Romulus, allegedly the • Most information we know is son of Mars, god of war. collected from burial mounds • Founding myth, Romulus and Remus • Native to the Peninsula, descended raised by a wolf from earlier peoples • Discovered by a Shepard on the • The Etruscans flourished at the same Palantine who raised them time as the Carthaginians and the • The two eventually challenged each Greeks other for supremacy over
    21. 21. The Kings of Rome • Etruscan expanded control southward and absorbed Rome • First King after Romulus was Tarquinius, who built the temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus • Urban renewal programs were enacted under subsequent Kings • There is remarkable similarities • Last King was Tarquin the Proud, between Roman & Etruscan worlds who was overthrown by Partricians in • Numerals, fondness for sport, the the increasing powerful city of Rome belief in Hades and the underworld, • The Republic was founded thereafter the augury and superstition all inherited on Rome from the Etruscans • Offices and political traditions like the use of ivory thrones and purple robes of the Etruscan royalty adopted by Romans • The fasces was an Etruscan axe and bundle of wooden rods that became a symbol of power in Rome
    22. 22. Capitoline Wolf from Rome, Italy ca. 500-480 B.C.E. bronze 31 1/2 in. high
    23. 23. Porta Marzia (Gate of Mars) Perugia, Italy 2nd century B.C.E.

    Hinweis der Redaktion

  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
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