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Ola ailp presentation all slides

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Ola ailp presentation all slides

  1. 1. July 11, 2019 Library as a community building platform. LGA. Idea Exchange. Cambridge Public Library
  2. 2. Introduction and Presentation outline 1. Design strategies for a successful integration of facilities 3. Case – Study : Blue Mountains Public Library Emira Galeteanu, BAS, MArch, TSA, OAA LGA Architectural Partners Dr. Sabrina ER Saunder, CEO Blue Mountains Public Library Stephen Abram, MLS, FSLA Lighthouse Consulting, Inc. 2. Value propositions, funding methods and trends. Library as a community building platform. LGA. Kitchener Public library
  3. 3. Chicago heat wave
  4. 4. Chicago heat wave
  5. 5. What libraries are about. Creating connections: LGA. Kitchener Public library People to knowledge People to people
  6. 6. This integration of different facilities and, in turn, programmes that have the potential of attracting a more diverse group of people. “The Third Place” LGA. Idea Exchange. Cambridge Public Library This potential should be built-in in the architecture of the libraries that we build in the future.
  7. 7. How do you purposely build to create connections? How do you keep the collections as a core of the library but create a new hybrid space for lifelong learning, inspiration and creation? LGA. Scarborough Civic Centre Branch. TPL.
  8. 8. The Little Free Library “I’ve met more people since our little library came here than I’ve met in 10 or 20 years.”
  9. 9. The Little Free Library These small libraries, combined with the functions of the urban realm, completely changed how people related to the space and to each other.
  10. 10. The Little Free Library These small libraries, combined with the functions of the urban realm, completely changed how people related to the space and to each other. • Adaptable and hybrid • Accessible / Exposed and on-route • Inviting - Reach out to the people Design strategies:
  11. 11. Adaptable Spaces LGA. Kitchener Public library
  12. 12. Adaptable Spaces LGA. Kitchener Public library
  13. 13. Adaptable Spaces LGA. Kitchener Public library
  14. 14. Adaptable Spaces The Craigleith Heritage Depot Museum, Library and Cultural Centre The Blue Mountains Public Library
  15. 15. Adaptable Spaces The Craigleith Heritage Depot Museum, Library and Cultural Centre The Blue Mountains Public Library
  16. 16. Adaptable Spaces LGA. Scarborough Civic Centre Branch
  17. 17. Adaptable Spaces LGA. Scarborough Civic Centre Branch
  18. 18. Adaptable Spaces L.E. Shore Memorial Library, The Blue Mountains Public Library
  19. 19. Adaptable Spaces L.E. Shore Memorial Library, The Blue Mountains Public Library
  20. 20. Circulation SHL - Dokk 1. Aarhus, Denmark
  21. 21. Circulation SHL - Dokk 1. Aarhus, Denmark
  22. 22. Circulation LGA. Queen's Square Idea Exchange Cambridge Public Library
  23. 23. Circulation SHL Halifax Central Library
  24. 24. Circulation SHL Halifax Central Library
  25. 25. Circulation Borch and Fjord + SHL Hjørring Bibliotek Danmark
  26. 26. Circulation Borch and Fjord + SHL Hjørring Bibliotek Danmark
  27. 27. Reaching out SHL - Dokk 1. Aarhus, Denmark
  28. 28. Reaching out David Adjaye Idea store – Whitechapel. London. UK
  29. 29. Reaching out L.E. Shore Memorial Library, The Blue Mountains Public Library
  30. 30. Reaching out L.E. Shore Memorial Library, The Blue Mountains Public Library
  31. 31. Reaching out LGA. Scarborough Civic Centre Branch. TPL.
  32. 32. Why Public Libraries Partner with Cultural Institutions
  33. 33. • “Do partnerships help produce a better desired outcome? Can public libraries gain from integrating with museums and members of the museology field? • There are factors for both advocating and resisting long lasting partnerships or integrations between these two organizations. • However, the core of both fields represents significant pillars in society’s public programming, engagement and education.” https://princh.com/integrating-libraries-and- museums/#.XR-UY5ArKM9
  34. 34. Public libraries are known to continuously evolve and adapt with advancements in technology and society. Not only do public libraries evolve but they tend to be the platform to educate the public about the information they have adopted. Think new technologies, media, and knowledge. Public libraries are safe spaces which allow members of the community exposure to new technology which helps them develop skills such as 3-D printing, laser cutting, music editing etc. which is not readily accessible to the public in the same way.
  35. 35. Museums also impact the community and the visitors they serve. As stated in “The role of the Museum in Society” by Emmanuel N. Arinze, museums traditionally collect materials and objects of cultural, religious, historical importance to preserve, research and present them for display to the public for educational purposes as well as enjoyment.
  36. 36. • Libraries have small, long term exhibits • Museums have permanent public library stations • A large-scale library & museum hybrid is NOT dependent on shared space • Negotiate and converse for win-win Active cooperation between large community pillars, like libraries and museums, could provide a modern, grandiose structure incorporating history, culture and resources to continuously enrich their communities.
  37. 37. What’s the Most Popular Activity that Ontarians Choose? Culture | Art | Sport | Shopping | Fun
  38. 38. How do Public Libraries compare in the cultural mosaic of Museums, Galleries, Theatre and Music?
  39. 39. CULTURAL ACTIVITIES BY TYPE: PERCENTAGE OF CANADIANS ATTENDING Any Museum: 32%
  40. 40. CULTURAL ACTIVITIES BY TYPE: PERCENTAGE OF CANADIANS ATTENDING Any Museum: 32% Public & Commercial Art Galleries: 33%
  41. 41. CULTURAL ACTIVITIES BY TYPE: PERCENTAGE OF CANADIANS ATTENDING Any Museum: 32% Public & Commercial Art Galleries: 33% Any Performing Arts: 55.0%
  42. 42. CULTURAL ACTIVITIES BY TYPE: PERCENTAGE OF CANADIANS ATTENDING Any Museum: 32% Public & Commercial Art Galleries: 33% Any Performing Arts: 55.0% Public Libraries: 73%
  43. 43. Let’s dig deeper into music and concerts…
  44. 44. Let’s dig deeper into music and concerts… 73% 37.6% 27.5% 13.7% 9.0% 3.2% 7.2% 7.4% 21.3% Music and Concert Attendance: Percentage of Canadians Going Public Libraries Any performing art Theatre, classical & Dance All Classical Music Symphonic music Opera Choral Music Dance Pop Music
  45. 45. Let’s dig deeper into music and concerts… 73% 37.6% 27.5% 13.7% 9.0% 3.2% 7.2% 7.4% 21.3% Music and Concert Attendance: Percentage of Canadians Going Public Libraries Any performing art Theatre, classical & Dance All Classical Music Symphonic music Opera Choral Music Dance Pop Music (Ontarians love culture. We just REALLY love our libraries.)
  46. 46. What about Sports?
  47. 47. What about Sports? The NHL sold 21.6 million tickets.
  48. 48. What about Sports? The NBA sold 21.4 million tickets.
  49. 49. What about Sports? The NFL sold 17.3 million tickets.
  50. 50. What about Sports? Major League Baseball sold 73.7 million tickets
  51. 51. How do Libraries compare?
  52. 52. Libraries get 72.5 million visits each year (In Ontario alone!)
  53. 53. That’s 12 million more than the NHL, NHL and NBA combined…
  54. 54. Or to put it another way…
  55. 55. Or to put it another way… If the Blue Jays, the Leafs, the Senators, the Raptors, the Thunder, the Furies, the Marlies, Toronto FC AND Toronto Rock all played to capacity crowds in one day (a busy day for the Air Canada Centre, admittedly, but stay with us on this…)
  56. 56. Or to put it another way… They’d still see around 25,000 fewer people than Ontarian libraries get on every single day of the year. That’s right – on average, libraries in the province get 198,000 visits a day, every day.
  57. 57. Nope. ALL of Canada had 16 million foreign tourists. That’s less than a quarter of the number who visit their public library in Ontario alone.
  58. 58. Libraries offer great programs… Ontario’s Libraries offer over 250,000 in 2016 which attracted over 4.5 Million residents! We’ve grown over 82% in ten years, attended by over 4.5 million people in 2016 alone!
  59. 59. Libraries offer great programs… Ontario’s Libraries offer over 250,000 in 2016 which attracted over 4.5 Million residents! We’ve grown over 82% in ten years, attended by over 4.5 million people in 2016 alone! • Early literacy and early learning • Summer Reading Club • Homework Help • Teen Programs • Newcomers to Canada & Ontario • Careers, Skills, and Job Help • Genealogy • Business, entrepreneur and community development • Seniors programs • Book clubs • Culture Days e.g.
  60. 60. Libraries offer great programs… Ontario’s Libraries offer over 250,000 in 2016 which attracted over 4.5 Million residents! We’ve grown over 82% in ten years, attended by over 4.5 million people in 2016 alone! • Early literacy and early learning • Summer Reading Club • Homework Help • Teen Programs • Newcomers to Canada & Ontario • Careers, Skills, and Job Help • Genealogy • Business, entrepreneur and community development • Seniors programs • Book clubs • Culture Days Millions engage with their neighbours through community programs
  61. 61. Ontarians love their culture and sports (and that’s great!)
  62. 62. But they love and visit their public libraries more.
  63. 63. And Ontario’s Libraries are so much more than just culture and recreation!
  64. 64. • Excellent Return on Investment • Strong Economic Development and Impact • Great Employment Support • Welcoming New Canadians • Provable Early Literacy Development • Ongoing Lifelong Support for Formal Education and Homework Help • Serving the whole community equitably • Affordable access to community resources • Access to Government Services and e-government • Questions Deserve Quality Answers • Support Cultural Vitality • AND Recognized and Valued Leisure Activities for majority of Ontarians The Public Library value proposition is strong and includes (but isn’t limited to):
  65. 65. • Excellent Return on Investment • Strong Economic Development and Impact • Great Employment Support • Welcoming New Canadians • Provable Early Literacy Development • Ongoing Lifelong Support for Formal Education and Homework Help • Serving the whole community equitably • Affordable access to community resources • Access to Government Services and e-government • Questions Deserve Quality Answers • Support Cultural Vitality • AND Recognized and Valued Leisure Activities for majority of Ontarians The Public Library value proposition is strong and includes (but isn’t limited to):
  66. 66. Ontario’s Public Libraries Simply put: Now more than ever before, Ontario’s Public Libraries play a critical role in the social, educational, cultural and economic success of the communities in our province.
  67. 67. Ontario’s Public Libraries Public Libraries are an essential investment in the future of our communities and are essential drivers of success in school preparedness, reading readiness, economic and employment success, and social equity.
  68. 68. Ontario’s Public Libraries As the development of the knowledge economy progresses, public libraries are a vital link for every resident and every community to ensure success of all Ontarians, regardless of location or background.
  69. 69. YOUR Public Library We support your goals for learning, recreation, culture and arts, creativity, family, making, and engaging with your community. And we love reading too.
  70. 70. In the time you’ve spent at this presentation, thousands of people have visited a library in Ontario….
  71. 71. So Public Libraries have something to offer in a partnership with cultural institutions!
  72. 72. Why? • WIIFU – What’s in it for us? • We can enlarge our programs portfolio beyond our walls. • We can increase our number of programs with partnerships to access professional talent at cultural institutions. • We can offer space for passive programming through galleries and exhibit curations that drive traffic to our partners. • We can support culture walks and ours with local history societies, genealogical groups, heritage preservation groups, etc.
  73. 73. Why! • WIIFT – What’s in it for them? • We have access to MORE community members than nearly anyone locally. • We can contribute to tourism and economic development strategies. • We have resources (like books, databases and archives) that enhance curation and programming. • We have larger attendance in person and digitally! • We have a growing social media footprint for engagement! • We can provide opportunities for ‘extend-your-experience’ events and liaisons through website links, digital archives, books and web/bibliographies, etc. • Public Libraries have access to DC/CBC funds – museums and cultural institutions don’t…
  74. 74. But How? • Lots of Options – Start at the basics . . . • Build Relationships first • Start a local culture team- beyond the SMT – a coalition of the willing • Break down the siloes • Undertake MOU’s when needed / appropriate • Share major events (Fairs, Maker Faires, Sidewalk events, Park programs, etc.) • Understand your Development Charge Regime (and the new CBCs) • Share some programs
  75. 75. We already have a great start! 268 Library Systems Culture Programs and Attendees from the 2017 Annual Survey of Public Libraries / Ontario Public Library Statistics Public Library and First Nation Public Library Culture Programs and Attendees Maker space, Digital media lab, Self- publishing - Number of Programs Maker space, Digital media lab, Self- publishing - Number of Attendees Genealogy, local history, Doors Open - Number of Programs Genealogy, local history, Doors Open - Number of Attendees Culture Days, poetry and story readings, art shows - Number of Programs Culture Days, poetry and story readings, art shows - Number of Attendees First Nation Communities Reads - Number of Programs First Nation Communities Reads - Number of Attendees Indigenous language training and retention - Number of Programs Indigenous language training and retention - Number of Attendees Book Clubs - Number of Programs Book Clubs - Number of Attendees Summary 11,966 139,855 1,057 19,627 7,604 204,188 46 1,779 409 2,670 9,576 81,390 © 2017 Ontario Public Library Statistics are collected and published by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport
  76. 76. Taking it to the Next Level: 2017 Culture Partnerships In this report, 205 public libraries and First Nation public libraries report 843 partnerships with the Cultural sector. 135 report Community Museum partnerships 66 report art gallery partnerships 92 report municipal cultural planning partnerships 65 report archives partnerships 111 report heritage partnerships 70 report ethno-cultural and newcomer service organization partnerships 92 report 304 other cultural partnerships For Other Cultural Partnerships information, see "Other Cultural Partners" sheet two of this report.
  77. 77. Handout: Real Partnership Inspirations Samples Samples2 Samples3 Volunteer Centre Culture and Research Department of Chippewas of Rama Dryden Area Anti-Racism Network Burlington Performing Arts Centre YMCA Novel Ideas Bookstore First Burlington Toastmasters John Howard Society Dryden Rotary Club CNIB/CELA Indigenious People of the community Shaw TV Art Gallery of Burlington Cornwall Transition +, Cornwall and Area Writer's Society, NaNoWriMo, Les Milles Feuilles St. Thomas Elgin Local Immigration Partnerships Burlington Mundialization Committee Hort, Salem Valley Quilters and Hill Spirits Mennonite Community Services Aylmer Burlington Age Friendly Council Dryden Trillium Lions Club South Simcoe Arts Community Living Hoshizaki House Women's Shelter Zoomer Essex - local seniors organization Halton Equity and Diversity Roundtable Lokah Sanga Yoga local Mad Science organization Halton Multicultural Council Dryden Genealogical Society Hackforge - Makespace programming Burlington Green Sunset Country Quilters Guild Journal communautaire Centre for Skills Development National Film Board Diversity Committee Halton Newcomer Strategy Group Dryden Days of Summer Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra Children's Delight Series Alzheimer Society of Kenora/Rainy River Districts St. John's Ambulance Theatre 17 Rainy Lake Orchestra Programs with our indiginous comunities Metis Nation of Ontario and the Indiginous Friendship Centr Patricia Regional Seniors Services Local Artists & Artisans Music, Dance and Drama Organizations Northern Ontario Writers Workshop United Native Friendship Centre Lanark County Libraries Dryden Historical Society Cornell Farms Maisons d'édition Kiwanis Club of Dryden Borderland Orchestra Golden Eagles Seniors Group Dryden Native Friendship Centre Kids and Company Heart and Stroke Foundation Horticultural Society Kakekalanicks Sudbury Legal Clinic Local media Niagara Concerts Historical Society Anishnaabemowin Revival Program(ARP), UCCM, M'Chigeeng Health Centre Ignite the Spirit Foundation Newcomer Services Horticultural Society Music Festival St. Johns "Paws For Reading" Pukaskwa National Park Arts & Culture Council Stratford Symphony Orchestra Ontario Arts Council Oshawa Senior Citizen's Centres Stratford Horticultural Society Club des aînées DRAAG Durham Region Area Archives Group RT04 - local tourism collective McKellar Recreation Committee DRAAC Durham Region Aboriginal Advisory Circle Perth County Information Network Artist's Guild (MAG) Galaxy Cinemas I Volunteer Perth Huron Theatre Group (Theatre Night in Merrickville) Ontario Genealogical Society Bruce Grey Chapter DigiWriting Milton Horticultural Society Friendship Centre (First Nations) Municipal Age Friendly Program Canadian Champion newspaper Pelham Art Club VillageNoel Wilfrid Laurier University Pelham Historical Society Festival des Folies Francofun Ontario Early Years Pelham Art Festival Spring Pulse Poetry Festival Literacy North Halton Bookclubs International Festival of Authors United Way of Milton Compass UNESCO / NFB of Canada / CFoLA / National Centre for Truth and Reconcilation / Library & Archives .. Authors County of Simcoe Definitely Superior MFN Anishnabemowin Program Petawawa MilitaryFamily Resource Centre Leanna Marshall, Indigenous artist / Community Arts and Heritage Education Project Muskoka Chautauqua Ontario Genealogical Society Thunder Bay Multicultural Association Festivals & Events Spark Photo Festival Community Arts & Heritage Education Project (CAHEP) and Confederation College Hispanic Canadian Alliance of Ontario Training and Learning Centre Ardelle Segetcheway, community member and guest speak Afghan Womens Organization Balsam Hill Women's Institute Sarah Johnson / Negahneewin Student Services Ontario Early Years Centre Durham French Employment Centre World War One Thunder Bay Centennial Durham West Probus Club TD Summer Reading Club Diversity Thunder Bay / Ardelle Sagetcheway Durham Unemployment Centre Pickering Concert Band City of Thunder Bay Cultural and Recreation Division (Youth Move) Brain Tumor Foundation of Canada Carea Community Health Centre Thunder Pride Probus Club of Ajax Clarington Public Library Sam Achneepineskum, Indigenous Elder, Traditional knowledge keeper and facilitator Pickering High School Oshawa Public Library CDCD Centre D'emploi de Durham Tamil Cultural and Academic Society of Durham
  78. 78. What to consider . . . • Museum standards • Archival standards • Library Standards • Development charge and funding issues • Admissions versus visitors • Focus on passive programs • Museum retail shops • Video walls • Historical character • Nature • Outside the walls • Museum passes • Partnerships • Website links • Social media integration • And more . . .
  79. 79. Let’s Talk!
  80. 80. Data Sources • http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/libraries/statistics2013/Summary_and_Comparison_Report_2013.pdf • http://www.culturalhrc.ca/announcements/2014/PR2014-09-10-e.php?gclid=CKfckba8jcgCFYsYHwodiZgGVg • https://stats.cfldb.ca • http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/87f0003x/2013001/t033-eng.htm • http://www.arts.on.ca/AssetFactory.aspx?did=415 • http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/publications/Ontario_Major_Festivals_and_Events_Attraction.pdf • http://www.slideshare.net/stephenabram1/market-probe-fopl-webinar-20151708animated • http://www.slideshare.net/stephenabram1/fopl-webinar-august1420154 All data is the latest publicly available and figures have been rounded Contact: sabram@fopl.ca
  81. 81. Image Sources 1st set of icons by Icons8 – see these and more at https://icons8.com/download-huge-windows8-set/#/web Otherwise all images in this presentation are free of copyrights and licensed under Creative Commons CC0 – they were sourced via Unsplash and Pixabay.
  82. 82. Your Library: where You are... See more at fopl.ca
  83. 83. Blue Mountains Public Library as a GLAM
  84. 84. Road to Today
  85. 85. Staffing & Operational Considerations
  86. 86. TheBlueMountainsLibrary.ca LibraryChair@TheBlueMountains.ca LibraryCEO@TheBlueMountains.ca BLUE MOUNTAINS PUBLIC LIBRARY

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