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5.applying socrates method in grammar sessions

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5.applying socrates method in grammar sessions

  1. 1. Tutor Vista Extensive Training Program for English Tutors Using Socratic Method in Grammar Sessions
  2. 2. CONTENTS Techniques of session handling  when students come with a specific grammar topic.  when students share a specific worksheet or assignment.  when students come to improve or brush up on their grammar skills.
  3. 3. Different Types of Students In Grammar sessions, you may work with a/an • student who would ask you to assist him/her with a specific grammar topic /questions. • student who needs help with homework or assignment. • ESL/EFL student or adult learner who would like to brush up on his/her grammar skills Irrespective of the type of the students you may get, ensure that you • Determine your students’ prior knowledge on a topic. • Begin with an example to hold the attention of the students. • Explain the concept (definition) and share more examples. • Confirm students’ understanding by giving a practice test. • Summarize what you’ve covered in the session. Let’s see how to cater to the needs of different types of students.
  4. 4. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic In general, students just mention “can you help me with english grammar?” “need help with grade 12 grammar.” They do not specify the topic as they  want to brush up on their grammar skills.  do not exactly know what kind of help they need. When a student doesn’t specify the topic,  Suggest a list of topics and ask the student to pick one, or  Provide a small pretest to identify his/her area of improvements. No Specific Topic List some topics Doesn’t Specify Picks one Provide a Pretest Check Prior Knowledge Choose a weak area Begin with an example Explain the concept Share more examples Confirm Understanding Summary
  5. 5. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic Contd… Tutor: Hello Jordan Student: Hey, I would like to review 9th grade English. Student: can you give me some worksheet prombles on grammar. Tutor: here’s a test based on grammar for 9 th grade. Tutor: let’s see how you perform. Student: wat do i do? Tutor: just mark the nouns in the sentences. Student: done Tutor: let’s see the correction. Student: kk Tutor: did you get it? so to brief you… Nouns are names of persons, places, things, or ideas. Student: ok Tutor: now the next exercise based on pronouns. Student: ok what is a pronoun.
  6. 6. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic Tutor: pronouns are used in place of nouns. Personal pronoun: I, me, you, he, him, she, her, it, we, us, they, them Possessive: my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, their, theirs Demonstrative: this, that, these, those Interrogative: what, which, who, whom, whose Indefinite: anybody, anyone, each, either, none, someone, somebody, both, everyone, neither, many, few, several… Tutor: now find these pronouns in the sentences given. Student: ok Tutor: please do the entire worksheet Student: i’m working. please give me sometime. Tutor: k. let’s check the answers now. Tutor: are you not clear with pronouns? There are lot of mistakes. Student: I’m not clear with pronouns. Tutor: The session is about to end Jordan. We can do the pronouns completely in the next session. Student: ok thanks for your help Tutor: hope to see you again Student: bye Tutor: Bye 
  7. 7. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic 1. Subject Verb Agreement 2. Pronoun Antecedent Agreement 3. Fragments and Run-ons 4. Misplaced & Dangling Modifiers 5. Faulty Parallelism 6. Unnecessary shift in tense Example: Scott is very good at Math his brother is hopeless. This sentence contains two independent clauses. However, without an appropriate mark of punctuation between them, the independent clauses run together. As a result, readers don't know where the first thought ends and the second one begins. Contd… Student: Hey, I would like to review 9th grade English. Student: can you give me some worksheet prombles on grammar. Tutor: Sure. Are you looking for help with any specific grammar topic? Student: not exactly. i just want to improve my grammar skills. Tutor: Ok. Let me suggest you some grade 9 topics; pick the one that you find challenging. Student: ok. My teacher says that my writing always contains run-on sentences. can you guide with me it? Tutor: Sure, with pleasure. Tutor: Let’s begin with an example. Tutor: In this example, two complete sentences are written as if they were a single sentence. Student: yes, no punctuation. Tutor: Good! Can you underline the two independent clauses in the sentence? Tutor: Excellent! Run-on sentences are when two or more independent clauses are connected without any form of punctuation between them.
  8. 8. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic Tutor: Is that clear so far? Student: yes Tutor: Let’s now see how to fix run-ons. Tutor: Can you give it a try, Jordan? Student: Sure. Tutor: Good try, Jordan! However, the conjunction ‘and’ is not the best choice as it joins two similar ideas. Actually both the clauses convey contrasting ideas. Student: so, use but, right? Tutor: Excellent job! You got it. Let’s now try the next rule. Student: ok. what is subordinating conjunction? Tutor: because, when, though, although, while, after, since, whether… Student: I remember now. Tutor: Adding a subordinate conjunction at the beginning of one of the independent clauses makes it dependent clause. Tutor: When the dependent clause is placed before the independent clause, it must be separated from the independent clause with a comma; however, do not use a comma if the dependent clause follows the independent clause. Four ways to correct Run-ons 1. Place a period between the two independent clauses. Scott is very good at Math. His brother is hopeless. 2. Place a semicolon between the two independent clauses. Scott is very good at Math; his brother is hopeless. 3. Use a comma and a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so) Scott is very good at Math, and his brother is hopeless. Scott is very good at Math, but his brother is hopeless. 4. Create a complex sentence by adding a subordinate conjunction at the beginning of one of the independent clauses and joining the two independent clauses. While Scott is very good at Math, his brother is hopeless. Contd…
  9. 9. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic Student: Jordan, did you understand how to fix run-on sentences? Student: yes Tutor: Let’s now work on a practice exercise. Tutor: Try correcting the sentences using the clues provided in the parentheses. Student: Sure. Tutor: Good start! Please go ahead. Tutor: Jordan, look at the uses of different coordinating conjunctions. Why did they listen eagerly? As the second clause is introducing the reason, you need to use ___ Tutor: Good! Tutor: Jordan, when use join two independent clauses using a coordinating conjunction, use a comma before the conjunction. Student: ok. Tutor: In this session, we learned what run-ons are and how to fix them. Student: Yes Tutor: In the next session, let’s learn about specific kind of run-on (comma splice). Student: Sure. thanks for your help. Tutor: It was nice working with you. Please feel free to take more sessions. Student: I will. bye  Correct Run-on sentences 1. Roller coasters make me dizzy I don’t enjoy them. (use a semicolon) Roller coasters make me dizzy; I don’t enjoy them. 2. We listened eagerly he brought news of Patrick. (use a comma and a coordinating conjunction) We listened eagerly, and he brought news of Patrick. and – joins two similar ideas together but – joins two contrasting ideas or – joins two alternative ideas. so – shows that the second idea is the result of the first. nor – joins two negative alternatives for – to introduce the reason for the preceding clause yet – meaning ‘but’ to We listened eagerly, for he brought news of Patrick. 3. I stayed up so late I’m sleepy this morning (use subordinating conjunction) Because I stayed up so late, I’m sleepy this morning. 4. The spacecraft landed on Mars a special camera took pictures of rocks. (use a coordinating conjunction. The spacecraft landed on Mars and a special camera took pictures of rocks.
  10. 10. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic 1. Subject Verb Agreement 2. Pronoun Antecedent Agreement 3. Fragments and Run-ons 4. Misplaced & Dangling Modifiers 5. Faulty Parallelism 6. Unnecessary shift in tense Choose the correct answer. 1. The two policemen at the construction site (look, looks) bored. 2. Neither of the two best single players, Joel and (he, him) lost a single set. 3. Tony (worked, had worked) as a lifeguard before he began his book. 4. Many people believe EVs are (good, better, best ) than conventional automobiles. The two policemen at the construction site look?? prep obj of prep A verb must agree with the subject of the sentence, not with the object of the preposition. Ok. Got it. Contd… Student: Hey, I would like to review 9th grade English. Student: can you give me some worksheet prombles on grammar. Tutor: Sure. Please take a look at the list of the topics on the board. Tutor: Which topic would you like to discuss today? Tutor: Ok. Let me give you a small exercise to identify your areas of improvement. Student: ok. i’ve done it. Tutor: Good job, Jordan! I see that you need help with Agreement rules and Tense usage. Let’s begin with subject verb agreement. Student: ok Tutor: Let’s consider the first sentence. Who is the sentence talking about? Student: two policemen?? Tutor: Good. Is “policemen” singular or plural? Student: plural Tutor: yes. Therefore it should take the plural verb.
  11. 11. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic Jordan _____ (has/have) been studying the solar system. 1.Singular subjects followed by words and phrases such as in addition to, as along with, as well as, together with, or with require singular verb. Your theory, as well as his ideas, ____ (lack, lacks) support 2.Compound subjects joined by and usually take a plural verb. (An exception is a compound subject that names one person, thing, or idea.) Fishing tackle and a life jacket ___ (was, were) stowed in the boat. Macaroni and cheese ____ (is, are) an easy dish to make. 3.Singular subject joined by or or nor take a singular verb. If one subject is singular and the other is plural, the verb should agree with the nearer subject.. Salad or dessert _____ (is, are) included with the dinner. Neither onions nor pepper ____ (improve, improves) the taste of this meatloaf. Contd… Tutor: What is the subject of the sentence? Is it singular or plural? Let’s take a look at another example. Student: Ok Tutor: To find the subject of the sentence, ask ‘Who or What?’ Student: Jordan– singular. Tutor: Good job. Can you choose the singular verb? Tutor: Great going! Now, let’s look at some special situation. Student: k k Tutor: There are two basic rules of subject verb agreement: A singular subject must have a singular verb, and a plural subject must have a plural verb. Student: lack? theory I gues and it’s singular. Tutor: Exactly! A phrase or clause that comes between a subject and its verb does not affect the subject-verb agreement. ‘Theory’ is the subject of the sentence, and it is singular. So, it should take the singular verb ‘lacks.’ Tutor: verb + s = singular. Is that clear to you? Student: oh ok Tutor: When the parts of the compound subject equal one thing, it requires a singular verb. Macaroni and cheese – one dish. Student: is?? Tutor: Yes, you got it right. Can you underline both the subjects? Excellent! Now, look at the subject that is closest to the verb. Is it singular or plural? Student: pepper – singular.
  12. 12. When Student Doesn’t Share a Specific Topic 4. If a subject comes after the verb, you must still make sure the subject and verb agree in number. There ______ (is, are) a model of the solar system on the table. The noun “solar system” follows the preposition “of.” The words after a preposition are said to be the 'object of the preposition'. A model of the solar system ______ on the table. Good job! is Tutor: Let’s look at the next rule. Tutor: Jordan, have you heard of inverted subject? Student: yes. it comes after the verb, right? Tutor: Excellent! The words here and there at the beginning of a sentence often signal an inverted sentence. Student: Ok. Tutor: Can you underline the subject in the given sentence? Tutor: Are you sure? Student: yeah I remember now . model? Tutor: yes. To make it more clear, let me rewrite the sentence. Student: I got it now. Tutor: Good! Shall we work on the next rule? Student: I would like to, but something came up and I have to leave. Tutor: It’s ok. Let’s discuss the other rules in the next session. Tutor: It was pleasure working with you. Please feel free to take more sessions. Student: same here. Thanks for your time. c u soon. Tutor: Bye
  13. 13. When Student Specifies The Topic Specific Topic Check Prior Knowledge Explain the concept Share examples Confirm Understanding Summary  Very rarely, students specify the topic (subject-verb agreement / misplaced modifiers / comma usage/ verbals) or share the worksheets /exercises, in which they need help.  When a student specifies the topic  Check his/her prior knowledge on the topic.  Begin with an example and then explain the concept.  Use show-share-see method to help student understand the concept.  Share an exercise to confirm student’s understanding.  Encourage student to provide a summary of the session.
  14. 14. When Student Specifies The Topic Tutor: Hello Adam Tutor: I am Ms. Martha, your English tutor for the day. Student: Hello. I need help with adjectives. Tutor: Okay. Please take a look at the sentences on the board. Student: What should I do? Tutor: Underline the correct adjectives. Student: ok Tutor: Adjectives describe or modify nouns or pronouns. Student: ok. the words in the brackets are adjectives? Tutor: Yes. Choose the one that best fits the blank. Tutor: first one is wrong. Student: more?? Tutor: yes. Tutor: Please complete all the sentences. Tutor: use the comparative form to compare two persons, places, or things. Student: I’m a ESL student and this is too difficult for me. Student: __END__SESSION__
  15. 15. When Student Specifies The Topic Underline the nouns (names of person, place, animal, thing, or idea) in each sentence. There can be more than one noun in each sentence. 1. Laura is a successful writer. 2. I went back to visit my old school. 3. Jessie owns three houses in Florida. Now, to identify adjectives in the given sentences, ask the following questions: What kind? Which one? How many? What kind of writer? Which school? How many houses? What kind? Adam is a good student. Which word in the sentence does it modify? student It is placed before the noun it modifies. Did you get it? Yes Tutor: Hello Adam ! I am Ms. Martha, your English tutor for the day. Student: Hi Martha Tutor: How may I help you? Student: I need help with adjectives. Tutor: May I know which grade you are in? Student: I am an ESL student. Tutor: Ok. Do you have any idea on adjectives? Student: describing words Tutor: Good! Which words do they describe? Student: nouns Tutor: Exactly! They modify nouns and pronouns. Tutor: To identify an adjective in a sentence, you should first identify the noun. Please take a look at the sentences on the board. Student: Ok. Tutor: Good try, Adam! There is one more noun in the first sentence. Can you identify it? Student: writer?? Tutor: Good. Student: I didn’t know that it is so simple. thank you Tutor: You’re welcome. Let’s now learn more interesting facts about adjectives. Tutor: Adjectives usually come right before the word they modify. Can you underline the adjective in that sentence? Contd…
  16. 16. When Student Specifies The Topic The animals are hungry. subject adjective When an adjective comes after a linking verb, it is called as predicate adjective. Is that clear to you? yes The cheeseburger smells delicious. subject adjective Underline the adjective and circle the word it modifies. 1. Above the table hung an arresting picture. 2. Jerry’s Chicken Kiev was spectacular. 3. The child on the seesaw looked ecstatically happy.. 4. The flowers smelled good. adverb Tutor: An adjective can also come after a linking verb (am, is, was, are, were) and describe the subject of the sentence. Other linking verbs include appear, become, feel, grow, look, remain, seem, sound, smell, stay, taste. Student: what is subject Tutor: The part of the sentence that tells what the sentence is about. Please look at the example on the whiteboard. What/Who is the sentence talking about? Student: animals Tutor: Good! The word ‘hungry modifies the subject ‘animals,’ and it comes after the linking verb ‘are.’ Tutor: Let me give you another example. Tutor: Well done! Tutor: Let’s work on a small exercise before we discuss the three forms of adjectives. Student: Ok. Student: third one is confusing. Tutor: Not to worry. First, identify the subject of the sentence. Student: seesaw Tutor: Who looked ecstatically happy? The child or the seesaw? Student: oh my bad! it’s child. Tutor: Good! How did the child look? Student: happy Tutor: Excellent! The word ‘happy’ tells more about the noun ‘child.’ So it is an adjective. Student: Got it  Contd…
  17. 17. When Student Specifies The Topic Tutor: Let’s now look at three degrees, or forms of adjectives. Student: Ok. Tutor: Adam, are you aware of the three degrees of comparisons? Student: positive, compartive, suprlative. Tutor: Good! Adam, please underline the adjectives in those sentences. Tutor: Fantastic! The positive degree describes a noun or a pronoun without comparing it to anyone or anything else. Student: Ok Tutor: Comparative degree is used to compare two persons, places, or things. Which two persons are compared in the second sentence? Student: Jane and Rosie. Tutor: Great job! Superlative degree is used to compare three or more persons, places, or things. Compared to all the girls in the class, Jane is beautiful. Student: ok, I got it. Tutor: Adam, in the chart, did you notice the three different ways the words change form: -er and –est, more and most, & with entirely different words. Student: Yes. Tutor: Let me explain how the number of syllables in a word determines its degree form. Student: g2g Tutor: Ok. It was pleasure working with you. Please feel free to take more sessions. We will continue this topic in the next session. Student: Sure. It was fun working with you. Bye
  18. 18. When Student Shares a Worksheet or Specific Assignment When student shares a specific assignment / exercise, ensure that you • Do not provide direct answers. • Use show-share-see method to help student arrive at his/her own answer. • Guide the student if he/she goes wrong. • Confirm student’s understanding if he/she comes up with the correct answer. • Allow the student to participate in the session. • Encourage the student to take another session if you are not able to complete the entire exercise. Specific Worksheet / Exercise Worksheet/ Assignment Share an Example Confirm Understanding Next Question Student will learn & apply the concept Ask him to choose the answer Explain the concept Wrong Option Use show-share-see method Correct Option Correct Answer Share an Example
  19. 19. When Student Shares a Worksheet or Specific Assignment Tutor: Hello.Welcome. How can I help you today? Student: hello. Student: Can I please give you the directions for my assignment? Tutor: yes. Student: Each sentence contains one gerund phrase. Identify the gerund phrase and its use. Here are the choices for its uses: Subject, Direct object, Subject Complement or Object of the Preposition. Student: here’s the first one. Tutor: Ok Student: I have always enjoyed reading books on technical subjects. Gerund phrase: enjoyed reading books. Tutor: good Student: thanks and its use is.. Subject complement Tutor: no. direct object Student: ok great. the next one: After the fire is extinguished, salvaging property becomes the main focus of the firefighters. Student: gerund phrase: salvaging property Tutor: what is your choice? Student: object of preposition is my choice Tutor: no. Student: sorry I am lost on this one. I don’t understand how salvaging property is used as a S, DO, SC, or OP Tutor: which is subject in this sentence? Contd…
  20. 20. When Student Shares a Worksheet or Specific Assignment Student: so it is used as the subject then? Tutor: let us get it together. First tell me what is the subject in the sentence. Student: fire Tutor: no Student: I’m not sure please explain this one. Tutor: I think it’s the subject of the sentence. Student: okay. next one Student: I would not know so much about technology without reading all those articles in the library. Student: Gerund phrase: reading all those articles Tutor: what is your choice? Student: object of preposition Tutor: good job. Student: thanks. Next one: Tutor: The session is coming to an end. Please book another session. Student: I have 9 more quizzes to take by Sunday  Tutor: no issues Tutor: Bye Student: talk to you tomorrow
  21. 21. When Student Shares a Worksheet or Specific Assignment Tutor: Hi Sara. Welcome to TutorVista. Student: hello. Nice to meet you Jane. Tutor: I’m Ms. Jane, your English tutor for the day. Tutor: Nice to meet you too. How may I help you? Student: Can I please give you the directions for my assignment? Tutor: yes. Please paste it on the board. Tutor: Ok. It’s an interesting topic. Student: yeah, but I’m having a tough time with it. Tutor: Not to worry. Let’s work together. Student: ok. Here’s the first one. Tutor: Sara, before we work on the exercise, let’s see what gerund phrase, subject, object, subject complement, and obj of prep are. Student: ok. they are action verbs ending in “ing” Tutor: Excellent! A gerund phrase is a gerund with modifiers or a complement. Can you underline the gerund and gerund phrase in those sentences? Tutor: Good! Direct objects can be identified by asking “Whom” or “What?” Student: Ok. Tutor: What must a successful firefighter enjoy? What is the sentence talking about? Student: hobby Contd…
  22. 22. When Student Shares a Worksheet or Specific Assignment Tutor: Is that clear to you, Sara? Student: yes. Tutor: Now, please share your sentences on the whiteboard. Let’s work on them one by one. Student: Ok. Here’s the first one. Gerund phrase: reading books and its use is Tutor: Sara, A gerund phrase will begin with a gerund, an ing word, and will include other modifiers and/or objects. Student: I got it now, it is Subject complement. Tutor: Does the phrase follow a linking verb (am, is, are, was, were)? Student: no. Tutor: Is that clear you? Student: yes. the next one. gerund phrase: salvaging property Tutor: Excellent job! Student: object of preposition is my choice Tutor: Let me explain. Student: interesting…next one: Tutor: which is subject in this sentence? You’re doing a great job, Sara. Student: Thank you. 9 more quizzes to take by Sunday Tutor: Not to worry. Let’s work on them in the next session. Please feel free to book as many sessions as possible to get complete help. Student: thank you. I will.
  23. 23. Points To Remember In Grammar sessions, ensure that you  Determine the student’s requirement .  Ask open-ended questions or provide a small exercise (2 or 3 sentences) to find out what the student already knows about the topic.  Explain the concept and use Show-Share-See method to guide the student.  Encourage the student’s participation rather than providing direct answers.  Help student understand why his/her answer is right or wrong.  Provide practice test to confirm his/her understanding.  Encourage the student to book more sessions with you for complete guidance.  Utilize the whiteboard for definitions, explanation, and examples; and chat box for greeting and other conversations. If you get the same student on a regular basis,  Identify his/her areas of improvement and guide him in those areas.  Focus on one topic in each session rather than covering too many topics in the same session.  Summarize what is covered in the session and provide a gist of what you will cover in the next session.  Provide some worksheets and ask the student to work on his/her own and share the answers in the next session.
  24. 24. List of Grammar Topics 1. Parts of Speech 2. Parts of Sentence • Subject (Simple & Complete) • Predicate (Simple & Complete) • Complement  Subject Complement – Predicate Nominative & Predicate Adjective Object Complement – Direct Object, Indirect Object, & Object Complement 3. Phrase – Gerund, Infinitive, Participial, Prepositional, Appositive 4. Clauses and Types of Clauses 5. Types of Sentences – Simple, Compound, Complex, Compound-Complex 6. Modifiers – Misplaced and Dangling 7. Parallel Structure 8. Verb Tense 9. Pronoun Usage 10. Agreement – Subject-Verb and Pronoun-Antecedent 11. Capitalization 12. Punctuation 13. Varying Sentence Beginning
  25. 25. Thank You

Hinweis der Redaktion

  • In this training session, you will learn how to deal with different types of students who come for grammar help.
  • In most of the grammar sessions, students usually do not share a specific topic; they just ask you to guide them in improving their grammar skills. Whereas, in some sessions, students ask help with a specific topic or share questions from homework and assignment. Whatever the scenario is, ensure that you follow these steps: 1) check the student’s prior knowledge on the topic to find out what kind of help he/she needs. 2 ) Then share an example and explain the concept, rather than beginning the discussion directly with the definition. 3) Provide more examples to make the concept clear to the student. 4) After explaining the concept, administer a practice test to check student’s understanding. 5) Finally, provide a short summary of the session or encourage the student to summarize the session. Following this process will involve the student in the learning process and allow him/her to actively participate in the session.
  • Since you cannot improve student’s grammar skills in one day or cover all the grammar topics in one session, determine the student’s needs to
    Identify the areas of improvement of the student.
    Identify what kind of help he/she needs.
    Identify what kind of exercise will benefit him/her the most.
    Identify the focus of the session.
  • The drawbacks of this session is listed in the next slide.
  • The drawbacks of this session is listed in the next slide.
  • Tutor determines the student’s needs by providing a list of topics and asking him to choose one.
    Shares an example, checks student prior knowledge (if he is aware of independent clauses), and then provides definition.
  • Tutor determines the student’s needs by providing a list of topics and asking him to choose one.
    Shares an example, checks student prior knowledge (if he is aware of independent clauses), and then provides definition.
  • Tutor determines the student’s needs by providing a list of topics and asking him to choose one.
    Shares an example, checks student prior knowledge (if he is aware of independent clauses), and then provides definition.
  • Determines the student’s requirement.
    As the student doesn’t know what kind of help he needs, provides a pretest to identify his weak areas.
    Poses questions and provides explanation to help student understand why his answer is wrong.
  • Explains the rules of subject verb agreement and shares examples to make the concept clear.
    Encourages the student’s participation and offers explanation as necessary.
  • Offers explanation and asks questions to help the student understand the concept.
    Ends with a personal comment and encourages student to take more sessions.
  • Adam ended the session abruptly as the tutor
    didn’t determine what kind of help he needs with adjectives.
    just provided an exercise that didn’t meet his needs.
    didn’t help the student understand why his answers are wrong.
    failed to involve the student in the session.
  • This session is productive as the tutor
    Checks student’s prior knowledge on the topic
    Begins with an example.
    Explains the concept.
    Uses show-share-see method.
  • Shares more examples and involves the student in the session.
    Provides practice exercise to confirm student’s understanding before moving on to another level of the topic.
    Uses open-ended questions and further explanation to help the student why it’s wrong.
  • Shares examples to make the differences clear to the student.
    Poses open-ended questions to allow student participate in the session.
    Encourages the student to return to TutorVista and ends with a personal note.
  • When a student looks for homework or assignment help,
    Pose open-ended questions to figure out what exactly the student is working on.
    Find out what the student already knows about the concept, rather than directly working on the exercise.
    Use show-share-see model to guide the student arrive at his/her own answers.
    Provide explanation wherever necessary to help the student understand why an answer is right or wrong.
    Check the student’s understanding before moving on to the next question.
    Encourage student to book more sessions to get complete guidance.
  • This session is not productive because the tutor
    Didn’t check the prior knowledge of the student (whether student is aware of gerund phrase, subject, direct object, etc.)
    Didn’t explain the concept when the student chose wrong option.
    Provided direct answers rather than making the student understand the concept.
    Was not sure about the topic and guessing the answer.
    Failed to correct the student when she didn’t highlight the complete gerund phrase (reading all those articles in the library)
    Neither ended with a positive note nor tried to reduce her anxiety
  • This session is not productive because the tutor
    Didn’t check the prior knowledge of the student (whether student is aware of gerund phrase, subject, direct object, etc.)
    Didn’t explain the concept when the student chose wrong option.
    Provided direct answers rather than making the student understand the concept.
    Was not sure about the topic and guessing the answer.
    Failed to correct the student when she didn’t highlight the complete gerund phrase (reading all those articles in the library)
    Neither ended with a positive note nor tried to reduce her anxiety
  • Determine the needs of the student.
    Checks the student’s prior knowledge (gerund).
    Helps student understand the concept (Subj, DO, SC, OP) before working on the exercise.
    Shares examples to help student learn the concept and apply it in her work.
    Poses open-ended questions to stimulate student’s thinking and answer on her own.
  • Improves the student’s understanding of gerund phrases and their uses.
    Encourages the student’s participation and offers explanations as necessary.
    Ensures that the student has a better understanding of the concept discussed in the session.
    Reduces the student’s anxiety by asking her to book more sessions to get more assistance.

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