RAJESH MOHESS ,CLT.
 The hemocytometer is a specimen slide which is 
used to determine the concentration of cells in a 
liquid sample. 
 It ...
 Given the known parameters it is possible to count 
the number of cells or particles in a specific 
volume of fluid, and...
 The cover glass, which is placed on the sample, does 
not simply float on the liquid, but is held in place at a 
specifi...
 The fluid containing the cells must be 
appropriately prepared before applying it to the 
hemocytometer. 
Proper mixing:...
Appropriate concentration: 
 The concentration of the cells should neither be too high or 
too low. 
 If the concentrati...
Counting cells that are on a line: 
 Cells that are on the line of a grid require 
special attention. 
 Cells that touch...
Number of squares to count: 
 The lower the concentration, the more squares 
should be counted. 
 Otherwise one introduc...
 When a liquid sample containing immobilized cells is placed 
on the chamber, it is covered with a cover glass, and capil...
 Rulings cover 9 square millimeters. 
 Boundary lines of the Neubauer ruling are the center lines of 
the groups of thre...
 The central square millimeter is ruled into 25 groups of 16 
small squares 
 The ruled surface is 0.10mm below the cove...
 Depth: 0.1 mm
 Red square = 1 x 1 mm = 1 mm2 (AREA) = 0.1 cubic millimeter 
(VOLUME - mm3) 
 Green square = 0.25 x 0.25 mm = 0.0625 mm...
 Yellow square = 0.2 x 0.2 mm = 0.04 mm2 = 0.004 mm3 
 Blue square = 0.05 x 0.05 mm = 0.0025 mm2 = 0.00025 mm3
 There are different types of counting chambers 
available, with different grid sizes. 
 Know the grid size and height (...
 Moving cells (such as sperm cells) are difficult 
to count. 
 These cells must first be immobilized. 
 The hemocytomet...
 The Unopette system is a system of prefilled 
blood dilution vials containing solutions that 
will preserve certain cell...
 The Unopette test system consists of a self-filling 
capillary pipette 
 It consists of a straight, thin-wall, uniform-...
 The reservoir is punctured to open access to 
the reagent 
 The dilution is determined by the type of 
capillary used s...
 Unopette System discontinued 
 The BMP LeukoChek is used to measure and dilute whole 
blood for manual counting of leuk...
 For this procedure, whole blood is added to 
ammonium oxalate (diluent), which lyses the 
red cells while preserving pla...
PRINCIPLE 
 Whole blood is added to the diluent, which lyses red cells but 
preserves platelets, leukocytes 
 When eryth...
 BMP LeukoChek containing ammonium oxalate 
Check expiration dates and do not use expired test kits. 
Protect from sunlig...
DILUTION RATIO 
 Sample to total volume.......................1:100 
 That is 1.98 ml of diluent to 20μl of sample
 1. Specimen should be well mixed and left on a 
rocker for at least 5 minutes before using. 
 2. Check BMP LeukoChek fo...
 3. With the reservoir on a flat surface, puncture the diaphragm of the 
reservoir using the protective shield of the cap...
 C. Wipe the excess blood from the outside of the capillary pipette. 
Be careful not to touch the tip of the capillary wh...
 G. Rinse the capillary pipette with the diluents by squeezing the 
reservoir gently two or three times. 
This forces dil...
 4. Charge hemocytometer 
 A. Mix the dilution by inversion and convert the BMP LeukoChek to 
the dropper assembly. 
 
...
 5. Place the hemocytometer in the pre-moistened Petri 
dish and leave for 15 minutes. 
This allows the sample to settle ...
 A WBC count is performed with a Neubauer 
hemocytometer. 
 Using the X10 microscope magnification, count WBC 
using the...
 When counting, the cells that touch the extreme lower and the 
extreme left lines are included in the count. 
Those on t...
 Use the following formulas to calculate the WBC. 
 Cells/mm3 = Average No. of cells + 10% X depth 
factor (10) X diluti...
 Example: If have 36 cells on one side and 44 cells 
on the other side 
Average = 80/2 = 40 cells + 10% (=4) 
= 44 cells ...
Normal Value: 
 Adult: 4,000 – 10,000 
 Newborn: 10,000 – 30,000
 Platelet counts are performed with a Neubauer 
hemocytometer 
 Counting is done using x40 dry phase contrast 
objective...
 Count the 25 squares in the middle of the counting chamber 
No. of platelets/mm3 = 
Multiply No. of platelets (+ 10%) X ...
 Example: If have 36 cells on one side in 5 squares and 
44 cells on the other side in 5 squares 
Average = 80/2 = 40 cel...
 Normal Value: 
Platelets: 150,000 to 400,000 mm3
LIMITATIONS 
 1. Specimen should be properly mixed and have sufficient 
volume of blood so there is no dilution of antico...
LIMITATIONS 
 6. Clumped platelets cannot be counted properly; the specimen must 
be recollected. 
The anticoagulant of c...
 Infections – most common is bacterial infections 
It also occur in viral (lymphocytosis) 
 Allergy and drug hypersensit...
 Viral infections – eg. HIV 
 Medications – abx, diuretics 
 Chemotherapy/Radiation therapy 
 Hyperthyroidism 
 Malig...
 Acute blood loss/Hemolytic Anemia 
 Malignancy 
 Splenomegaly 
 Inflammatory conditions – RA, IBS, Celia 
disease, Co...
 Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) 
 Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) 
 Hemolytic uremic syndrome – he...
THE END
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)
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Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)

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Hemocytometer manual cell counting (1)

  1. 1. RAJESH MOHESS ,CLT.
  2. 2.  The hemocytometer is a specimen slide which is used to determine the concentration of cells in a liquid sample.  It has a rectangular indentation that that creates a chamber  The device is carefully crafted so that the area bounded by the lines is known, and the depth of the chamber is also known.
  3. 3.  Given the known parameters it is possible to count the number of cells or particles in a specific volume of fluid, and thereby calculate the concentration of cells in the fluid overall  The hemocytometer is frequently used to determine the concentration of blood cells (hence the name “hemo-”)  However, it can also be used for other samples, such as sperm cells.
  4. 4.  The cover glass, which is placed on the sample, does not simply float on the liquid, but is held in place at a specified height (usually 0.1mm).  Additionally, a grid is etched into the glass of the hemocytometer.  This grid, an arrangement of squares of different sizes, allows for an easy counting of cells.  This way it is possible to determine the number of cells in a specified volume.
  5. 5.  The fluid containing the cells must be appropriately prepared before applying it to the hemocytometer. Proper mixing: The fluid should be a homogenous suspension. Cells that stick together in clumps are difficult to count and they are usually not evenly distributed.
  6. 6. Appropriate concentration:  The concentration of the cells should neither be too high or too low.  If the concentration is too high, then the cells overlap and are difficult to count.  A low concentration of only a few cells per square results in a higher statistical error and it is then necessary to count more squares (which takes time).  Suspensions that have a too high concentration should be diluted 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1000.  A 1:10 dilution can be made by taking 1 part of the sample and mixing it with 9 parts normal saline  The dilution must later be considered when calculating the final concentration.
  7. 7. Counting cells that are on a line:  Cells that are on the line of a grid require special attention.  Cells that touch the top and right lines of a square should not be counted  Cells on the bottom and left side should be counted.
  8. 8. Number of squares to count:  The lower the concentration, the more squares should be counted.  Otherwise one introduces statistical errors.  Cells should be counted on both sides of the chamber.  If the final result is very different, then this can be an indication of sampling error.
  9. 9.  When a liquid sample containing immobilized cells is placed on the chamber, it is covered with a cover glass, and capillary action completely fills the chamber with the sample.  Looking at the chamber through a microscope, the number of cells in the chamber can be determined by counting.  Different kinds of cells can be counted separately as long as they are visually distinguishable.  The concentration of the cells can be calculated from the cells counted from the mixture using simple formulas
  10. 10.  Rulings cover 9 square millimeters.  Boundary lines of the Neubauer ruling are the center lines of the groups of three
  11. 11.  The central square millimeter is ruled into 25 groups of 16 small squares  The ruled surface is 0.10mm below the cover glass  One (1) Milliliter = 1000 cubic millimeters (cu mm)  One (1) Microliter (ul) = One (1) cubic millimeter (cu mm)  The number of cells per cubic millimeter = Number of cells counted per square millimeter X dilution (eg. 100 for WBC count) X 10 (depth factor)
  12. 12.  Depth: 0.1 mm
  13. 13.  Red square = 1 x 1 mm = 1 mm2 (AREA) = 0.1 cubic millimeter (VOLUME - mm3)  Green square = 0.25 x 0.25 mm = 0.0625 mm2 = 0.00625 mm3
  14. 14.  Yellow square = 0.2 x 0.2 mm = 0.04 mm2 = 0.004 mm3  Blue square = 0.05 x 0.05 mm = 0.0025 mm2 = 0.00025 mm3
  15. 15.  There are different types of counting chambers available, with different grid sizes.  Know the grid size and height (read the instruction manual) otherwise you’ll make calculation errors.  The provided cover-glasses are thicker than the standard 0.15mm cover glasses.  They are therefore less flexible and the surface tension of the fluid will not deform them.  This way the height of the fluid is standardized.
  16. 16.  Moving cells (such as sperm cells) are difficult to count.  These cells must first be immobilized.  The hemocytometer is much thicker than a regular slide.  Be careful that you do not crash the objective into the hemocytometer when focusing
  17. 17.  The Unopette system is a system of prefilled blood dilution vials containing solutions that will preserve certain cell types while lysing others.  It utilizes a premeasured volume of diluent in a chamber into which a specified amount of blood is drawn
  18. 18.  The Unopette test system consists of a self-filling capillary pipette  It consists of a straight, thin-wall, uniform-bore plastic capillary tube fitted into a plastic holder  Also has a plastic reservoir containing a premeasured volume of reagent for diluting
  19. 19.  The reservoir is punctured to open access to the reagent  The dilution is determined by the type of capillary used since each type have different volumes  The diluted blood is added to a hemocytometer chamber and cells are counted in a specified area.
  20. 20.  Unopette System discontinued  The BMP LeukoChek is used to measure and dilute whole blood for manual counting of leukocytes (WBC) and platelets  It replaces the Unopette system  Tested to CLIA guidelines  Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) – establish quality standards for all laboratory testing to ensure the accuracy, reliability and timeliness of patient test results regardless of where the test was performed
  21. 21.  For this procedure, whole blood is added to ammonium oxalate (diluent), which lyses the red cells while preserving platelets, leukocytes
  22. 22. PRINCIPLE  Whole blood is added to the diluent, which lyses red cells but preserves platelets, leukocytes  When erythrocytes are completely lysed, the solution will be clear red and counting can proceed.  The diluted blood is placed in a hemocytometer according to accepted technique.  Cells are allowed to settle for 10-15 minutes before leukocytes and platelets are counted.  Under 100X magnification (x10 objective) using bright-light microscopy, leukocytes appear refractile (can be seen as dark dots)  Under 400X magnification (x40 objective) using bright-light microscopy, platelets appear oval or round and frequently have one or more dendritic processes.
  23. 23.  BMP LeukoChek containing ammonium oxalate Check expiration dates and do not use expired test kits. Protect from sunlight.  BMP LeukoChek capillary pipette, 20 μL.  Hemocytometer : improved Neubauer ruling  Hemocytometer coverslips  Petri dish lined with filter paper that has been moistened and two applicator sticks to hold the hemocytometer  Microscope  Hand counter  EDTA whole blood
  24. 24. DILUTION RATIO  Sample to total volume.......................1:100  That is 1.98 ml of diluent to 20μl of sample
  25. 25.  1. Specimen should be well mixed and left on a rocker for at least 5 minutes before using.  2. Check BMP LeukoChek for clarity and contents. If the BMP LeukoChek chambers appear cloudy or the amount of reagent looks questionable, do not use.
  26. 26.  3. With the reservoir on a flat surface, puncture the diaphragm of the reservoir using the protective shield of the capillary pipette.  A. Using a twist action, remove protective shield from the pipette assembly.  B. Holding the pipette and the tube of blood almost horizontally, touch the tip of the pipette to the blood (fill with 20μl of blood).  The pipette will fill by capillary action and will stop automatically when the blood reaches the end of the capillary bore in the neck of the pipette.
  27. 27.  C. Wipe the excess blood from the outside of the capillary pipette. Be careful not to touch the tip of the capillary when wiping off excess blood.  D. Before entering the reservoir, it is necessary to force some air out of the reservoir by squeezing it. Do not expel any liquid and maintain pressure on reservoir.  E. Place an index finger over opening of overflow chamber and position pipette into reservoir neck.   F. Release pressure on reservoir and then remove finger. The negative pressure will draw blood into pipette.
  28. 28.  G. Rinse the capillary pipette with the diluents by squeezing the reservoir gently two or three times. This forces diluent up into, but not out of, the overflow chamber and releases pressure each time to ensure the mixture returns to the reservoir.  H. Return protective shield over upper opening and gently invert several times to mix blood adequately.   I. Allow the BMP LeukoChek to stand for 10 minutes to allow RBCs to hemolyze. Leukocyte counts should be performed within 3 hours.
  29. 29.  4. Charge hemocytometer  A. Mix the dilution by inversion and convert the BMP LeukoChek to the dropper assembly.   B. Gently squeeze BMP LeukoChek and discard first 3 or 4 drops. This allows proper mixing, with no excess diluent in the tip of the capillary.  C. Carefully charge hemocytometer with the diluted blood, gently squeezing the reservoir to release contents until chamber is properly filled. Be sure to charge both sides and not to overfill chambers.
  30. 30.  5. Place the hemocytometer in the pre-moistened Petri dish and leave for 15 minutes. This allows the sample to settle evenly.  6. Cell count can now be performed
  31. 31.  A WBC count is performed with a Neubauer hemocytometer.  Using the X10 microscope magnification, count WBC using the four outer large squares on the outer sections of the counting chamber  Count both sides of the chamber and average the count.
  32. 32.  When counting, the cells that touch the extreme lower and the extreme left lines are included in the count. Those on top and right are not included. Count both sides of the chamber and average the numbers
  33. 33.  Use the following formulas to calculate the WBC.  Cells/mm3 = Average No. of cells + 10% X depth factor (10) X dilution factor (100) divided by the Area (number of squares counted)  Depth factor is multiplied by 10 to convert area to volume in μl  Area of each large square = 1mm, so for the 4 large squares = 4mm
  34. 34.  Example: If have 36 cells on one side and 44 cells on the other side Average = 80/2 = 40 cells + 10% (=4) = 44 cells  Cells/mm3 = (44 x 10 x 100)/ 4 (since 4 squares counted)  Cells/mm3 = 44,000/ 4 = 11,000  Total WBC = 11,000 mm3
  35. 35. Normal Value:  Adult: 4,000 – 10,000  Newborn: 10,000 – 30,000
  36. 36.  Platelet counts are performed with a Neubauer hemocytometer  Counting is done using x40 dry phase contrast objective. Platelets will have a faint halo.  The middle square of the hemocytometer chamber is counted.  It contains 25 small squares.
  37. 37.  Count the 25 squares in the middle of the counting chamber No. of platelets/mm3 = Multiply No. of platelets (+ 10%) X 1000 OR  Count 5 of the 25 squares  Take the average of both sides add 10%  Multiply No. of platelets x 5000 = No. of platelets/mm3
  38. 38.  Example: If have 36 cells on one side in 5 squares and 44 cells on the other side in 5 squares Average = 80/2 = 40 cells + 10% = 44  Cells/mm3 = 44 x 5000 (since 5 squares counted)  Cells/mm3 = 220,000  Total Platelets = 220,000 mm3
  39. 39.  Normal Value: Platelets: 150,000 to 400,000 mm3
  40. 40. LIMITATIONS  1. Specimen should be properly mixed and have sufficient volume of blood so there is no dilution of anticoagulant.  2. The capillary tube must be filled completely and be free of any air bubbles.  3. After the hemocytometer is charged, it should be placed in a pre-moistened Petri dish to prevent evaporation while the cells are settling out.  4. The light adjustment is critical. It is important for both WBCs and especially platelets. If the condenser is not in the correct position, it will fade out platelets.  5. Debris and bacteria can be mistaken for platelets.
  41. 41. LIMITATIONS  6. Clumped platelets cannot be counted properly; the specimen must be recollected. The anticoagulant of choice is EDTA for preventing platelet clumping.  7. Avoiding overloading of hemocytometer chamber.  8. A highly elevated leukocyte or platelet count may make accurate counting difficult. In either instance, a secondary dilution should be made. When calculating the total count, adjust the formulas to allow for secondary dilution.  9. All WBC and platelet counts are done in duplicate. WBC counts should agree +/- 15%. Platelet counts must agree +/- 25%. If they do not agree, repeat counts
  42. 42.  Infections – most common is bacterial infections It also occur in viral (lymphocytosis)  Allergy and drug hypersensitivity  Parasitic infections  Inflammation: eg. Inflammatory bowel disease, RA, and vasculitis  Extremely low birth weight  Malignancy and myeloproliferative disorders: eg. Leukemias, lymphomas  Increased release of WBC from bone marrow:- This occurs in infection, stress, and hypoxia it also occurs due to endotoxin stimulation and steroid administration
  43. 43.  Viral infections – eg. HIV  Medications – abx, diuretics  Chemotherapy/Radiation therapy  Hyperthyroidism  Malignancy  Leukemia  Lupus  Aplastic anemia
  44. 44.  Acute blood loss/Hemolytic Anemia  Malignancy  Splenomegaly  Inflammatory conditions – RA, IBS, Celia disease, Connective tissue disorder  Pancreatitis  Kidney disease
  45. 45.  Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)  Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)  Hemolytic uremic syndrome – heparin, sulfa drugs, quinidine  Bacteremia  Autoimmune diseases  Pregnancy  Trapping of platelets in the spleen  Reduced production of platelets  Increased breakdown of platelets
  46. 46. THE END

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