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Finals - General Quiz - The Capgemini K-Circle College Quiz Fest 2016

Questions from the finals of the General Quiz held at The Capgemini K-Circle College Quiz Fest 2016.

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Finals - General Quiz - The Capgemini K-Circle College Quiz Fest 2016

  1. 1. The Capgemini K-Circle College Quiz Fest 2016 The General Quiz Finals
  2. 2. Title Sponsor
  3. 3. Associate Sponsor
  4. 4. Content and Presentation Sameer Dharur.
  5. 5. Acknowledgements  Major Chandrakant Nair and Navin Rajaram for playing Siskel and Ebert to perfection.  Special thanks to M Sree Nihit, Kartik Reddy and Abhishek Bhan for general endorsement and goodwill.
  6. 6.  46 questions in all.  2 Written Rounds.  2 Infinite Pounce Rounds.  Good luck! The Deal
  7. 7. Written Round I
  8. 8. Format  8 questions.  10 points each.  Part points wherever applicable.  No bonus points for getting them all right.  Topic – Famous Meetings.
  9. 9. 1. The Washington Hilton is one of the city’s oldest and most iconic hotels, whose international ballroom is the largest along the east coast. Since 1920, this place has hosted a famous recurring event that has lately become annual with worldwide viewership. While the initial performers until WWII were singers and other big stars, the programme has assumed a lighter note since 1983 and has stayed that way ever since. What event, whose performances often acquire instant popularity?
  10. 10. 2. Established by a Hungarian-born American icon in 1917, this annual practice at the Columbia School of Journalism involves picking 120 distinguished people from around the country who are then divided into 20 groups which proceed to have confidential meetings. What do these groups do, whose work over the years has carried the criticism of having a liberal, anti-conservative bias?
  11. 11. 3. In 1932, John Rockefeller met with and commissioned a famous painter to create a color fresco in his lobby, with the theme of man being at the crossroads and looking forward to a hopeful future. However, the fresco was ordered to be demolished soon for the public outrage it generated and soon became a symbol of artistic freedom and dissent. It was eventually recreated in a neighbouring country retaining the controversial elements that had resulted in this ouster. Who was the painter? Why was the fresco demolished?
  12. 12. 4. The Rape of Lucretia is an enigmatic painting from around 500 BC that depicts the ghastly events surrounding the Roman matron, culminating in murder, for which the son of the King was held responsible. He was an unassuming acquaintance of hers and the incident inspired a rebellion that overthrew the monarchy. More than five decades ago, this painting served as a foreshadowing of a similar event, conveying repressed emotions and an eventual exhibition of unprovoked male aggression although this one was driven by the greed for money. What iconic and ghastly fictional meeting was this?
  13. 13. 5. A triple conjunction is a special celestial event where two planets or a planet and a star meet each other thrice within a short period, which leads to an unusually bright illumination in the sky. One of the better known triple junctions is between Jupiter and Saturn which is said to occur once every 900 years – and like most such events, lends itself to the fancy propositions of astrologers world over. One such famous occurrence inspired a much revered and extensively chronicled meeting that came about with the royal command to attend a ceremony. By what name has this particular instance of the celestial event come to be known? What meeting did it inspire?
  14. 14. 6. In one of the (made up) scenes of Danny Boyle’s adaptation of Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniack interrupts the back-stage preparations for the launch of the iMac and confronts Jobs about the credit he deserves for all that the company had become. The argument soon turns personal with Wozniack comparing the relationship to another famous duo who had similar issues of credit with one of them stealing the limelight among fans while the other was considered by many to be more skillful within the larger team. Which two people, part of an enormously popular group through the 60s and 70s, are being compared to Jobs and Wozniack?
  15. 15. 7. The season finale of BBC’s The Night Manger features the two protagonists – who head a money laundering empire – sitting at the Nefertiti Hotel in Cairo and chalking out their next big move that would let them reign control in the field across the Middle East. They compare themselves to two British civil servants – one a celebrated national figure serving as the Colonial Secretary to the Middle East and the other his famous protégé with a celebrated biopic, who met at an iconic conference in 1921 that sealed the future of several countries in the region. Who were these two British officers?
  16. 16. 8. In 1957, New York based real estate baron Walter O’Malley and owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers had a standoff over several meetings with the city’s mayor since he wasn’t granted the required land and had to move the team to Los Angeles, much to the dismay of the locals. A resident of Brooklyn then, aged 16, noted how big money could easily forsake popular interests and described it as a brutal act which impacted the region in a very significant way – strongly believing that the entity in question belonged more to the people than to the owners. Who was this, whose long-held beliefs were shaped in part by this move of the franchise?
  17. 17. Answers
  18. 18. 1. The Washington Hilton is one of the city’s oldest and most iconic hotels, whose international ballroom is the largest along the east coast. Since 1920, this place has hosted a famous recurring event that has lately become annual with worldwide viewership. While the initial performers until WWII were singers and other big stars, the programme has assumed a lighter note since 1983 and has stayed that way ever since. What event, whose performances often acquire instant popularity?
  19. 19. The Answer is …
  20. 20. The White House Correspondents’ Dinner.
  21. 21. 2. Established by a Hungarian-born American icon in 1917, this annual practice at the Columbia School of Journalism involves picking 120 distinguished people from around the country who are then divided into 20 groups which proceed to have confidential meetings. What do these groups do, whose work over the years has carried the criticism of having a liberal, anti-conservative bias?
  22. 22. The Answer is …
  23. 23. Adjudge the winners of the Pulitzer Prize.
  24. 24. 3. In 1932, John Rockefeller met with and commissioned a famous painter to create a color fresco in his lobby, with the theme being that of man being at the crossroads and looking forward to a hopeful future. However, the fresco was ordered to be demolished soon for the public outrage it generated and soon became a symbol of artistic freedom and dissent. It was eventually recreated in a neighbouring country retaining the controversial elements that had resulted in this ouster. Who was the painter? Why was the fresco demolished?
  25. 25. The Answer is …
  26. 26. Diego Rivera.
  27. 27. For its depiction of Lenin, that suggested communist utopia.
  28. 28. 4. The Rape of Lucretia is an enigmatic painting from around 500 BC that depicts the ghastly events surrounding the Roman matron, culminating in murder, for which the son of the King was held responsible. He was an unassuming acquaintance of hers and the incident inspired a rebellion that overthrew the monarchy. More than five decades ago, this painting served as a foreshadowing of a similar event, conveying repressed emotions and an eventual exhibition of unprovoked male aggression although this one was driven by the greed for money. What iconic and ghastly fictional meeting was this?
  29. 29. The Answer is …
  30. 30. The shower scene in Psycho.
  31. 31. 5. A triple conjunction is a special celestial event where two planets or a planet and a star meet each other thrice within a short period, which leads to an unusually bright illumination in the sky. One of the better known triple junctions is between Jupiter and Saturn which is said to occur once every 900 years – and like most such events, lends itself to the fancy propositions of astrologers world over. One such famous occurrence inspired a much revered and extensively chronicled meeting that came about with the royal command to attend a ceremony. By what name has this particular instance of the celestial event come to be known? What meeting did it inspire?
  32. 32. The Answer is …
  33. 33. The Star of Bethlehem. The 3 wise kings at Christ’s birth.
  34. 34. 6. In one of the (made up) scenes of Danny Boyle’s adaptation of Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniack interrupts the back-stage preparations for the launch of the iMac and confronts Jobs about the credit he deserves for all that the company had become. The argument soon turns personal with Wozniack comparing the relationship to another famous duo who had similar issues of credit with one of them stealing the limelight among fans while the other was considered by many to be more skillful within the larger team. Which two people, part of an enormously popular group through the 60s and 70s, are being compared to Jobs and Wozniack?
  35. 35. The Answer is …
  36. 36. John Lennon. Ringo Starr.
  37. 37. 7. The season finale of BBC’s The Night Manger features the two protagonists – who head a money laundering empire – sitting at the Nefertiti Hotel in Cairo and chalking out their next big move that would let them reign control in the field across the Middle East. They compare themselves to two British civil servants – one a celebrated national figure serving as the Colonial Secretary to the Middle East and the other his famous protégé with a celebrated biopic, who met at an iconic conference in 1921 that sealed the future of several countries in the region. Who were these two British officers?
  38. 38. The Answer is …
  39. 39. Winston Churchill. T.E. Lawrence.
  40. 40. 8. In 1957, New York based real estate baron Walter O’Malley and owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers had a standoff over several meetings with the city’s mayor since he wasn’t granted the required land and had to move the team to Los Angeles, much to the dismay of the locals. A resident of Brooklyn then, aged 16, noted how big money could easily forsake popular interests and described it as a brutal act which impacted the region in a very significant way – strongly believing that the entity in question belonged more to the people than to the owners. Who was this, whose long-held beliefs were shaped in part by this move of the franchise?
  41. 41. The Answer is …
  42. 42. Bernie Sanders.
  43. 43. Infinite Pounce I
  44. 44. Format  15 questions.  +10, -5 on the pounce.  No partial pouncing applicable.  Good luck!
  45. 45. 1. The following visuals are from a heritage building in Hyderabad constructed in the final decade of the 18th century, which remains a minor tourist attraction to this day but is used for other purposes. In the early 19th century, the activities of this place courted some controversy owing to the inter-racial affair between the British Resident at Hyderabad James Kirkpatrick and a local noblewoman Khair-un-Nissa. Kirkpatrick was eventually summoned to Calcutta by the powers-that-be and dismissed. How did this tale come into popular consciousness a decade and a half ago? How does the original name of this building, an apt local word, survive today?
  46. 46. The Answer is …
  47. 47. The building was called Koti - local word for ‘mansion’ – and lent its name to the area.
  48. 48. 2. The pupillary sphincter is a muscle in the eye that encircles the pupil of the iris and controls its adjustment in times of dim and bright light. Apart from its regular behavior – it is observed that in the final hours of one’s life, the control over this muscle is entirely lost which leads to its involuntary relaxation and the subsequent dilation of the eyes. The functioning of this muscle was a matter of particular interest to a certain duo last year, who spent hours trying to study this complex anatomical process in detail to achieve a desired effect. What were they working on?
  49. 49. The Answer is …
  50. 50. The death of Jon Snow on Game of Thrones.
  51. 51. 3. One of the earliest examples of this questionable trend comes from early Chinese culture where the Emperor always lived in a certain specific part of the country while the rest of his subjects were supposed to look up to him. The most definitive shift toward this trend came courtesy Gerardus Mercator’s landmark work in 1569 – with the aim of helping explorers, who were mostly of European origin, go about their business with maximum success and efficiency. What geographic trend, that has often been disputed over the years and also contributed to colloquial and psychological bias?
  52. 52. The Answer is …
  53. 53. Maps having North at the top.
  54. 54. 4. First developed for conventional warfare during the Cold War, these objects of strategic importance were pushed towards completion in the 1990s but abandoned in 2004 by the US Department of Defense. However, it appears that they were being designed in secret nevertheless – by modifying existing alternatives with changes like adding special coatings to the skin to absorb beams, replacing sharp edges with curved ones that scatter them in many directions and having an addition that resembles a dishpan. What objects are these? How were these features made public five years ago, owing to an unforeseen accident?
  55. 55. The Answer is …
  56. 56. Stealth choppers.
  57. 57. The crash at Bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad.
  58. 58. 5. Artisan families in states like UP and Punjab – specifically in the towns of Agra, Muzaffarnagar, Meerut, Saharanpur and Rajpura – are known to specialize in this annual business that gets them purchases in various places in North India for a few weeks. This business took a serious hit last year with prices falling by about 40% owing to the rising costs of canvas and bamboo sticks. In a normal year, a few hundred of these creations are sold at a price of about 1-2 lakh rupees each – that helps sustain the business year after year. What do these artisans produce, seen by many as wasteful usage every year?
  59. 59. The Answer is …
  60. 60. Effigies burnt at Ramleela ceremonies.
  61. 61. 6. These annual preparations involve a dedicated crew working round the clock to put together a mixture of limestone, slag and 88,000 pounds of brick residue during completely dry weather conditions for optimal effect. The thicknesses of the respective materials are strictly adhered to, the whole mixture is watered everyday, covered briefly and then treated with Calcium Chloride to maintain the required toughness and colour. A reserve of 11,000 pounds of brick is maintained to account for wear and tear that is normally expected every year. What exactly are these annual preparations, about 20 in number?
  62. 62. The Answer is …
  63. 63. The clay courts at Roland Garros.
  64. 64. 7. Recent archaeological findings conducted around the northern parts of India suggest the possibility of the region of Haryana having the earliest evidence of agriculture and sedantism, even before the Indus Valley Civilization. The region was believed to be free of the dangers of snow-fall or unexpected floods unlike most other regions and marked by a more stable manner of cultivation, with rich growth of barley and wheat, as opposed to rice in the Gangetic plains. What popular legend does this evidence claim to substantiate? What famous annual practice supposedly resulted from this particular growth of barley around the region?
  65. 65. The Answer is …
  66. 66. The Saraswati River, detailed in the Rig Veda.
  67. 67. Offering barley on the occasion of the spring festival of Sarasvati Puja on the day of Vasant Panchami.
  68. 68. 8. The Italian-American Civil Rights League was an active organization that sought to address charges of racial discrimination which were vogue in the late 1960s. One of their biggest movements took place in the initial years of their operation, staging several rallies across New York City, raising more than $500,000 for the cause and trying to arm-twist their adversary into submission. A peaceful out-of-court settlement was finally reached when the other party agreed to avoid using a controversial word that was viewed as offensive and stereotypical of the community. What famous and peculiar omission does this incident explain?
  69. 69. The Answer is …
  70. 70. The absence of ‘Mafia’ throughout The Godfather.
  71. 71. 9. Mark Sunderland, textile engineer at the University of Philadelphia, has recently come out with these outfits whose unique features will be used for the first time in a certain field. An initial layer comes with a moisture barrier and a second layer comes with an anti-microbial finish which kills micro-organisms. This invention, meant for a specific group of people, has been necessitated by the extreme pollution levels prevalent in a place that will soon attract over 1,400 people from around the world. Despite assurances of cleaning, recent samples tested in this region reveal 14 million to 1.7 billion adenoviruses per 1000 mg/ml. Which group of people is this outfit for? What filthy place will it be used at?
  72. 72. The Answer is …
  73. 73. The US Rowing Team.
  74. 74. At Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, the rowing venue for the Rio Olympics.
  75. 75. 10. One of the busiest and most rewarding professions in the world, this job’s selection process involves 3D problem solving scenarios to test one’s analytical skills – with basic prerequisites being the ability to perform numerical computations, possess an excellent short-term memory, have superior situational awareness to make several decisions in a short time, the ability to communicate in English and not carry conditions of hypertension or any mental illnesses since they are often seen to be dangerous to the job’s requirements. What profession, that exists in most important cities of the world and comes with a mandatory 30 minute break every two hours?
  76. 76. The Answer is …
  77. 77. Air Traffic Controllers.
  78. 78. 11. Recent breakthroughs around the mountain of Monte Smith on this Aegean Sea island have uncovered enormous stone foundations around this temple site that supposedly answers an age old mystery. Remains around the site from several hundreds of years ago were believed to be sold off to Arabian merchants and evaded further study – some of which, according to texts, included several iron bars, bronze plates, rivets and rings. The site’s erstwhile attraction is also said to have inspired a key design choice for an international trans-atlantic project in the 1870s. What is the subject of this historical research? What is the design choice or project being talked about?
  79. 79. The Answer is …
  80. 80. The Colossus of Rhodes.
  81. 81. The torch on the Statue of Liberty.
  82. 82. 12. IBM’s successful history in the field of accounting and data is well known. One of its largest clients in the 20th century sought assistance in business services, data collection and data tabulations – a deal that was inked in 1933. Initial calculations produced about half a million entries while the final number stood close to 2 million, each given a unique identification number instrumental to the client. Besides the punch cards used for this purpose, IBM also later oversaw the efficient and punctual functioning of the client’s transport system that had over 50 wagons in action each day for 4 straight years – about 1600 in all. Who was this client? What were these wagons transporting?
  83. 83. The Answer is …
  84. 84. The Third Reich.
  85. 85. Jews to concentration camps.
  86. 86. 13. One of China’s most bizarre economic phenomena has changed significantly over the last 50 years, with objects like thermos bottles, radios, furniture, watches and sewing machines experiencing a rise in sales at different points of time. Today, these goods have been replaced by exorbitant prices to the tune of over $30,000 in the business whose reasons have been attributed to a stark rural-urban divide and a famous government move instituted in 1978 that is being gradually phased out since last year. What business is this, whose variant has often been seen in India? What government move was largely responsible for this?
  87. 87. The Answer is …
  88. 88. The price for brides.
  89. 89. The one-child policy.
  90. 90. 14. Held in the UK about 15 times from 1608 to 1814, these unique fairs lasted for a period of a month or two. The most celebrated of them was in 1683-84 and was documented to include events of general entertainment for the public such as bull-baiting, horse and coach races, puppet plays and interludes – giving it the feel of a much needed carnival for its people. However, they often came to abrupt ends that sometimes resulted in damage to the goods used in the fairs and the animals. Owing to unfavourable circumstances, they could not be revived after the early 19th century. Where exactly were these fairs held?
  91. 91. The Answer is …
  92. 92. Across the frozen River Thames.
  93. 93. 15. Eyam is an English village located in Derbyshire that was formerly industrial but now serves only as a transit point close to Manchester. Its fame comes from events that occurred in the 17th century when the village literally brought itself to a standstill – roads were left to crumble, gardens and crops were overgrown and much of its supplies came from neighbouring towns. Boundary stones were marked and laced with vinegar for its desired effect and special cottages in the village today are honoured with green plaques for their significance through that period. What role did this village play that earned it a distinct place in history books?
  94. 94. The Answer is …
  95. 95. Quarantined itself to end the bubonic plague.
  96. 96. Written Round II
  97. 97. Format  8 questions.  10 points each.  Part points wherever applicable.  No bonus points for getting them all right.  Topic – Nomenclature.
  98. 98. 1. A recent probe launched by the Madhya Pradesh government found atleast 114 doctors who gained admission by fraud since 2009, apart from several practicing ones who could have similar lack of credentials. Suspecting complicity from government officials, it was also determined that many of these malpractices were due to imposters writing examinations with their photos on the ID cards. What appropriate nickname was this scam given in the media, a comparison to something from popular culture more than a decade ago?
  99. 99. 2. Usually referred to by the name Cis-Jordan in the Latin languages, this contested territory has had a checkered ownership history with significant changes in armistice agreements in 1949 and a defining move in 1967 whose repercussions exist to this day. What is the common geopolitical name of this place, that is a convenient relative reference to the Jordan river?
  100. 100. 3. Alec Swann is a former Northamptonshire opening batsman and now a cricket writer whose famous coinage sticks to this day. Talking about a teammate of his who joined the club in the 2001 season, Swann recalls him being a quiet introvert who was so dedicated to the game’s practice sessions he was always the first to start and the last to leave – desperate to show what he could do after failing to be picked by his country even at the age of 26. Who was this cricketer? As a result of his commitment to the game, what name did Swann and his teammates give him?
  101. 101. 4. Michael Barratt is a renowned American physician working at a unique place since the 90s. Dealing with unusually primitive equipment, his most common treatments are for back pain and vision changes. One of his foremost challenges is liquid containment, with surface tension causing blood to adhere to the surface rather than pool in. He uses a special device – a fluid filled dome placed over the operating area through which he could manipulate instruments and scalpels – all while being unable to use an inhaled anaesthetic on the patient due to the conditions that are often contaminated with all sorts of bacteria. Where does he work? What similar fictional character from a series, known to us since the 60s, is he usually compared to at work?
  102. 102. 5. Dr. Hjalmar Schacht, the Nazi Economics minister, summoned the ambassador to Germany from a certain country in 1935 and conveyed a suggestion for an image make-over, based on the country‘s people. Soon after, the head of this country was convinced about its merit and brought about the official changes needed to make it happen. While supporters of this change found it ‘noble’ and unifying, detractors claimed it damaged the cultural heritage of the country and aligned them with a pro-Nazi sentiment. What change was this? Why exactly was it viewed as pro-Nazi?
  103. 103. 6. Until the mid 19th century, European travel to India was complicated, with travelers having to journey across a narrow isthmus after crossing the Mediterranean Sea and then waiting at Aden to be collected by the next steamer bound for India. To pass time, a lavish hostel was built at Aden. However, this stopover was no longer necessary a little later and the hostel, having fallen into disuse, fetched a whopping 9,300 rupees in the Europeans’ hands. This money was then used to set up an affluent place in India that is an anglicization of the local words for ‘temple’ and ‘creek’ referring to the place’s vicinity. Why was this transit no longer necessary? What place, that maintains its elite ways till today, was thus set up?
  104. 104. 7. Mason Plumlee is a professional NBA player who currently plays for the Portland Trail Blazers. His claim to fame was his signing up on a rookie-scale contract in 2013 with the Brooklyn Nets, where his exploits surprised one and all. As a result, he was given a moniker that combined his surname with a famous blockbuster from the 2000s that also similarly dealt with an overachieving storyline. What was the nickname given to him?
  105. 105. 8. Owned by the Austrian Ministry of the Interior, this camp has opened its arms to successive waves of refugees – the Hungarians in 1956, the Czechs and the Romanians in 1968, Vietnamese boat people among others. When the Chileans fleeing Pinochet landed up in the early 1970s, they made it their home and began carrying out several productive activities in the region – and therefore decided to give it an appropriate name of a similar place in South America, introduced through an iconic 1967 work, that was shaped from nothing by Chilean refugees. What name did they give it, that has eventually stuck to the region?
  106. 106. Answers
  107. 107. 1. A recent probe launched by the Madhya Pradesh government found atleast 114 doctors who gained admission by fraud since 2009, apart from several practicing ones who could have similar lack of credentials. Suspecting complicity from government officials, it was also determined that many of these malpractices were due to imposters writing examinations with their photos on the ID cards. What appropriate nickname was this scam given in the media, a comparison to something from popular culture more than a decade ago?
  108. 108. The Answer is …
  109. 109. 2. Usually referred to by the name Cis-Jordan in the Latin languages, this contested territory has had a checkered ownership history with significant changes in armistice agreements in 1949 and a defining move in 1967 whose repercussions exist to this day. What is the common geopolitical name of this place, that is a convenient relative reference to the Jordan river?
  110. 110. The Answer is …
  111. 111. West Bank.
  112. 112. 3. Alec Swann is a former Northamptonshire opening batsman and now a cricket writer whose famous coinage sticks to this day. Talking about a teammate of his who joined the club in the 2001 season, Swann recalls him being a quiet introvert who was so dedicated to the game’s practice sessions he was always the first to start and the last to leave – desperate to show what he could do after failing to be picked by his country even at the age of 26. Who was this cricketer? As a result of his commitment to the game, what name did Swann and his teammates give him?
  113. 113. The Answer is …
  114. 114. Mike Hussey. Mr. Cricket.
  115. 115. 4. Michael Barratt is a renowned American physician working at a unique place since the 90s. Dealing with unusually primitive equipment, his most common treatments are for back pain and vision changes. One of his foremost challenges is liquid containment, with surface tension causing blood to adhere to the surface rather than pool in. He uses a special device – a fluid filled dome placed over the operating area through which he could manipulate instruments and scalpels – all while being unable to use an inhaled anaesthetic on the patient due to the conditions that are often contaminated with all sorts of bacteria. Where does he work? What similar fictional character from a series, known to us since the 60s, is he usually compared to at work?
  116. 116. The Answer is …
  117. 117. International Space Station.
  118. 118. Dr. Leonard McCoy from Star Trek.
  119. 119. 5. Dr. Hjalmar Schacht, the Nazi Economics minister, summoned the ambassador to Germany from a certain country in 1935 and conveyed a suggestion for an image make-over, based on the country‘s people. Soon after, the head of this country was convinced about its merit and brought about the official changes needed to make it happen. While supporters of this change found it ‘noble’ and unifying, detractors claimed it damaged the cultural heritage of the country and aligned them with a pro-Nazi sentiment. What change was this? Why exactly was it viewed as pro-Nazi?
  120. 120. The Answer is …
  121. 121. The renaming of Persia to Iran.
  122. 122. ‘Iran’ derives from ‘Aryan’, signifying the race of its population.
  123. 123. 6. Until the mid 19th century, European travel to India was complicated, with travelers having to journey across a narrow isthmus after crossing the Mediterranean Sea and then waiting at Aden to be collected by the next steamer bound for India. To pass time, a lavish hostel was built at Aden. However, this stopover was no longer necessary a little later and the hostel, having fallen into disuse, fetched a whopping 9,300 rupees in the Europeans’ hands. This money was then used to set up an affluent place in India that is an anglicization of the local words for ‘temple’ and ‘creek’ referring to the place’s vicinity. Why was this transit no longer necessary? What place, that maintains its elite ways till today, was thus set up?
  124. 124. The Answer is …
  125. 125. The construction of the Suez Canal.
  126. 126. The Breach Candy Club.
  127. 127. 7. Mason Plumlee is a professional NBA player who currently plays for the Portland Trail Blazers. His claim to fame was his signing up on a rookie-scale contract in 2013 with the Brooklyn Nets, where his exploits surprised one and all. As a result, he was given a moniker that combined his surname with a famous blockbuster from the 2000s that also similarly dealt with an overachieving storyline. What was the nickname given to him?
  128. 128. The Answer is …
  129. 129. 8. Owned by the Austrian Ministry of the Interior, this camp has opened its arms to successive waves of refugees – the Hungarians in 1956, the Czechs and the Romanians in 1968, Vietnamese boat people among others. When the Chileans fleeing Pinochet landed up in the early 1970s, they made it their home and began carrying out several productive activities in the region – and therefore decided to give it an appropriate name of a similar place in South America, introduced through an iconic 1967 work, that was shaped from nothing by Chilean refugees. What name did they give it, that has eventually stuck to the region?
  130. 130. The Answer is …
  131. 131. Macondo, from One Hundred Years of Solitude.
  132. 132. Infinite Pounce II
  133. 133. Format  15 questions.  +10, -5 on the pounce.  No partial pouncing applicable.  Good luck!
  134. 134. 1. Made entirely from raw material that is tanned and cured using only natural ingredients without chemicals, these objects are known for their versatility and usefulness in the hot and sweaty months of the summer – all of which have contributed to the claims of them having medicinal properties. Over the last one year, the raw materials used for them have become sharply more expensive in the prime manufacturing town – prohibiting their availability and escalating costs for both producers and consumers, which has led to the decline in livelihood of several stakeholders, apart from that of the product’s own popularity. What objects are these, known by the place of their manufacture? Why the decline recently?
  135. 135. The Answer is …
  136. 136. Kolhapuri chappals.
  137. 137. The ban on cattle slaughter in Maharashta.
  138. 138. 2. Prevalent almost throughout every country in the Middle East is the Sharia Law that prohibits consumption of alcohol – especially in public – with severe penalties of jail terms or flogging. However, recent circumstances in one of the countries has necessitated an innovative solution to this problem, with special courts that will be set up over the next few years to deal with the issue – taking inspiration from a similar move adopted in an African nation about 8 years ago. What are these circumstances that have compelled the otherwise conservative authorities to consider relaxing the stringent norms on alcoholism for their own profits?
  139. 139. The Answer is …
  140. 140. The 2022 FIFA World Cup.
  141. 141. 3. Established in Ohio in 1947, this US military department’s services soon required to be moved to Los Angeles – the city that was responsible for most of the demand. To this day, the department has had hundreds of clients who’ve sought the help of the military in their high budget activities. However, the most unfriendly such association came with a client in 1996 whose product made the highest money in its field that year. The dispute – which primarily centered around a highly classified military base – forced the department to pull out of the collaboration with its client, the only such case in its history. What does this department of the military do? Who or what was this client in 1996?
  142. 142. The Answer is …
  143. 143. The Entertainment Liaisons Office, which helps films and TV shows depicting the military.
  144. 144. Independence Day, which was hell-bent on having Area 51 figure majorly in its plot.
  145. 145. 4. As the Prohibition was drawing to a close in the 1930s, this Chicago- based kingpin needed to find an alternative way to sustain business and thus moved on to the distribution of milk instead of illicit liquor. Having already acquired a Robin-Hood-like status in the city with his largesse during the Depression, he lobbied with the Chicago City Council for a law to introduce a certain feature to his milk sales with the idea of protecting the city’s children from harm. With the lack of regulation, he conquered the market and set in place a landmark feature that soon extended to other products as well. Who was this person? What addition to the product was this, that is still seen by some to be the cause of wastage worth $165 billion every year?
  146. 146. The Answer is …
  147. 147. Al Capone.
  148. 148. Having expiry dates on products.
  149. 149. 5. Driven by the fact that concussions are a common feature in the NFL, researchers at the Toronto Western Hospital recently came up with these protective collar-bands that constrict the blood flow out of the head by applying light pressure to the veins in the neck, which retains more blood in the skull acting as a cushion against potential damage to the brain. Further research also suggested that this elaborate protective mechanism need not be gone through by teams such as the Denver Broncos and the Arizona Cardinals since their likelihood of having concussions was found to be about 30% less. What creatures, from the natural world, served as the inspiration for this mechanism? Why would these teams not require this equipment?
  150. 150. The Answer is …
  151. 151. Woodpeckers – which have bones that wrap all the way around the head, constrict blood and offer protection.
  152. 152. The stadia are located at very high altitudes – so the brain is automatically supplied more blood for oxygenation.
  153. 153. 6. Abbott Thayer was a French-turned American painter from the early 20th century. Besides his usual paintings, he also harboured an interest in nature, illustrating books on the topic written by his son. These two interests of him are juxtaposed in paintings like these where animals are his objects of observation. His biggest contribution from these interests, however, was initially dismissed by the British establishment but eventually found favour with the Americans and has been in use world over ever since. What was this contribution, that has come to define a certain group of people?
  154. 154. The Answer is …
  155. 155. The Answer is …
  156. 156. The Answer is … Camouflage uniforms used by the military.
  157. 157. 7. Gerald Bull was a Canadian space scientist who worked in the 1960s on the High Altitude Research Project (HARP) developing these instruments with the aim of firing weather probes into sub-orbit and removing multiple rocket stages for each orbit – a much cheaper alternative. Devoid of funding for a very long time, he was finally approached by a client in 1981 owing to the country’s immediate requirements and had the instrument prepared by 1988 – that could launch a 2000 kg rocket assisted projectile carrying a 200 kg satellite. However, it all came to an end a year later when he was assassinated. Who was this client, who came forward to provide funding? How did this play a part in a major geopolitical event more than two decades later?
  158. 158. The Answer is …
  159. 159. Saddam Hussein, who wanted to use it in the prevailing Iran-Iraq War.
  160. 160. Contributed to the Weapons of Mass Destruction myth and the subsequent invasion of Iraq.
  161. 161. 8. The Germanwings Flight 9525 air crash in 2015 was one of the worst aviation disasters in recent memory, that killed all 150 passengers and crew on board. The cause was attributed to the deliberate taking down of the flight by pilot Andreas Lubitz who was later ascertained to be psychologically ill. The plot was made possible by the co-pilot who had exercised some laxity on his part and couldn’t amend the situation when things got worse, owing to a security feature that has been in place for over a decade. What security feature thwarted his attempts at saving the flight? Why or when was this feature introduced in the first place?
  162. 162. The Answer is …
  163. 163. The inability to enter (in this case, re-enter) the cockpit without the pilot’s approval from the inside.
  164. 164. Introduced in the aftermath of the 9/11 hijacking.
  165. 165. 9. In 1849, while Charles Dickens was writing the ending to one of his famous works, he was inspired by Sidney’s Australian Hand-Book that helped him dispel his notions of the country as being filled with jails. The subsequent discovery of gold in Australia also improved his impression of the country. He thus featured it as a significant plot point in this unfinished work as it was suddenly seen to be a place worth going to. He was approached to make a historic visit on a lecture tour in 1862 by a company called Spiers and Pond, but couldn’t make the trip. What plot point was influenced in the 1849 work? Whom did these organizers call for the first time to the country instead of him, a visit that would gain further significance 20 years later?
  166. 166. The Answer is …
  167. 167. The emigration of the Micawber family to Australia in David Copperfield.
  168. 168. Invited the English Cricket Team for their first ever bilateral series, which got dubbed The Ashes in 1862.
  169. 169. 10. As part of its expansion strategy in the Middle East after considerable success in Asia, USA and Europe in the recent past – this company recently managed to raise a whopping $3.5bn funding from Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund. Such a heavy investment in one particular country was unprecedented in the company’s history and was met with much skepticism and online protest campaigns from a certain section of the local population who saw it as exploitative and mutually beneficial to both the company and the country’s conservative minded administration. Which company was this? What was the protest all about?
  170. 170. The Answer is …
  171. 171. Uber.
  172. 172. Women not being allowed to drive and therefore naturally becoming Uber’s customers.
  173. 173. 11. American and European societies in the Victorian era of the mid-1800s were beginning to undergo dramatic changes in fashion, with middle and upper class women taking to long, trailing skirts. However, this interest waned in the late 1800s when a certain group of people in the society raised strong objection to these outfits – inspired by the research publication of a German who came up with four defining postulates in his field, and also won the Nobel Prize in 1905. As a result, the clothing eventually grew unpopular and was shunned by the public. Who was this person? Why was he objecting to these outfits?
  174. 174. The Answer is …
  175. 175. Robert Koch.
  176. 176. Proved tuberculosis was contagious and being spread by skirts that swept germs from the streets.
  177. 177. 12. Researchers at the Geological Society of America have lately been using 3D computer modelling to study rock formations at some specific points in the country – particularly those in Pennsylvania. The rocks around Cemetery Hill, Little Round Top and Seminary Hill were found to be largely dolomites – a harder form of carbonates which, along with its embedded materials, makes it difficult to weather or erode – thereby producing landscapes with a steady height difference. How did this setting have a major influence in the area 150 years ago? What culminating historic event at the following location in the same town (second image) was possible because of this?
  178. 178. The Answer is …
  179. 179. Helped the Union defend better and win the Civil War.
  180. 180. The Gettysburg Address.
  181. 181. 13. One of the major problems of online advertising is that of credit attribution, where a shopper learns of a product via an ad based on a site while the purchase might be made based on an ad elsewhere. To study the implications of this phenomenon, Harvard Business School introduces an analogy to a major business practice from the 19th century that has now become a historical footnote – where similar problems of ownership often became the subject of much conflict among various entities, all of which had the incentive and the effort to claim a top prize that fetched in excess of $10,000 back in the day. What business practice is this? What work from the mid-19th century lays down rules for credit attribution in this practice?
  182. 182. The Answer is …
  183. 183. Whaling, where multiple ships were responsible for harpooning a given whale.
  184. 184. 14. Damian O’Brien is a senior leader in the internationally renowned HALO Trust who was given his most difficult work assignment at the turn of this decade. Having to work on all kinds of stretches of lands – that are broad swaths, part of an isthmus or sandy soils on the coast – with a target area of over 150 million square meters, the following tools have been used to simplify a difficult task that employees have all sorts of troubles carrying out, including identifying patches of land that have changed dramatically over the years, while the crackdown on international organizations lately has also stifled these efforts. In which island was this activity commissioned? What exactly is the nature of this job?
  185. 185. The Answer is …
  186. 186. Sri Lanka.
  187. 187. Defusing mines left behind by the LTTE.
  188. 188. Last Question
  189. 189. Title Sponsor
  190. 190. Associate Sponsor
  191. 191. 15. Introduced in the 1950s in response to demands of efficiency in its field, these devices today range in size from 15 to 24 inch, are equipped with custom designed hardware for best stability and come with compatibility across various operating systems. While the initial ones worked on the principle of using mirrors to achieve undetectable reflections, advancements and convenience brought about computer-based variants that have been used ever since – with many people preferring to use two of them at every instance lately, instead of just one, to achieve optimal effect and ease. What devices are being described?
  192. 192. The Answer is …
  193. 193. Teleprompters.

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Questions from the finals of the General Quiz held at The Capgemini K-Circle College Quiz Fest 2016.

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