Diese Präsentation wurde erfolgreich gemeldet.
Wir verwenden Ihre LinkedIn Profilangaben und Informationen zu Ihren Aktivitäten, um Anzeigen zu personalisieren und Ihnen relevantere Inhalte anzuzeigen. Sie können Ihre Anzeigeneinstellungen jederzeit ändern.
Page 1 of 11
LinkedIn & Career
Building for
University Students
How to use LinkedIn to find a job, plan your
career, build...
Page 2 of 11
Whether you are a first, second or third year student or graduate
studying international relations, Asian stu...
Page 3 of 11
set to put the first money into Facebook in 2004, I suggested that Mark
take half of my investment allocation...
Page 4 of 11
 Connect with your university alumni and join the alumni group on
LinkedIn. Remember your alumni starts from...
Page 5 of 11
* Your life
* Why you chose to study whatever you are studying
* Where you hope to go with your studies
* You...
Page 6 of 11
Test Scores – you can include degrees and diplomas that you
have completed and the scores you received. Again...
Page 7 of 11
To that end, LinkedIn engage 4,000+ engineers who are
continually working on improving their systems. What th...
Page 8 of 11
Examples of LinkedIn invitations –
1. Hi Mary, great to meet you at the Careers Expo on Wednesday.
All the be...
Page 9 of 11
you can press skip and proceed to the next message. There will
also be a list of people in your connections l...
Page 10 of 11
So how will you spend you LinkedIn time?
Every day Look for interesting Updates to send to your
connections ...
Page 11 of 11
Go for quality not quantity in terms of the
number of groups you join. Feel free to ask or
answer questions ...
Nächste SlideShare
Wird geladen in …5
×

2017 - LinkedIn and Career Building for University Students by Robyn Henderson -

101 Aufrufe

Veröffentlicht am

  • Als Erste(r) kommentieren

2017 - LinkedIn and Career Building for University Students by Robyn Henderson -

  1. 1. Page 1 of 11 LinkedIn & Career Building for University Students How to use LinkedIn to find a job, plan your career, build your profile and research potential employers Robyn Henderson robyn@networkingtowin.com.au www.networkingtowin.com.au 0407906501
  2. 2. Page 2 of 11 Whether you are a first, second or third year student or graduate studying international relations, Asian studies, journalism or public relations or any of the other dozens of degrees available today, LinkedIn can definitely help you get a job or a short or long term consulting contract and/or work experience locally, nationally and internationally. Plus, it is a brilliant research tool when you are wanting to find out more about the people who will be interviewing you. Founded in 2003, LinkedIn’s Mission is to connect the world's professionals to make them more productive and successful. With more than 450 million members (August, 2016) worldwide (located in 200 countries and territories), including executives from every Fortune 500 company, LinkedIn is the world's largest professional network on the Internet today. 70% of the users of LinkedIn are located outside of the USA. The company has a diversified business model with revenue coming from Talent Solutions, Marketing Solutions and Premium Subscriptions products. Headquartered in Silicon Valley, LinkedIn has offices across the globe. According to Forbes magazine (2013) LinkedIn’s popularity has skyrocketed over the last decade. In LinkedIn’s first year it created a mere 1,000,000 followers, in 2008 it held just 22,000,000 followers before hitting a staggering 200,000,000 followers in 2013 and today it sits at 347,000,000 followers and climbing fast. (450 million, August 2016) History of LinkedIn Reid Hoffman is the co-founder and chairman of Silicon Valley’s best performing social networking company LinkedIn. I (Reid) first met Mark Pincus while at PayPal in 2002. I was giving him advice on a startup he was working on. From our first conversation, I felt inspired by Mark’s wild creativity and how he seems to bounce off the walls with energy. I’m more restrained, preferring to fit ideas into strategic frameworks instead of unleashing them fire-hose-style. But it’s our similar interests and vision that have made our collaborations so successful. We invested in Friendster together in 2002. In 2003 the two of us bought the Six Degrees patent, which covers some of the foundational technology of social networking. Mark then started this own social network, Tribe; I started LinkedIn (LNKD). When Peter Thirle and I were
  3. 3. Page 3 of 11 set to put the first money into Facebook in 2004, I suggested that Mark take half of my investment allocation. I wanted to involve Mark in any opportunity that seemed intriguing, especially one that played to his social networking background. (Fortune Magazine, Feb 6, 2012) What is the difference between Facebook and LinkedIn? Facebook is the equivalent of going to the pub, LinkedIn is the equivalent of going to a networking event with a room full of job prospects. If you are serious about using social media to find a job that meets your preferences, LinkedIn is where you need to spend your time. Remember Facebook, like Twitter can do more damage to your future career, than you can ever imagine. Be very careful what photos you put on Facebook. What seems like fun at the time can be considered to be a career destroying activity. How to effectively use LinkedIn As busy as you are throughout the year with your studies, volunteering, assessments, part time job/s and your social life, LinkedIn is a brilliant use of your time and can be managed in as little as 8-10 minutes per day once you have set up your profile. Before you start using LinkedIn, you must be clear on:  Why are you using it?  What do you want to achieve?  How are you going to do that? Some of the many benefits of using LinkedIn are that it is a great way to:  Reconnect with lapsed connections, people in your network that you have lost contact with.  Stay connected with current students that are completing the same degree as you are at your university as well as the broader university network/campuses, reconnect with students you may have studied with at another university.  Connect with your alumni from the school you attended, old flat- mates you may have lost contact with.
  4. 4. Page 4 of 11  Connect with your university alumni and join the alumni group on LinkedIn. Remember your alumni starts from day one of your degree, NOT your graduation day.  Research people working in the organisations that you may like to work with one day.  Have the opportunity to communicate with potential clients and human resources professionals via the groups’ option. Your LinkedIn Profile needs to represent you in the most positive way that it can. Consequently, it may initially take you 20-30 minutes to write your profile and you may even change or update it regularly as your circumstances alter e.g. you take on volunteering opportunities, part time roles and/or additional studies. The six words after your name are the most important words on your LinkedIn profile. Avoid just describing yourself as ‘student’. I know that student is what you are – but anyone looking at your profile, probably won’t click through if you don’t give them a little more description. You may want to write Accountancy Student, Aspiring Accountant, Future Public Relations Consultant, Student Ambassador or 3rd year Asian Studies student. And if you do speak a second or third language you may like to include Bi-lingual Student Ambassador, Multi-lingual Arts Student etc. If you are still unsure about your description, look at other student’s descriptions from other universities and you may feel more confident with your descriptions. Remember there are 450,000,000 people on LinkedIn and it is fast becoming the go-to tool for recruiters today. What else do you need to include? The Summary is the section of LinkedIn where you get to tell your story. Many people don’t put anything in this section at all and that is such a wasted opportunity. In my opinion, the summary is the section where you write about:
  5. 5. Page 5 of 11 * Your life * Why you chose to study whatever you are studying * Where you hope to go with your studies * Your background * Any special interest groups you are part of both in and out of the campus. Unfortunately, when you research other summary sections, you may find that some people use it as a ‘sales’ tool. I firmly believe this is not what it is intended for. One of the facilities on LinkedIn is the option when you look up one person, they offer People Also Viewed and list a number of your competitors according to their algorithms. If you have some spare time, take a few minutes to look at this section and see why LinkedIn thinks these are your so called ‘competitors’. Experience is the next section for you to complete. Here is where you can include activities that you were involved with during your school years, extra-curricular activities etc. If you have helped in a family business over the years, include that experience here and also mention this experience in your summary. If you worked in multiple retail or fast food outlets etc., you may choose to describe this as XX years in retail. You definitely don’t have to list 3 months here, 6 weeks there etc. Awards, recommendations, training, qualifications etc. The fact that you may not have huge work experience doesn’t mean that you can’t talk about your life and all the exciting things you have done and any achievements for which you have been recognised. Languages- definitely include any languages that you are fluent in. Today we are working in a global marketplace, and bi-lingual and multi-lingual students are always in demand. Volunteer you may volunteer from time to time for one off events or long term organisations like the State Emergency Services or local charity. These days when employee competition is so intense, the more well-rounded and experienced you can show that you are, the more appealing you will be to a future employer.
  6. 6. Page 6 of 11 Test Scores – you can include degrees and diplomas that you have completed and the scores you received. Again this shows more evidence of the skills and knowledge you have. Photograph – You must have a professional looking photograph on your LinkedIn profile. However, avoid using selfies or a photo of you standing in front of a monument etc. To take in the monument will mean that your face will be obscured and shrunk in size. The whole point of having a photo is so people can see your face and recognise you and consequently connect with you. If you are aiming for a professional career long term, wear a shirt and tie. If you are more interested in advertising or marketing – something more casual with a shirt collar would be appropriate. Open Profile versus Closed Profile – this is another LinkedIn area where opinions vary. I first learned about LinkedIn from Iggy Pintado www.iggypintado.com, who recommended having an open profile. This means as people connect with you and you with them, if you wish you can look through their connections list and see if you have other people in common. Some people worry that if they have an open profile, everyone will know who they are connected to and will ‘steal’ them, or a similar theory. The bigger picture of LinkedIn is basically ‘build it and they will come’, the more that you connect with the more contacts you have, the faster you will build your profile and more people will get to know about you. LinkedIn is free. There is no charge for LinkedIn and the basic systems that are available. Iggy told me from the start to subscribe to the Premium service @ $US25.00 per month and that is what I did. These days I think it is closer to $50.00 per month for the Premium service. However, for earlier subscribers, my fee is still $US25.00 per month, which I think is good marketing on LinkedIn’s part. Once you increase your connection numbers to 500+ you may take advantage of the 30 day LinkedIn premium trial – but make sure you don’t have exams etc. in the middle of the 30-day period. Pick a 30-day period when you have time to spend daily visits on LinkedIn. I read recently that LinkedIn’s mantra is – To Do Less More Efficiently
  7. 7. Page 7 of 11 To that end, LinkedIn engage 4,000+ engineers who are continually working on improving their systems. What this means as a LinkedIn user is that change is constant on the LinkedIn site. Invitations – You may find that 90% of the people whom you invite to connect with you say yes. And as for the 10% who reject or ignore your invitation, please don’t take it personally. You may have rejected many invitations before you joined LinkedIn and that 10% may be in exactly the same boat. When you do receive an invitation and the name is not familiar to you, if you click on the person’s name, their profile will come up and you will find the number of people whom you have in common. Obviously if you have no connections in common and apparently nothing else in common with this person, you may choose to decline their invitation. LinkedIn will ask you if the invitation is spam and if you think it is, then you can click that button. If you do have connections or interests in common, you may choose to accept the invitation. On average I probably decline 10% of the invitations I receive from total strangers. Sending Invitations to connect - If you are starting from scratch the obvious place to start with your connections are your friends, school alumni, work associates, volunteer connections, etc. Within the current LinkedIn system – when you click on any of people you may know link and press connect – a standard LinkedIn invitation will be sent. However, I think it is more professional to actually click on the person’s name so that the profile comes up and then send a personal invitation from the profile by pressing the connect button. You will then have an option to identify how you know the person e.g. friend, worked together, education etc. Most importantly you will be able to send an actual message and use your choice of personalised invitation wording. People respond much more positively when they receive a personal message.
  8. 8. Page 8 of 11 Examples of LinkedIn invitations – 1. Hi Mary, great to meet you at the Careers Expo on Wednesday. All the best with your assignments. I would like to connect with you on LinkedIn. 2. HI Joe, a blast from the past. I used to work with you at XXX. Great to see you on LinkedIn, would like to connect with you. 3. HI Jason, we are both members of the XXX group and I would like to connect with you. 4. Hi Marvin, we met at Jason’s 21st . We spoke at length about music and gigs. I just saw you on LinkedIn and thought I would like to invite you to connect with me. 5. HI Alex, I am studying xxx at x university and see that you are part of the alumni. I would like to connect with you. After you accept a LinkedIn invitation – always send a thank you for your invitation and start a conversation. Why bother? The minute it takes you to write the thank you message is another opportunity to strengthen your network. Use LinkedIn as a research tool – if you are going for a job interview, definitely check out the company website as well as the LinkedIn profiles of the people in the interview panels. Keep your eye on your connections career movements – Under the connections tab you will find a Keep in Touch drop down menu. Within 30 seconds of clicking on this tab you will find a series of drop down boxes showing your connections birthday, recent career moves and job anniversaries. There is a very efficient system where you can send a quick message to that person – Congratulations on your new job, all the best for 2017, or
  9. 9. Page 9 of 11 you can press skip and proceed to the next message. There will also be a list of people in your connections list who have written a new post. If you have time you may read their post and send a comment about the post. Using LinkedIn as a follow up tool after attending networking events – Sometimes when you attend a business, industry or association networking event, you sometimes wonder how you will connect with that person in a non-pushy way. LinkedIn is the perfect follow up tool. Even if the person is not someone who will necessarily connect you with a future employer or offer you a job themselves, you have spoken to them for a length of time, found common ground and spend time with them. During your conversation, you may ask them the question – how are you finding LinkedIn? If they are not yet on LinkedIn, then you will have an opportunity to discuss why you are on it. If they are on LinkedIn, you can ask them, “May I send you a LinkedIn invitation?” Of course they still have the opportunity to reject your invitation, however, if you take a moment to read their profile and make reference to that item and the fact that you met them at the event, you are moving your connection from stranger to acquaintance very quickly. And you are also making it easy for people to make contact with you again. Time allocation One of the great things about LinkedIn is that everyone starts with zero connections and as you spend time on LinkedIn you definitely see reward for your effort. 10 minutes LinkedIn activity per day is a great time frame to aim for. Initially as student it is wise to cluster your activity so that you maximise your effort.
  10. 10. Page 10 of 11 So how will you spend you LinkedIn time? Every day Look for interesting Updates to send to your connections or the general public. Scan your Keep in Touch segment and send congratulations or happy birthday messages to your connections. Weekly activities Time management wise when you cluster your activities you will maximise your 10 minutes on LinkedIn Day 1 Focus on sending invitations – connect via individual profiles and then send a personal invitation. Look through your network’s connections list for mutual connections. Day 2 Review Pulse – located under the interests button – Pulse is in the drop down menu and includes lots of interesting articles that you may like to share with you network by pressing on the share LinkedIn button. You have the capacity to include a short message as well. Day 3 Give a recommendation – there are many people in your network and connections list who you can recommend or give a compliment to. Type the person’s name into the LinkedIn header, go to their profile page and half way down the page you will find ‘recommendations’ and the ‘give a recommendation’ button for you to click. Recommendations do not need to be long winded. 10-15 words is fine. Day 4 Review the groups that you have joined or are considering joining – look for geographic groups, industry professional groups, special interest groups etc.
  11. 11. Page 11 of 11 Go for quality not quantity in terms of the number of groups you join. Feel free to ask or answer questions relevant to the group and become involved in discussions. If your group has been inactive for more than 90 days, you may choose to leave it. You can do this by clicking on the member button at the top right of the group page. You will have the option leave group. When you click that button the group logo will also be removed from your profile page. Day 5 Take time to research ‘jobs’ on LinkedIn – you can register your interest, follow companies and individuals, indicate the locations you are looking for jobs and keep a record of the jobs that you apply for. This jobs section does change from time to time – so make sure you visit it on a weekly basis. Like most social media tools, the more you use them, the better you get at using them and the wider your profile spreads and your connections grow. With many final year students and graduates looking for work in your sector, it is important to invest time on LinkedIn as it is definitely a well-used recruiter’s tool today. As a student there will be days and sometimes weeks when you are caught up with exams, assignments and deadlines and your LinkedIn activity will slide. Life goes on. If you make LinkedIn part of your weekly profile building/job search activity you will definitely be making it easier for your employer of choice to find you. Finally, we are not connected on LinkedIn as yet, please feel free to send me an invitation to connect. All the best with your job search Robyn Henderson robyn@networkingtowin.com.au www.networkingtowin.com.au

×